Due to recruitment difficulties, the same guy making sure you don’t bring on more than three ounces of deadly shampoo is now getting trained as a US Air Marshal. [CNN]

Comments

Edit Your Comment

  1. scoopjones says:

    It’s “marshal”, not “marshall”.

  2. astrochimp says:

    @scoopjones: The extra ‘l’ is for ‘low intelligence’.

  3. Phishy says:

    And just as I thought flying couldn’t suck anymore. I pine for the days of people watching in the terminals again. Now the entertainment is replaced with drunken freak outs on planes. Throw in a bunch of ‘trained’ Air Marshalls a.k.a Sky-Mall Cops for good measure.
    Credit to the TSA officers who do make the career change though. Be kind!

  4. AlexSea says:

    It looks like they hired a very low amount of screeners and they kept standards the same they’ve been for 6 years. So yeaah, flying sucks no matter what.

  5. hejustlaughs says:

    I’m waiting until they institute bus marshals or subway marshals.

  6. It’s “marshal.” Eschew the double L.

    This story is old news; the Air Marshal program has been a national scandal since it was first set up, and U.S. News has run a whole series of exposes on the program.

    It’s not surprising that they’re dumbing down the position. That’s happening everywhere, from the military to big corporations.

  7. royceguy says:

    Amazing. I know several people who did security for the USAF who can’t even get INTERVIEWS for the air marshal service…and not due to lack of qualifications. That’s what happens when people are appointed to head agencies based on connections rather than ability.

  8. unklegwar says:

    Good. Instead of a power-drunk jerkoff detaining you at the airport for carrying too much soap, now he can shoot you in-flight. Yay!

    Mix this guy with the jewish man who kept praying. See the problem?

  9. djanes1 says:

    The last time I flew, the guys checking ID and their boss didn’t know a Canadian drivers license was sufficient ID for a domestic flight. It was only a second level of TSA management that could clue them in.