Review Of Mint.com's New Investment-Tracking Features

I got to check out personal finance management site Mint.com’s new investment-tracking component before the private beta launches tomorrow. You can now add Brokerage, IRA, 401k and 529 assets. The two biggest things it offers are line graphs, and a way to see all the fees, dividends, deposits and withdrawals in one, clear, organized window. Unlike with the credit card tracking, they don’t seem to be making any suggestions about how you might save money by switching to a different investment firm. You also can’t yet push assets between accounts through Mint. As before, you will have to give up your username and password to your various financial services to let Mint scrape the data. The new brokerage features are hardly mind-blowing, but by having investment-tracking now Mint can basically be your entire financial dashboard, you just can’t touch all the levers yet. Sexy screenshots, inside…

FYI, this is test data, not my money.

PREVIOUSLY: Mint.com – A New Free Personal Finance Management Site

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  1. tcp100 says:

    Ben, you keep $25,000 in checking? Are they paying you good interest, or is that for the booze and limos?

  2. Ben Popken says:

    @tcp100: Not my data.

  3. theblackdog says:

    Sorry, I’m not giving these guys my TSP information.

  4. skittlbrau says:

    Yodlee has been doing this for awhile.

  5. tcp100 says:

    @skittlbrau = baa: Yeah, and Yodlee has always kinda creeped me out.. I know they guarantee security, but man, what a gold mine if anyone ever got into their data.

  6. mobilehavoc says:

    Putting this type of info on a site that is “beta” seems rather stupid. BankOfAmerica offers a similar (if not as web 2.0ish looking) service that’s part of their online account management. It works great and I feel safer using it with BofA than at “Mint”

  7. cdan says:

    @skittlbrau = baa: If you read the FAQ’s it says Mint actually uses Yodlee’s account data aggregation services.

    Also says Mint doesn’t store any of your account info, only the transactions from your accounts/credit cards.

    [www.mint.com]

    Will be curious to see if they provide the transaction data (and portfolio management tools) for the investment side.

  8. jennej says:

    @mobilehavoc: BofA uses Yodlee.

  9. RumorsDaily says:

    You’re rich! Quit your day job!

  10. OakesHaermm says:

    Comment on Review Of Mint.com’s New Investment-Tracking Features Any idea when they will add home mortgages?

  11. Wegmans says:

    No T. Rowe Price? you’re missing out!

  12. Ansonwolfe says:

    Bank of America’s Portfolio has been very clunky at best in my experience. Several of my Citi accounts intermittently cannot update. Been debating about purchasing Quicken or sticking to Excel and using Mint. Looks like this is making Quicken less and less enticing as they roll out more features.

  13. babulas says:

    When it comes to web-based personal finance services I read a lot about people saying is crazy to provide your user ID and passwords to a bunch of twenty somethings. Really, how much damage you can suffer if someone gets a holds of that info (remember that you don’t provide your account # or SS #)?

    In your bank or credit card website you cannot see your account number. In the CC website you cannot make purchases nor transfer money. Only in my Bank of America website you could transfer money, and I have it set up to cap at US$500 per day (this cannot be changed online. On top of this BoA has a limit of US$2000 per day no matter what. Further I have email alerts for every transaction above US$350. If someone change my email address BoA (or any CC) will send an email to the old email address just in case.

    I have even called my CC asking to give me my credit card number while being logged to their website to give them specific of my account transactions. And nada, they don’t give it to you unless you give them your SS #. And we’ll know that if your SS # is out there you’re dead.

    The only damage I can see is someone using my mileage account in my credit card websites to by stupid gadgets.

    Give it a try. Ask your best friend “to make a lot damage” by giving him you login info.

    Am I missing something?

  14. lhomme77 says:

    Sure wish I could use the service… it’s been almost a year since I requested they add my bank for the first time; requested again in Dec. and still no mojo. I’ve been using Quicken as a fallback and it’s ok, but nothing to write home about–other than it actually interfacing with my bank.

  15. chiieddy says:

    I find it somewhat humorous/ironic I’m reading this immediately after an article about someone flipping out on whether to provide Home Depot with their zip code and if they’re using the items for home or business use.

  16. dalejo says:

    @babulas: At the very least there is personal, identifiable information displayed from your account that Mint has access to. And don’t think that at least initially that your login and passwords aren’t going through Mint – your SSL connection terminates with them. It does not go through straight to Yodlee. Also, AJAX is notoriously insecure since most developers just don’t have any sort of training in the security paradigm.

    I trust Yodlee itself as much as one can. I don’t trust Mint. Their CEO has been asked many times about user’s privacy and security and it has been clear from his answers that his does not understand the implications of either. He babbles in some dumbed down marketing speak.

  17. iambill says:

    When will this feature be available for public use?

  18. facted says:

    @dalejo: From the way I understand it, Mint originally takes your username and password and sends it to Yoodle the 1st time you setup the account. After that, Mint no longer needs that information and it is stored on Yoodle where your accounts are given a userID so that all of your accounts are clustered together. When Mint wants your info, it simply requests for Yoodle to connect it directly to all accounts who have that userID. Yoodle takes care of actually logging you in to those accounts at the bank/credit card/etc…