Blimpie, Please Put Your Nutritional Info Back Online

The new caloric information law in New York City has begun to show itself in restaurants—yesterday we decided against a fudge brownie at Starbucks because it was over 400 calories. A reader named Spoon wrote in to let us know that Blimpie, however, still hasn’t bothered to put its nutritional information back on its website. They took it down last summer in a failed attempt to skirt the NYC law before it was rewritten. Now, ten months later, they’re still keeping consumers in the dark and incorrectly blaming it on New York City.

Here’s the disingenuous “explanation” on their nutrition page:

Nutritional Information for Consumers in New York City
We regret that we can no longer publicly post nutritional information on our website. This development is a result of the New York City Department of Health’s decision to pass a regulation requiring restaurants that already publicly provide caloric information, to post product calories on their menu boards – using the same type size as the product listing.
 
We fully support the intent of this regulation; however, due to the amount of menu items we carry, there simply isn’t enough room on our existing menu boards to comply with the regulation. As a result, we will no longer be able to provide nutritional information on our website or to residents and customers of our New York City stores. We regret this inconvenience. If you have questions about this regulation, please contact the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and refer to Health Code Section 81.50.

Until Blimpie finally decides to be forthright about its food, you can find out how many calories are in their items on various third-party websites—here’s an example.
 
“New York City Proposes New Menu Labeling Regulations”

Comments

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  1. howie_in_az says:

    We fully support the intent of this regulation; however, due to the amount of menu items we carry, there simply isn’t enough room on our existing menu boards to comply with the regulation. As a result, we will no longer be able to provide nutritional information on our website or to residents and customers of our New York City stores.

    There’s only so much text that you can fit on the internet.

  2. MBZ321 says:

    It looks like they are saying, since the information is not publicly available (eg. Blimpie website), they are under no obligation to post the nutritional information in their stores. I don’t know much about this whole NYC law, but it is a clever loophole nonetheless.

  3. FromThisSoil says:

    I don’t get it…so they’re being spiteful by removing it all together?

  4. WraithSama says:

    @howie_in_az:
    Indeed. The size of their menu boards is completely and totally irrelevant to why they “can’t” post the information on their webpage.

  5. Here’s how I read this:

    Hi, this is the Blimpie Corporation. We have decided to inconvenience you, our valued customer in Texas, because we’re being babies about a new regulation in some city 1500 miles away. Have a nice day and go fuck yourself.

  6. geoelectric says:

    I agree, that’s what they’re saying.

    If I understand the rest of the article, though, the law no longer has that loophole, which means now they’re just omitting it illegally.

  7. jdame says:

    I side with Blimpie. Allow(or make) people to be personal responsibility for their diet.

  8. I’ve never been to a Blimpie but the fact that their name sounds like a disparaging term for a fat person, IMHO, say enough.

  9. B says:

    @jdame: Be responsible how? By bringing the sub to our lab and measuring the nutritional value ourselves? Or by not shopping at Blimpies?

  10. jdame says:

    @B: sorry, i just assume that if see a sub with tons of toppings and of massive size that its probably loaded with calories. Charts shouldn’t be required for that, just common sense.

  11. DrGirlfriend says:

    @jdame: I regret to inform you that the best way to give people the ability to be responsible for their diet is to make information available to them. If someone is managing their caloric intake and they want to know how many calories they are ingesting, that’s actually taking responsibility for their consumption.

  12. azntg says:

    There’s very little Blimpies out here in my neck of New York City. They can go f- themselves.

    I do check the nutritional information from time to time and use them to make informed purchases. I don’t understand how we can do just that if they remove those information.

  13. jdame says:

    @DrGirlfriend: Okay, but the city has to pass a regulation to require the restaurant to do this? That’s the issue here. what is someone at a fine dining restaurant to do if they are watching caloric intake? The regulation seems a little one sided.

  14. dreamcatcher2 says:

    @jdame: Perhaps it’s one-sided, but is it a step in the wrong direction? It’s a good first step. Relatively few people get fat off fine dining, because the calories at fine restaurants are much more expensive; fast food restaurants serve a larger number of calories to a larger number of people through a relatively static menu. The regulation is easier for them to implement and provides a substantial informational benefit to the targeted population segment (ie, people who get too many calories from fast food).

  15. chrisjames says:

    @howie_in_az: The original law stated that they had to put the information on in-store menus in NYC locations, but only if they already publicly post that information, like on a website. To skirt the law, they remove the website info, then they don’t have to put it on their cramped in-store menus.

    However, the old rule was scrubbed and it doesn’t matter anymore if it’s publicly posted or not (unless it was changed yet again). I’m guessing Blimpie hasn’t updated everything yet, since it’s a pretty new ruling.

  16. god_forbids says:

    “The internet is a series of tubes.”

  17. ironchef says:

    well their name is refreshing truth in advertising. How ironic.

  18. chilled says:

    weak subject.Get over it.

  19. Whats so hard about making a poster to put next to the order counter, like I’ve seen in multiple McD’s? It’s small type, but hell, at least the information is available.

    And yes, there are people who count calories, I am one of them. This blows they are skirting the law anyway they can. The healthy people who most like NEVER ATE THERE, will, GASP, find out their food has CALORIES, and might ask to hold the mayo and cheese.

    Go Blimpie for supporting a healthy America!

    Most people don’t give a shit, or else will splurge but just wanna know how many calories they gotta burn at the gym, or in my case, starve myself later LOL.

    Get over it, Blimpie.

  20. turi319 says:

    oh hai blimpie nutritions!

    [www.thedailyplate.com]

  21. jchabotte says:

    Welcome to Blimpies, “Fuck you, I’m eating!”

  22. Buran says:

    I fail to see how this affects me here in MO. I don’t care if you don’t want to provide it to people who live in another state. Then don’t. I want it. Don’t want to provide it? I don’t want to shop there.

  23. MystiMel says:

    The smoothie company “Surf City Squeeze” is doing the exact same thing. Here is a quote from their website. This is what you get when you click on the link for nutrition info.

    “Nutritional Information for Consumers in New York City
    We regret that we can no longer publicly post nutritional information on our website.
    This development is a result of the New York City Department of Health’s decision to
    pass a regulation requiring restaurants that already publicly provide caloric information,
    to post product calories on their menu boards – using the same type size as the product
    listing.
    We fully support the intent of this regulation; however, due to the amount of menu items
    we carry, there simply isn’t enough room on our existing menu boards to comply with the
    regulation. As a result, we will no longer be able to provide nutritional information on
    our website or to residents and customers of our New York City stores. We regret this
    inconvenience. If you have questions about this regulation, please contact the New York
    City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and refer to Health Code Section 81.50.
    Nutritional Information for Consumers Residing Outside of New York City
    For years we have provided nutritional information on our website, however due to New
    York City Health Code 81.50, we regret that we can no longer do so. Customers residing
    outside of New York City may contact us at 1-866- 4KAHALA to request nutritional information.”

  24. Hamtronix says:

    Notice how there is no information like this on beer! Its a similar false complaint. the companies claim there isnt enough room to put the required labeling on their packaging. And they have gotten away with it since the law was introduced…