You Can Now Transfer Licenses For Your Xbox 360 Content

As suspected, Microsoft has finally addressed the DRM issue with content you’ve purchased on your Xbox 360. In the past, if you bought a new console you couldn’t transfer the licenses—one customer was told by an Xbox 360 CSR to “buy the content again.” Now you can visit this page on xbox.com and transfer your licenses to a new console. Hooray for progress!

It’s a simple two-part process. First, you must transfer your authorized licenses here on the site. Second, you must download the transferred licenses onto your new Xbox 360.

Microsoft points out that if you’ve sent your Xbox 360 in for repair or replacement, “the licenses have already been transferred as part of the repair process, and you do not need to use the license transfer tool, but you may need to download the content again.”

“Transferring Content Licenses to a New Console” (Thanks to Justin!)

RELATED
“UPDATE: Microsoft May Slowly Be Fixing Their Broken XBOX DRM”
“Replace Your XBOX 360? ‘Sorry, We Can’t Help You. Buy All Of Your Content A Second Time’”

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  1. zentex says:

    hooray indeedy!

    granted, it’s not super-model easy…but hell, it’s better than it had been.

    fwiw, super-model easy would mean the stuff just works once you bind your GamerTag to the console.

  2. Swervo says:

    Well, that certain makes a decision I had been mulling over a little easier. My 360 is getting old and tired, failing to read discs, the back USB port has gone dead, etc, and I wanted to just go buy a new 360 with the better chipset and a larger hard drive. The only thing holding me back was the licensing issue, as I have a metric ton of Rock Band downloads.

    I wish they didn’t have that “only once every 12 months” business going on with it, but again, better than before.

  3. donkeyjote says:

    @zentex: Super-models’ arn’t easy. Even they have standards.

    Also, by bind the gamertag, you mean ala steam?

  4. mgy says:

    Can you sell the licenses to other Xbox users?

  5. t325 says:

    @Swervo: FWIW, with the Rock Band DLC, when my brother’s 360 crapped out and he sent it off for repair, a few times he put his hard drive in mine, and the Rock Band DLC worked as long as he was connected to Xbox Live.

  6. Kyattsuai says:

    @t325: I think that’s how it’s always been, but it’s not a complete fix, since there’s just times where you can’t be online, or where Live is down. My 360 is far from any ethernet port, and I have to move it to download stuff, so this is good news that I don’t have to watch it like a hawk hoping it doesn’t die to preserve DLC.

  7. Concerned_Citizen says:

    I wonder how many times they let you do it? I would be quite surprised if they did this right and have set no limits.

  8. kyle4 says:

    I bought around $25 worth of stuff before I had the wireless adapter and when I returned my 360 and got another one all was lost. Since I bought an adapter and the Xbox Live Gold card and have a new gamertag, and since I don’t want the old one to overwrite what I’ve done, is there any way to retrieve what was on that other account (Silver) and transfer it on the same 360 to my new one?

  9. The_IT_Crone says:

    @Concerned_Citizen: It states once a year, both in the XBL article and here in the comments.

    If anyone here runs out to do this, can you please report back? I’d really like to know how well it goes, and if there are any unforseen problems.

  10. dequeued says:

    This is beyond pathetic.

    How could you people “buy” content that you knew contained DRM, and very restrictive DRM at that?
    It’s not as if most of the people here don’t know what DRM is or why it’s evil.
    Just what the hell was going through your mind?

    Gee, maybe if microsoft is really feeling nice, they will let you play the content you purchased on your laptop, but only after the content has been intentionally degraded, and after you pay a “nominal” fee, and you will only be able to play it for 24 hours.

    People who indulge companies that use DRM suck, because you’re just encouraging them and validating their deceptive and evil business model.

    Why don’t you go buy some stuff advertised in spam emails, too?

  11. RedSonSuperDave says:

    Well, it’s a step in the right direction.

    That being said, the five-month nightmare I had to endure to get my DLC to work with my replacement console pretty much turned me off console gaming forever. From the ignorant associates on Microsoft’s help line who gave me incorrect information on 18 out of 20 calls (and yes, that’s the true figure, not an exaggeration), to Microsoft falsely stating to the BBB that my issue had been resolved a full three months before it was actually fixed, I’m pretty much in agreement with dequeued, although I would not presume to express myself in such a manner.

    There’s games such as Rez HD, Metal Slug, and Ikaruga that I would buy on Live in a heartbeat, if I was actually buying the games, and not a “license” to use them until MS decides that I don’t need them anymore. Too bad. The one and only game I’m purchasing for the 360 is one that I actually won in a bet with an overzealous GameStop employee. After that, I will most likely give my 360 away to a lucky Consumerist reader, and I’ll be damned if I will ever purchase another M$ product ever again.

    If any Microsoft employee wishes to discuss with me how their so-called “service” could be improved, or how I could be persuaded to become a Microsoft customer (instead of a sworn enemy who will take any possible opportunity to criticize them on the Internet), feel free to contact me.

  12. UESC says:

    I just did this for my main gamertag (UESC) and my old gamertag that MS fucked up in 2006 (UESC2 – which used to be UESC)

    …and it worked like a charm! 2 games i refused to buy again worked under my UESC gamertag after the transfer.

    …now if MS would only refund me for the 12 games i had to buy again, i’d be a happy camper!

  13. TPK says:

    I have hard time calling this “progress”… more like a big fat greedy company finally deciding to begin to scratch and scrape enough to start to pull themselves out of the slime pit of DRM…

  14. azntg says:

    @TPK: Agreed. And a begrudging one at that.

  15. nicless says:

    @dequeued: Well, I for one bought DRM content because I enjoy having fun. Instead of being angry at everything and anyone about random stuff, I’ll just be over here playing my downloaded tracks on Rock Band.

  16. nXt says:

    The once every twelve months thing is so you don’t keep logging on to your friend’s xbox 360 and “transfering” the license to his machine so he can get free games to play on his 360.

  17. dequeued says:

    I hate to be one of those people to kick someone when their down, I really do, BUT, anyone who brought content on the 360 deserves to lose their money.

    Look what happened to customers who supported Microsoft’s first music store venture.
    Don’t buy too much stuff, because you *will* lose it eventually.

  18. I read about this on Kotaku and went to Xbox.com and completed the process in about 5 minutes. Granted, the issues I was having meant that I had to “redownload” the items in question, but if they are still on your HDD, it doesn’t actually redownload the file, it just updates the DRM (I think) and takes 3 seconds per download.

    Although most won’t agree with me, I’m glad they waited this long for this functionality. I have gone through 5 360s and have two working 360s right now. Sometimes the silver accounts could play the XBL games, sometimes not.

    @dequeued: Barring future hardware failures, this tool allows access to all games and content you download for all of eternity, which future-proofs your purchases even IF they aren’t transferable to the next MS console. As long as you have a working 360, you’re good to go.

    As for your argument against DRM…get over it. I’m sure your parents are glad you are using this wonderful technology to fight the good fight against, well, technology, but the rest of us just don’t care. You want the world to be free and without restrictions? Go live on a mountain with some goats. In the meantime, we’ll enjoy the benefits of a continually-expanding and advancing society where some ideas will be found to be not-so-great and will be improved upon so we can get past the adolescent stage of media sharing/piracy/drm/PROFIT.

    @RedSonSuperDave: Yup…took them from August 2007 to April 2008 for me as well. Then I realized that the replacement they sent me for my RROD had a bad USB port on the back…so I got to start the process all over. With the tool, it’s all linked to one console now…finally.

  19. WEGGLES90 says:

    Aug why don’t I stay logged in >_>

    Anywho. This is great, because now I can finally use the stuff I bought with an American points card. American points don’t work on Canadian accounts. The CSR told me to make an american account, and that I’d be able to use it with my Canadian one. But once I shipped in my 360 the American bought content didn’t work and M$ had no fix and basically said “Oh well”. I rebought a bunch of things I had bought on my US account, on my Canadian account. Will I be credited for those points I had to spend twice?

    If this is double post sorry, all the Gawker blogs have been weird for me to comment on lately.

  20. mac-phisto says:

    hooray! seriously, 360 getting better & better every day.

    now, if only microsoft could get their products to work before releasing them to the marketplace /pipe dream

    incidentally, i don’t remember seeing an xbl update recently, but has anyone else noticed their boxes working better?

    mine used to rrod 6 or 7 times before it would start up & sounded like an industrial boiler when it finally started up. now the rrod issue is gone & it sounds much more quiet. still have a disc tray issue (won’t open), but i’ve found that if i give the tray the hong kong phooey chop right when it clicks, it opens. no biggie.

    we also have one downstairs that was junk (video res issue out of warranty), but that one has magically started working now (which is awesome b/c we use it to stream music across the network & selecting songs is damn difficult when the display is jumping back & forth).

  21. WEGGLES90 says:

    @dequeued:

    What? For the most part the 360′s DLC DRM wokrs just to prevent multiple people on separate consoles from using the same DRM at the same time. That is, of course, if it works. Some times it doesn’t work out perfectly and stuff like this happens, where you can’t play the content you paid for, but that by no means means I’m not going to buy downloadable content. There’s too much excelent stuff to miss out on, for me at least. And there really isn’t any other avenue to get this content. And what’s this about accessing it on a laptop… do you even know how the DLC works..?

  22. WEGGLES90 says:

    @mac-phisto:
    I think that’s pure coincidence. There wasn’t an update, and even if there was I don’t see how it could fix the issues you’re having :p. But consider your self lucky I guess… my 360 still has this problem of every once in a blue moon scratching disks. But it’s out of warrenty and I don’t want to force RROD it, should something fuck up and I’m royally screwed.

  23. zlionsfan says:

    @mgy: No, the licenses are non-transferable. You may only transfer all the content associated you’ve purchased to a console on which you’ve logged in, so that it all functions as if you’d purchased it on that console. (IOW, anyone can use it on your console, and you can use it if you are logged in on a console that has it.)

    @dequeued: I would recommend learning about the 360.

    @The_IT_Crone: Like the others above, I had no problems running this. It didn’t take long at all … I do have my laptop in the same room as the 360, so it was easy to go back and forth. If you don’t have a computer in the same room, it’ll take a little longer, but other than that, it’s quick and easy.

    @WEGGLES90: I don’t believe you are going to get credit for the content you purchased on your other account. The CSR was wrong, as you’ve seen. You can try to work with MS to get a refund, but don’t get your hopes up. (You might also check a 360-specific site like [www.xbox360achievements.org] to see if someone else in your situation had any luck.) I can’t test this myself, but I believe this tool will only work within a “region”, and that you won’t be able to combine your licenses.

  24. dequeued says:

    @FatalisticDread:

    Dude, DRM is dying; the good guys are winning.

    By the way, I have my cake and eat it too, I have access to everything you have, only it’s in an unencrypted open format, and ten years from now, if I feel like watching an episode of futurama on my cell phone, I can.

    When I get a blueray burner, I am going to be able to fit my entire collection of movies and tv shows onto a dozen discs, and I will have it for the rest of my life, and be able to transfer it to any medium I choose.

    You, on the other hand, will be stuck lugging around your xbox.

    Again, you might be able to stream it to another device, but only if Microsoft decides to let you, and I am sure they will charge.

    And yes, I do think information should be free.

    The computer revolution was founded on abundance of information, not this manufactured scarcity.

    DRM is bad for society and bad for innovation.

    And anyone who buys DRM is contributing to this, it doesn’t make you evil, but it is about as bad as doing business with spammers.

    @WEGGLES90:

    So what if the DRM isn’t very intrusive, and it’s only inconvenient “some of the time”

    Listen to what you’re saying!

    You paid for this content, and you should damn well be able to enjoy it whenever the hell you want, on whatever device you want.

    Charging full price for anything less is a slap in the face.

    I am so sick of this appoligetic attitude “Masta not so bad, and he only whip us when we talk back”

  25. @dequeued: In case you’ve never seen one, an Xbox360 isn’t something you carry around with you to watch TV shows on while taking a break at work. It’s hooked up to a television and plugs into the wall. So why I would want my 360 to compete with your cell phone and bittorrented TV shows, I’m not quite sure.

    You think that information should be free, but you aren’t talking about originality and ideas, you’re talking about products. You pay for your internet connection so you can scour the tubes in search of the information that pleases you so you can pilfer it for your own enjoyment without incurring additional costs. You aren’t above DRM, you are the reason it exists!

    Tirade all you want about the way our society tries to protect intellectual property via copyright, trademark, DRM, etc, but in the end, it is all an attempt to give credit to those that create that which you so brazenly steal. Perhaps DRM is the devil, but to accuse it of stifling innovation is just your version of “The-Man-is-keeping-me-down”, and that’s straight bull-shit. Unless you have a solution to the answer that allows access while giving credit, DRM is all we have for now. Do you demand to see multiple movies when you go to the theater because you paid for admission to the theater? No, of course you don’t, because you are sitting at home downloading your movies off of the internet and giving the RIAA reason to continue their witch-hunt.

    Get over yourself: you’re not helping to solve an issue, you’re just bitching because somewhere along the way you backed Betamax.

  26. WEGGLES90 says:

    @dequeued:
    Say what you want, all I know is I’m enjoying my XBLA games, my DLC and you aren’t.

  27. WEGGLES90 says:

    @zlionsfan:
    Naw I won’t get credit. But I’m still pissed that I followed their instructions exactly and still got shafted. Oh well. It as only… 4 dollars of stuff I re-bought, and I got the other stuff back with this tool. Ends must justify the means, and 4 dollars isn’t something to go grey over on the phone with an Xbox CSR who probably doesn’t even know what Xbox is…

  28. mac-phisto says:

    @dequeued: <— hates drm, believes in free information, but supports blu-ray.

    wait, wha-wha-what??!? blu-ray is chock full of drm, & despite bypasses, the entire system hasn’t been cracked yet. & even if it is in the future, i’m sure sony will just have it install a rootkit.

    lol.

  29. I’ve believed for some time that the future of digital content is a robust and fair DRM solution. Studios are not going to flood the marketplace with their content until they know it is truly safe.

    Movie & TV saw what you guys did to the software and music industries. Claim innocence and ideals all you like, but the bottom line is that both are being brutally murdered by online theft. Ask any games developer why he designs for Xbox or PS3 or Wii instead of PC; he’ll mention market penetration and the fact that the users have accepted a “put in the disc containing most of the game content to play” DRM model.

    It’s not perfect, but it’s far harder than firing up thepiratebay and robbing dev teams of their livelihood.

  30. lordargent says:

    I tried this last night, but for some reason in Halo 3, I still have to go into custom games before it will recognize that I have purchased both of the map packs.

    If I try to go straight to team slayer, it will say something like “someone doesn’t have the map packs necessary to play on this playlist”.

  31. MrEvil says:

    This migration tool transfers the machine licence which allows you to access DLC without being connected to Xbox Live. Granted the only real limit on it is that you’re limited to using it once every 12 months….However, I wouldn’t say that’s much of a negative considering the people that would probably use this tool are those with out of warranty bricked XBoxes that have purchased a new one. By the time the warranty is up on the new one you can transfer your machine licence again.

    There might be a hoop to jump through, but it’s better than a sharp stick in the eye and getting the finger.

  32. dequeued says:

    @FatalisticDread:

    @dequeued: In case you’ve never seen one, an Xbox360 isn’t something you carry around with you to watch TV shows on while taking a break at work. It’s hooked up to a television and plugs into the wall. So why I would want my 360 to compete with your cell phone and bittorrented TV shows, I’m not quite sure.

    Oh, I know all about how the xbox works.
    I have a modded xbox at home hooked up to my tv that I use to play whatever I want. (Not just what microsoft gives me permission to play)

    But anyway, you missed my point completely.
    My point was that I at least have the *option* of playing the content I own on my cell phone, or my xbox.
    Being that I get torrents in open, unencrypted format, I can copy them or stream them to xbox, or shrink them down onto an sd card to watch on my cell phone on the subway to work.
    And I can watch it as many times as I want, without having to connect to license servers, validate it, or activate it.

    You can’t do that now, but maybe one day you can, but I am sure you will have to pay for each device you watch your content on.

    @FatalisticDread:

    You think that information should be free, but you aren’t talking about originality and ideas, you’re talking about products. You pay for your internet connection so you can scour the tubes in search of the information that pleases you so you can pilfer it for your own enjoyment without incurring additional costs. You aren’t above DRM, you are the reason it exists!

    No, YOU’RE the reason DRM exists!
    I have never, ever paid for a product that uses DRM.
    The intellectual property industry is slowly coming to realize that if they want the business of people like me — people who like to actually OWN what they pay for, they have to abandon DRM.
    Now that the record industry is realizing how futile DRM is, they are finally getting my money.
    It only took them about a decade.

    If everyone was like me, DRM would be long dead, if everyone was like you, DRM would be ubiquitous.
    Because you tolerate it, and give them your money.

    Tell me, how many Circuit City DIVX ([en.wikipedia.org]) Discs did you buy back in the 90s? LOL

    FYI, they started it, it’s not as if they started distributing content in an unencumbered format, and as a result of piracy they were forced to lock it down.
    They locked it down first, and as a result of product incompatibility and consumer frustration, they are abandoning it.

    Tirade all you want about the way our society tries to protect intellectual property via copyright, trademark, DRM, etc, but in the end, it is all an attempt to give credit to those that create that which you so brazenly steal. Perhaps DRM is the devil, but to accuse it of stifling innovation is just your version of “The-Man-is-keeping-me-down”, and that’s straight bull-shit. Unless you have a solution to the answer that allows access while giving credit, DRM is all we have for now. Do you demand to see multiple movies when you go to the theater because you paid for admission to the theater? No, of course you don’t, because you are sitting at home downloading your movies off of the internet and giving the RIAA reason to continue their witch-hunt.

    It’s not my responsibility to figure out how these companies can make money, but it absolutely my prerogative as a consumer, to complain about how they distribute it.
    What is this, a charity?
    “Oh, poor multibillion dollar monopoly can’t please it’s shareholders! Poor thing, lets use their broken content distribution system until they fix it!”

    I may not know exactly how they should make money, but I can certainly tell them now NOT to make money.

    Also, just because a company is making money doesn’t mean that what they’re doing isn’t wrong.
    You could use that same logic to defend other shady corporate practices, like cell phone company sim card locks, early termination fees, and the like.

    That said, there are many options for making money without DRM.
    There are plenty of places that make a profit selling completely unencrypted content *cough* apple *cough*, and simply trusting the customer not to blatantly violate copyright.

    Oh, and one last thing, don’t give me that whole Copying=Stealing line of crap.
    Stealing is when some measurable asset is diminished and the rightful owner is deprived of something.
    When I use bittorrent, I am not only not decreasing the supply of something, I am increasing the supply of it.

    Also, I was never going to be a customer of theirs as long as they sell DRM infected crap anyway, so I don’t factor into the equation.
    Just because I choose not to use their hardware and their store, and play ball by their rules, does not make me a thief.

    Get over yourself: you’re not helping to solve an issue, you’re just bitching because somewhere along the way you backed Betamax.

    Um, yeah, *I* am the one who is backing a dead-end technology, sure.
    Mark my words, DRM has no future, and if you’re dumb enough to invest in encrypted content, well, you may be lucky enough to get it unlocked one day.

    @mac-phisto:

    @dequeued: <— hates drm, believes in free information, but supports blu-ray.

    wait, wha-wha-what??!? blu-ray is chock full of drm, & despite bypasses, the entire system hasn’t been cracked yet. & even if it is in the future, i’m sure sony will just have it install a rootkit.

    lol.

    Oh really?
    So, when I take some AVI encapsulated XviD videos and burn them onto a DVD, they have encryption?
    No.
    Bluray is great for data archiving, it can store 25 to 50 Gigabytes per disc.
    Using the latest codecs I can store about five seasons of a show in DVD quality on a 25 gig bluray disk.
    Also, if I just store HD video on a bluray disc, I would be able to store about a third more since I wouldn’t have the overhead from encrpytion.

    @ADismalScience:

    I’ve believed for some time that the future of digital content is a robust and fair DRM solution. Studios are not going to flood the marketplace with their content until they know it is truly safe.

    Movie & TV saw what you guys did to the software and music industries. Claim innocence and ideals all you like, but the bottom line is that both are being brutally murdered by online theft. Ask any games developer why he designs for Xbox or PS3 or Wii instead of PC; he’ll mention market penetration and the fact that the users have accepted a “put in the disc containing most of the game content to play” DRM model.

    It’s not perfect, but it’s far harder than firing up thepiratebay and robbing dev teams of their livelihood.

    First of all, there is not such thing as “fair” DRM.
    DRM doesn’t know or care that you just want to capture a video stream for 30 seconds to make a movie review, and DRM can’t tell the difference between a copyrighted motion picture and your wedding video.
    Copyright was meant to be administered on a case by case basis, with many exceptions, and therfore it can’t be enforced by a machine.

    I have a novel idea, how about we use the oldest form of “copy protection”, it’s called copyright law, and it works.
    I could give you a massive list of sucessful only companies that sell music, audiobooks, and movies without any type of DRM.

    Besides, DRM was never about stopping piracy, tell me, has DRM ever prevented even a single movie, tv show, and music track from getting online? Ever?
    Can you think of a single movie that you can’t download for free?
    DRM is, at it’s core, technically unfeasable and will never work, and the sooner everyone figures that out, the better we will all be.

    And don’t preach to me about game developers, I AM a game developer, I am using the Torque 2D side scroller API with XNA and C# to develop a game for the xbox live marketplace, but we are also compiling it for windows directx, without any kind of DRM.
    Just because a 14 year old, who wouldn’t buy from us anyway may download our program, we don’t really care.

    Any questions?

  33. mac-phisto says:

    @dequeued: if you say so, man. even if you are burning unencrypted files to an unprotected bluray disc as your preferred medium, my point is that you’re paying for DRM. your discs may not utilize the “features” that sony embeds on their content, but by purchasing the discs, you are supporting their operation. by purchasing the player, you’re integrating the DRM into your household.

    i would think understanding that sony is a major force behind DRM should be the basis for your game plan.

    i data archive on redundant HDDs & move my media onto portable formats when i need it (mostly flash cards, but none of the memory stick variety). i don’t see why you require bluray to accomplish your tasks.

  34. @dequeued:

    A few responses -

    Fair use is and will remain a gray area. Even today, it’s unclear what segments of AP articles are available for copying and distribution, what constitutes an excerpt, etc. These things need to be settled by courts, where, unfortunately, capitalized entities like corporations hold a huge representation advantage.

    You might be able to give me a massive list of successful companies that sell DRM-free music, though I question the degree of success and definition you might employ. I have an equivalently massive list of companies that have been crippled by digital abuse and file sharing in the PC gaming, music, and film industries particularly.

    As for prevention: it HAS prevented some less-sophisticated users from accessing the content. I’m not arguing that you can fairly cast an impermeable net here, it’s impossible. But DRM is like a speed limit – it’s designed to establish a standard of behavior and a means by which to prosecute the worst offenders. Which is fair. If you steal terabytes of music, movies, and games, you owe a lot of people money.

  35. @dequeued: Wow…just…wow.

    I really want to write a long-winded response to your long-winded response, but it’s a waste of my time. You have convinced yourself that the “if-I-can-get-it-for-free-why-pay” argument, and there is nothing anyone anywhere can say that will make you realize that theft doesn’t have to mean you walk into a store, pick something off of a shelf, put it in your pocket, and walk out the door without paying for it.

    You want your entertainment given to you without cost to you…even though it cost someone something. Even if they are millionaires, it doesn’t free you from the laws that say you get what you pay for and you must pay for what you get.

    Enjoy it.

    …oh, and no, I didn’t back DIVX as it was an inconvenience and DVD’s plan was better…at the time. By the same token, DIVX would have saved me some money because there are MANY DVDs I paid $15-30 for and watched once. Not everyone has to “own” that which they enjoy. Why do you think people still pay for adult films on pay-per-view? Isn’t there enough free porn on the internet for them?

  36. NiGHTSSTUDiO says:

    Now we need them to address the whole RROD issue with early adopters

  37. jeremybwilson says:

    But as I’ve recently come to find out, you are absolutely frakked if you have to replace your console within 365 days of each other. One melted down on me and I literally mean burnt itself out. I took it back to Costco, who replaced it. Thank you Costco. Even after calling up 1-800-4MY-XBOX and speaking with their so-called customer support reps, I was told they ‘would not’ (not could not) transfer my content licenses from the old console to the new one. Keep in mind that all DLC is associated with the consoleID (hardware) and not the HDD you downloaded it to. So the data transfer tool really means nothing as the games licenses are still assigned to the old consoleID. Adding insult to injury, recently purchased Xbox Live points activated only after the arrival of the new console are assigning the DLC purchased to the same old consoleID and so far the email string back and forth with M$ over the past week has involved four different responses from four different reps, all of them regurgitating useless FAQ information on their website and none of them taking the time to address the specifics of my issue.

    I’m getting ‘bent over’ right now and it would seem that it is just as dequeued predicted above…

    :(