Cargill Recalls 1 Million Pounds Of Tainted Beef

Agribusiness monster Cargill is recalling 1 million pounds of beef that may be contaminated with E. coli. The potentially tainted meat was butchered between October 8 and October 11 at the “Cargill Meat Solutions” slaughterhouse in Wyalusing, PA. According to Cargill, there have been no reports of illness. After the jump, the long list of recalled products.

  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Century Farm 80/20 Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 11/03/2007.
  • 3.0-pound packages of ”Century Farm 80/20 Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 11/03/2007.
  • 1- pound packages of ”Century Farm 80/20 Ground Beef Patty.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Century Farm 85/15 Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 11/03/2007.
  • 3-pound packages of ”Century Farm 90/10 Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/19/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Century Farm 90/10 Ground Beef Patties.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 11/03/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Century Farm 90/10 Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 11/03/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Century Farm 93/7 Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 11/03/2007.
  • 1-pound packages of ”Century Farm 96/4 Extra Lean Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/19/2007 or 10/31/2007.
  • 1-pound packages of ”Century Farm 85/15 Ground Beef Patties.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date 10/19/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Century Farm 93/7 Ground Beef Patties.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 11/03/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Century Farm 80/20 Chuck Ground Beef Patties.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 11/03/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Century Farm 80/20 Chuck Ground Beef for Chili.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007 or 11/03/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Century Farm Meatloaf Mix, Beef, Pork and Veal with Natural Flavors.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/19/2007, 10/22/2007, 10/31/2007 or 11/03/2007.
  • 1.25- pound packages of ”Giant 75/25 Ground Beef, All Natural.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 11/03/2007.
  • 3.0- pound packages of ”Giant 75/25 Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007.
  • 1.25-pound packages of ”Giant 80/20 Ground Beef, All Natural.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 11/03/2007.
  • 3.0-pound packages of ”Giant 80/20 Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Giant Eagle Ground Chuck Beef Patties 80/20.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/19/2007 or10/22/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Giant Eagle Ground Beef Patties 92/8.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/22/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Giant Eagle Ground Beef Patties 85/15 – Certified Angus Beef Brand.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/19/2007 or 10/22/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Giant Eagle Ground Round Beef Patties 85/15.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/19/2007 or 10/22/2007.
  • 3.0-pound packages of ”Shop Rite, 80% Lean 20% Fat, Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007 or 11/03/2007.
  • 3.0-pound packages of ”Shop Rite, 85% Lean 15% Fat, Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007 or 11/03/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Shop Rite, 93% Lean 7% Fat, Ground Beef Patties.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 11/03/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Shop Rite, 93% Lean 7% Fat, Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 11/03/2007.
  • 1-pound packages of ”Shop Rite, 96% Lean 4% Fat, Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007.
  • 1.25- pound packages of ”Stop & Shop 75/25 Ground Beef, All Natural.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007 or 11/03/2007.
  • 5.0- pound packages of ”Stop & Shop 75/25 Ground Beef, All Natural.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 11/03/2007.
  • 1.25-pound packages of ”Stop & Shop 80/20 Ground Beef, All Natural.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007 or 11/03/2007.
  • 1.25-pound packages of ”Stop & Shop 85/15 Ground Beef, All Natural.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007.
  • 1.2-pound packages of ”Stop & Shop 87/13 Ground Beef Sirloin, All Natural.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007.
  • 1- pound packages of ”Stop & Shop 90/10 Ground Beef, All Natural.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007.
  • 1.0-pound packages of ”Stop & Shop 80/20 Ground Beef Patties, All Natural.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 11/03/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Stop & Shop 80/20 Ground Beef Patties, All Natural.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 11/03/2007.
  • 2.6-pound packages of ”Stop & Shop 80/20 Ground Beef Patties, All Natural.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 11/03/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Stop & Shop 90/10 Ground Beef Patties, All Natural.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007 or 11/03/2007.
  • 2.5-pound packages of ”Stop & Shop 90/10 Ground Beef, All Natural.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/19/2007.
  • 2.5-pound packages of ”Stop & Shop 93/7 Ground Beef, All Natural.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007.
  • 1-pound packages of ”Wegmans 80/20 Ground Beef Patties.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/19/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Wegmans 90/10 Ground Beef Patties.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/19/2007 or 10/22/2007.
  • 3.0- pound packages of ”Weis Premium Meats, 73/27 Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 11/03/2007.
  • 1- pound packages of ”Weis Premium Meats, 80/20 Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007.
  • 3- pound packages of ”Weis Premium Meats, 80/20 Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007 or 11/03/2007.
  • 1-pound packages of ”Weis Premium Meats 85/15 Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007.
  • 2.0 and 3.0 -pound packages of ”Weis Premium Meats 85/15 Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 11/03/2007.
  • 2-pound packages of ”Weis Premium Meats 93/7 Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 11/03/2007.
  • 1-pound packages of ”Weis Premium Meats 93/7 Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007.
  • 1-pound packages of ”Weis Premium Meats 96/4 Ground Beef Extra Lean.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Weis Premium Meats 90/10 Ground Beef Sirloin Patties.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Weis Premium Meats Meatloaf Mix, Beef, Pork and Veal with Natural Flavors.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Weis Premium Meats 80/20 Ground Beef for Chili.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Meat Loaf Mix, Made with Beef, Pork, Veal, with Natural Flavors.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/19/2007 or 10/22/2007.
  • 1.25-pound packages of ”Meatloaf Mix, A Blend of Fresh Ground Beef, Pork & Veal, All Natural.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007.
  • Various weight packages of ”85/15 Coarse Ground Beef for Chili Meat, All Natural.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007.
  • 1.3-pound packages of ”Ground Beef Chuck for Chili 80/20.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/19/2007 or 10/22/2007.
  • 1.3 pound packages of ”Price Rite 85% Lean, 15% Fat Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 11/03/2007.
  • 1.3 pound packages of ”Price Rite 80% Lean, 20% Fat Ground Beef.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 11/03/2007.
  • 1.3 pound packages of ”Price Rite Meat loaf mix.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/207 or 11/03/2007.

E. coli can cause bloody diarrhea, stomach cramping, and other nastiness as described by the CDC.

1 mil. pounds of beef possibly tainted by e-coli recalled [AP]
(Photo: hans s)

Comments

Edit Your Comment

  1. Rando says:

    Jesus christ…..this is getting ridiculous. I just made chili and ate some. Now I have to check into what kind of meat I used.

  2. bohemian says:

    Blech. It is also really confusing to figure out if the ground beef that does not bear a store brand label is from the same place. Most of our local supermarkets have those tubes of hamburger with an indentical color coded label signifying the fat content but nothing identifing where it was made at.
    I only buy what is ground at the meat counter anymore.

  3. ChrisC1234 says:

    I think it’s time for the animal rights activists to go after these large meat producers. I love eating meat just as much as anyone else, but I don’t like that millions of pounds of it keep getting recalled, just to be thrown away, because some big company wanted to save a few bucks. How many thousands of animals were needlessly slaughtered. I’ve got no problems killing animals to eat them, but to kill them just to throw them away is wrong.

  4. catnapped says:

    Chances are, if the ground beef you bought came in one of those deep plastic or styroform trays (with plastic over it), it came from Cargill.

    Bon apetit!

  5. catnapped says:

    @ChrisC1234: Not to worry…if they start running low on cattle, they can just start grinding up horses or illegal aliens and sell that. They just need to add some preservatives and brine and most people would never know the difference!

  6. DrGirlfriend says:

    Going after foie gras is a lot more chic than tackling the monster of a problem that are our slaughterhouses and large-scale meat producers.

  7. TechnoDestructo says:

    There are some business buzzwords that just should not be used in certain places.

    “Solutions” should not be used with “meat.” I see “meat solutions” and I envision dissolved meat…or something like that meat-shake place that Frylock worked at in an episode of Aqua Teen Hunger Force.

    Or maybe the factory specializes in making broth and gravy…those are meat solutions, I guess.

  8. catnapped says:

    @TechnoDestructo: You’re not quite far off…most of the meat Cargill packages has some sort of brine solution added to it for color/preservative as well as to pad the weight of the product (less meat=more PROFIT$$$$)

  9. lostsynapse says:

    This is why I only eat my cow in jello form.

  10. 7j6cei says:

    Just one more reason I made my chili tonight with ground turkey from whole foods….. :)

    Ummmmmmmmmm

  11. savvy9999 says:

    What this shows to me is that no matter what store you buy anything at, it all originates from the same place.

    I can understand that a box of Cheerios at Giant is the same as a box of Cheerios at Weis, but completely differently branded meat all comes from the same shit factory?

    This is quite perturbing.

  12. martybird57 says:

    Okay, so I have some of this meat: 1.2-pound packages of ”Stop & Shop 87/13 Ground Beef Sirloin, All Natural.” Each package bears a Use by/freeze by date of 10/31/2007 – – except the expiration date is seven days later. Can’t think of a single reason why I shouldn’t be concerned. Can anyone tell me why I shouldn’t demand a refund?

  13. Simpoleca says:

    This is one of the reasons why I purchase my Beef directly from the source… The Farmer! But I also refuse to spend 40.00 on a steak.. the only people making money on beef sold in stores is the packer (Cargill in this case) I pay the farmer 2.00 per pound (this is the “dressed” weight) and the butcher gets .40 per pound. Hands down the best beef you can get and you save a fortune doing it!… not to mention the farmer get paid more then the packers would be willing to pay.. I see it as a win win..

    I normally get 3 friends involved and we each take a quarter of the animal.

    Try and purchase a roast @ 2.40 Per pound, a Steak for 2.40.. hell even Extra Lean Ground beef…

    For those of you wondering the animal is federally inspected.. and the butcher is just that.. pick a butcher you feel comfortable with and have the animal sent there.

    Moral of the story is…

    Support your local farmer, cut out the middle man and save some money in the process.

    Simpoleca

  14. Scazza says:

    What? No mention of “we believe canada is somehow to blame” in there? As per always (although, it is true that it happens…

  15. TeraGram says:

    Dearest Scazza,

    We love the Canadians. It is the Chinese that are trying to poison us with their trains.

    I see how you could be confused, though. They both start with C.

  16. Consumerist Moderator - ACAMBRAS says:

    @catnapped:
    The grinding up horses thing probably offended a few people; the grinding up illegal aliens offended a lot of people. Cool it, please.

  17. solipsistnation says:

    It’s a great time to be a vegetarian.

    (Except for the occasional e coli in the spinach, I guess.)

  18. Simpoleca says:

    Seeing how it is Hockey Night in Canada… and I am Canadian.. Can I say this here??

    GO LEAFS GO!

    Ok ….. please be gentle.

  19. tadowguy says:

    @SOLIPSISTNATION: Green onions are notorious as well.

    @nobody in particular: Since the grocery stores track us with their irritating cards, coulnd’t they give us a call or an email about stuff like this? I make most of my ground beef into patties and then freeze it.

  20. CumaeanSibyl says:

    @ChrisC1234: Agreed. Such a terrible waste of food that could have actually, y’know, fed people if they hadn’t screwed it up.

    @tadowguy: The Meijer grocery chain actually does this — there was a story about it here a few months ago. They give you a printed-out warning with your receipt.

    @Consumerist Moderator – ACAMBRAS: Seriously. Everybody knows natural-born citizens taste better anyway. Soylent Green: now with more Americans!

  21. HungryGrrl says:

    :P And I’m in the midst of reading “The Omnivore’s Dilemma” right now. I think it’s gonna be only grass fed organic beef for me for now on…

    The less corn-fed factory beef you need, the less oil is needed by the US economy, meaning lower gas prices and LESS WARS!

  22. HungryGrrl says:

    and by ‘need’ I meant ‘eat’… >-~

  23. DallasDMD says:

    Horse meat is actually quite tasty and is a delicacy in countries other than the United States.

  24. JayDeEm says:

    I read the company name as Callgirl and was initially very confused about this recall.

  25. ironchef says:

    just cook the damn thing. sheesh.

    E Coli dies when meat is properly cooked.

  26. XianZomby says:

    What causes e. coli to enter the food chain is sloppy processing of an animal, which is caused by the disassembly line too fast, which is caused by Americans that want more meat at a lower cost. A byproduct of moving the disassembly line too fast is worker injury, in some cases inhuman conditions for animals, and in some cases meat with bacteria. Meat companies want to irradiate food for this very reason. If you could irradiate, you could move the line a hell of a lot faster and not worry about worker safety, animal welfare or food safety. Because that blue glow kills everything. And also because the Americans that think they need a quadruple Whopper don’t flinch when they hear an uninsured, non-union, illegal alien meat processor got his arm taken off by some contraption at a Cargill or ConAgra facility. They only want to know what the hell is going on in those places if their burger makes them sick.

    Of course, if people would learn to cook their food the right way, this wouldn’t be a problem at all.

  27. trillium says:

    Some e.coli cooking facts:

    While E. coli is a contaminant capable of causing severe disease, it can be effectively controlled by thorough cooking. Cook ground meats (beef, pork, veal, lamb) to a uniform internal temperature of at least 160 °F, non-ground meat cuts such as roasts and steaks (beef, veal, lamb) to an internal temperature of at least 145 °F, non-ground pork to 160 °F, and all poultry to 165 °F. Reheat foods to 165 °F. Keep hot foods at or above 140 °F and cold foods at or below 40 °F.

  28. BigNutty says:

    Just cook the dang meat completely through. That’s why I nuke everything I cook in the microwave. Of all the food that is processed for us, it’s amazing there are not more problems.

  29. jamar0303 says:

    @JayDeEm: My god- I laughed so hard when I thought that too.

  30. vegetarians, your asses are next

  31. timmus says:

    I like how “All Natural Beef” is mixed in there with “Coarse Ground Beef for Chili Meat”. What’s going on here… do they mix up 500-ton batches of ground beef at a time? Or is there a failure to clean the equipment? Either way is pretty gross.

  32. timmus says:

    BTW, where the hell do the restaurants get their beef? Every time there’s a E. coli recall, it always involves supermarket beef and never restaurant beef.

  33. Rando says:

    @catnapped: Son of a bitch. The meat I used was Kroger brand, but it doesn’t state what company where the meat came from.

  34. Simpoleca says:

    @DallasDMD:

    Being a Dutch Canadian we eat Horse Meat quite regularly and your correct is it fantastic!

    Simpoleca.

  35. marsneedsrabbits says:

    We’ve switched to organic meat. It doesn’t seem to be recalled very often.
    And I know this sounds incredibly paranoid, but we don’t cook or serve meat the day we buy it anymore, and haven’t for a while. I buy meat in bulk when it is on sale (organic costs a lot more, so get as much as you can when it is on sale) & stick it in the freezer. I wait at least a few weeks, then thaw it & cook it.
    Twice I’ve had meat that was part of a recall, and after the second time, I started doing this to give enough of a “lag” to make sure it is safe.
    Chicken is the only exception, because it doesn’t seem to be an E-coli risk as much as a handling issue when people get sick from chicken. I do buy organic chicken, but will cook & serve it the same day.

  36. @7j6cei: Exactly – mine was made from boneless, skinless chicken thighs, though.

    Did we all have chili this weekend?

  37. theblackdog says:

    @xianzomby: A few years ago I read a quote from a guy that makes a pretty good summary on why there needs to be more than just using irridation to keep our meat safe.

    “After all, sterilized poop is still poop.”

  38. speedwell (propagandist and secular snarkist) says:

    @discounteggroll: I’m a vegetarian. You wouldn’t want my ass. Too much waste once you trim it to anything useful for a rump roast.

  39. MrEvil says:

    cook your dang ground meats people. Its as simple as that. Again, e.coli is only bad with ground beef because the e.coli is mixed throughout the package. With solid cuts like steak or roast the e.coli is only on the outside of the meat (it can’t get in) so if you rinse off your steaks and roasts (I do) and throughly cook on the outside you’re safe there too. For ground product ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS cook all the way through. If you go to a restaurant, send back a burger or ground meat item if it’s not done all the way through, never order anyway but well done.

    It’s far easier for consumers to properly prepare their dinner than it is for the meat packing industry to make sure the lines are absolutely hospital sterile.

  40. FLConsumer says:

    As much as proper cooking can render the bacteria harmless, the O157:H7 e.coli shouldn’t be there in the first place! Meat packing houses need to clean their plants more than once a day (or week!). The number of recalls this year has been ridiculous.

    I still think we need to force-feed these meat packing plant execs and supervisors tons of e.coli, esp. the O157:H7 strain (responsible for the hemmorhagic diarrhea) and THEN we’ll see all sorts of changes.