Chase Resets Marketing Preferences, Asks You To Opt-Out Again

Chase will reset everyone’s marketing preferences under the guise of providing “more options to specify which mail offers you do not want.” Remember when you originally opted-out? They didn’t quite understand. What about their Value Added Products And Services and Used Vehicle Financing? Unless you opt-out again by January 24, Chase will acknowledge your implied change of heart. Read their notice after the jump.

http://consumermediallc.files.wordpress.com/2007/12/deceptive_opt-out-thumb.jpeg?w=463&h=620
Has anyone else received these notices? Let us know in the comments.
(Photo: Maulleigh)

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  1. RottNDude says:

    There’s a reason this bank is called “Chase”… that’s exactly what they did to me as a customer – away from their shitty company!

    Oh, and Larry Frankel signs his name like a teenage girl. So there.

  2. homerjay says:

    @RottNDude: Its the Laverne DiFazio “L,” isn’t it?

  3. bsankr says:

    @RottNDude: Lisa Frank…el?

  4. timmus says:

    Maybe Chase should switch to a system where one has to opt out every 24 hours. Everybody “wins”!

  5. Karl says:

    I love the fine print at the bottom. All opt-out choices expire after a maximum of five years. If you move before then, you have to opt-out AGAIN.

  6. SpecialEd says:

    As a customer, I would like the convenience of opting out on an hourly basis. There is a chance that I could change my mind about receiving “special” offers that I might desperately need at any time. Thanks Chase.

  7. hmm, what’s larry frankel’s home phone number? I’d like to tell him my preferences personally!

  8. @RottNDude: I guess we’re lucky there’s no i in his name, or there might be a little heart and/or smiley face.

  9. LadyCarolineLamb says:

    Not sure about the website the letter directs you to. I just went directly to Chase.com, logged into my accounts, and clicked “privacy” and changed the options right there. I wouldn’t give private info to another site, (though it is quite possible Chase would).

  10. laddibugg says:

    I hope they included a SASE…I don’t do paper anymore.

  11. scoosdad says:

    It’s a toll-free fax-to phone number too. Maybe we all need to send them more than one copy of the form just to be on the safe side!

    I’m a Chase credit card customer and to date have not received this letter.

  12. LadyCarolineLamb says:

    By the way… Want to send a special “thank you” to Chase for making their random “fraud alert” checkup calls (at Christmastime) for no legitimate reason. Thanks for ruining the only present I got my husband this year, during the call which consisted of NO unusual purchases (and only a few smallish ones)…but named ONE PURCHASE that one sells ONE THING so that hubby obviously knew what he got.
    Nice time to start those calls, Einsteins.

  13. Squeezer99 says:

    you can opt out online. [chaseonline.chase.com]

  14. azntg says:

    Seriously, why do companies like Chase even give us the option to opt out if they’re going to reset our preferences on a freaking whim? Bleh.

  15. ColoradoShark says:

    @laddibugg: It does says prepaid envelope so they do pay the postage. I highly recommend everyone mail in their forms. This tranfers money from Chase to the post office. Even if you are not happy with the post office, you have to like them more than you like Chase! Processing the paper will also cost Chase more than you doing it online. If they are going to be jackasses about it, you might as well fight back.

  16. ColoradoShark says:

    @Squeezer99: Don’t do it online! It will take you longer and be cheaper for Chase.

  17. GreatCaesarsGhost says:

    @azntg:
    Because they have to.

  18. goller321 says:

    How about adding an addendum to the form stating that the form is permanent, and defaulting on the terms results in a voiding of all fiduciary responsibilities of the card holder. If they choose to not agree to the terms, then they are welcome to cancel the at 3.9% interest until the debt is paid off…

  19. Buran says:

    @Squeezer99: I went to the site and started to do it (I have a credit card from them) and it demanded my SSN.

    WHY do they need that to opt me out!? Fuck that.

  20. Buran says:

    @ColoradoShark: And not faster and easier and cheaper for you? Um OK.

  21. I bet they could SELL the opt-out program for like $5/yr and people would totally buy it (I know I would)

    yeah, im a sheep. baaaaaah fucker

  22. SOhp101 says:

    @Buran: You already gave them your SSN if you have a credit card with them, so stop freaking out.

  23. microe says:

    I got the same letter. Filled it out right then and there. And when I say I filled it out, I filled in every bubble. I have no intention of being a junk mail sink for Chase. And to answer the other poster, there is a SASE with the form.

  24. squikysquiken says:

    Putting aside how asinine the letter is; it is a perfect example of corporate online stupidity. Anyone notices that the website they give is new and doesn’t even contain the name chase anywhere. How do they expect to teach customers not to fall for phising when their own letters look suspicious. The FIRST step in protecting your customers from phising it to make sure all your online activity go through the SAME and UNIQUE website you own. Citibank is guilty of the same thing with their accountonline.com credit card website.

    Honestly, after reading it once, I did thought it was a phising attempt. “Yeah we need to you to update something, so go on that weird website that looks like chase.com and enter a bunch of personnal info so we can verify who you are before we let you update that important opt-out information”. I would have reported it as such and ignored the letter. I guess that’s the goal.

  25. squikysquiken says:

    I’m a Chase customer and I didn’t get that letter (yet) but I just read Buran’s comment about asking for SSN (I wasn’t even comfortable filling the first page to try out) and I think this is even shadier. As far as I’m concerned, this is not a legitimate letter from Chase. (I do realize that it is overly paranoid and that is is probably a legitimate letter especially since it’s probably accompanied with a postage paid return envelope not mentioned in the OP, but nonetheless, it’s bad business)

  26. Rando says:

    Been with chase for 5 years and have not had a single problem.

    Had fraud once ($60 unauthorized internet charge), disputed it, got a $60 check overnighted no questions asked and I was on my way.

    I’ve not received this letter yet, and probably won’t. I never get anything in the mail from them besides college loan offers, which I haven’t opted out of yet because I’m busy.

  27. CarlR says:

    Thanks

    I haven’t seen the letter, but I just used that web site to opt out of all their USPS spam-o-grams.

  28. ColoradoShark says:

    @Buran: They gave you a piece of paper with everything already filled out and an envelope. While I like to do things on line, I sincerely believe picking up a pen and making a few marks on a piece of paper and stuffing it in the envelope they also gave you is faster. It will take slightly more effort to get it to a mailbox but there is one right next to where I pick up my mail.

  29. LisRiba says:

    Yes, I did receive that form letter in the mail. I’m not happy about it; thanks for the link to the online opt-out form above.

  30. msbeer says:

    @scoosdad: Sure, cost Chase more money so they can pass it on to you, the account holder, in the form of increased fees. Way to stick it to the man!

  31. scoosdad says:

    @msbeer: I see, and Chase sending us junk mail that wasn’t asked for is saving Chase money how?

  32. coren says:

    I wonder what happens if you put your junkmail in the envelope Chase sends you?

  33. jenl1625 says:

    @Squeezer99: Thanks for the link. I was having fits trying to find it on the site.

    It didn’t ask me for my SSN, but I was already logged in on another tab. Are the folks getting the SSN request being asked to register to access the account online?

  34. iamme99 says:

    Read the fine print at Chase all the time.

    They keep sending me those checks that I can draw against my credit line. I’ve used them a couple of times in the past for short-term loans at like 1%-3% interest. The fee to use these checks used to be something like 3% with a $100 maximum. A few months back, I noticed that they have now eliminated the maximum. I won’t be using their checks anymore with no maximum fee limit.

  35. vastrightwing says:

    Due to the long cold winter, I’ve decided to opt-in to every mail offer I can. It makes my home warmer by burning all the paper I get. Seriously, I didn’t realize how much paper I get each week until I started collecting it in my fireplace.

  36. espertus says:

    I once successfully sued a company for sending me marketing email in which they acknowledged that I had opted out but were telling me anyway. See [people.mills.edu]

  37. SpanktheUser says:

    One of the nice things about getting older and more affluent is that you can do something about crap like this. I just got off the phone with Chase — I’m pulling my accounts and moving to a smaller, local bank here in Chicago. I’ve spent the last 10 years building a business that is now rapidly growing — still small in the grand scheme of things, but between my business accounts and personal accounts, enough to have a banker personally assigned to me. I let them know exactly why I was switching (I’d gotten their mailing too) and pointed them to this page. I doubt it will do much good, but maybe there’s a chance that someone outside of a call center will learn about it.

  38. Identity says:

    Either they’re your marketing preferences or they’re Chase’s marketing preferences.
    If a click on a website is legally equivalent to a signature, then resetting someone else’s marketing preferences is equivalent to forgery. I know there’s zero chance of getting a judge to look at it that way, but how about maybe breach of contract. After all, they promised to honor your choice and are not living up to that promise.

  39. srrg says:

    I’m late in responding to this because I only received the notice this week. It was mailed to an address I haven’t lived at for 10 years! It is currently a rental and I had opted out of all the mailings years ago. However, the address must still appear on my credit report due to the mortgage on the property. The last thing I want is for my tenants to start receiving credit card offers in my name!! That’s why I had opted out in the first place and I never would have found out except for that my current tenant happened to save the mail for me.