Verizon Says It Will Only Share Your Info With Other Verizon Companies

Verizon says the information sharing opt-out notices it sent to customer, that we told you about a month ago, are only so other Verizon companies can market discounted service bundles, and is not for resell to third-party advertisers.

After stories about the notice appeared on Slashdot, ArsTechnica, Digg, Gizmodo, and others, Verizon clarified its position with a press release and a post on its policy blog. Jim Gerace, VP of Corporate Communications wrote, “Verizon Wireless does not sell personal customer information to third-party advertisers. Period.”

The Skydeck blog, whose initial post spurred the pickup by larger blogs, told The Consumerist, “The CPNI notice came attached to the new Verizon Wireless Ts and Cs, which explicitly grant VZW permission to share information (defined as CPNI) with vendors and third parties to, among other things, deliver relevant advertising.”

Whether the advertising comes from Verizon or from other companies, we’re sure most Consumerist readers “do not want.” The number to optout is 1-800-333-9956.

PREVIOUSLY:
Verizon’s Plan To Share Your Call Data Generates Blog Scrutiny
Opt Out Of Verizon’s Scheme To Sell Your Personal Info To Marketers
(Photo: Maulleigh)

Comments

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  1. I will remind you that to DoNotCall list is limited in that companies associated with the company you do business with can call you for 6 months after last date of even an inquiry. Basically, for 6th months post inquiry, you’re fair game.

  2. FLConsumer says:

    What makes sharing the data with “other Verizon companies”, whatever the hell that means, makes this idea any more palettable to consumers? After spending $100/mo, I think I’ve paid enough and don’t think I should be forced to further subsidise a large company’s bottom line through adverts. I hate when companies do that. (Intuit/Quicken, are you listening?)

    Also, screw whatever Verizon’s PR people say. Ultimately, whatever’s in the contract is what matters. According to the NY Times, the new T&C reads:
    In a separate service agreement accompanying the notice sent to Verizon customers, Verizon said it was authorized to share information with “affiliates, vendors or third parties” for services purchased by consumers. “By using the services you expressly authorize us to use your information,” the agreement said.
    After defining consumer network information, the agreement goes on to say that the company “may include our own or third-party advertising in the services you’ve purchased from us, and we may share information about you with affiliates, vendors and third parties” to “deliver relevant advertising to you while using the services.”

  3. kimsama says:

    Thanks — I got the notice but had been lazy about opting out. You got my dander up again and I just did. This is what Consumerist does best — remind us not to be complacent. ^_^

  4. Falconfire says:

    its very simple to opt out. I did it sunday myself and for my other line.

    The only annoying thing I would say is you have to plug in EVERY phone number you own, instead of it blanketely opting out of the account it’s self.

  5. mattbrown says:

    “Verizon Wireless says…” you mean. Mass hysteria. That’s what the policy stated in the first place. I no longer believe in that I have any privacy; so a company that’s telling me that it will share information within it’s company, something I thought already was happening, myeh.

  6. aikoto says:

    Damned opt-out policies. It’s a load of crap and should be illegalized.

  7. noquarter says:

    I just got my notice about this from Verizon yesterday. What confuses me is that it was a notice of a change to the terms of my contract with them, the new terms allowing them to do this BS.

    Perhaps I don’t understand what it means for a contract to be a contract, but it seems like they shouldn’t be able to change the terms part way through any more than I can. And I can’t. That aspect of this whole thing offends me more than the “selling my personal information” aspect of it.

  8. snazz says:

    @FLConsumer: if Verizon didnt do this subsidization, you would probably have to pay a lot more than $100 a month.

  9. noquarter says:

    @snazz: Why? Is Verizon Wireless losing money? They’re a very profitable business, and any reasonable person who’s been paying attention to the companies in this country knows that such arguments are specious.

    Any changes on their part that enable them to take in more money will only serve to make them more profitable. At no point will that translate to discounts for end users.

  10. FLConsumer says:

    @snazz: Sounds good to me, where do I sign up? I’ve long said on this blog that I’ll gladly pay for service, including privacy.

    And no, it shouldn’t cost them more. Cut back on their advertising campaign and they could easily recoup the money. I’m not saying stop advertising, rather, saying they should do it wisely. I see at least one full-page colour advert of theirs in the NY Times every single day. The contents of which usually provides no motivation to use Verizon whatsoever. (I still do my mobile + mobile data through Alltel, who doesn’t pull this crap, is less expensive than Verizon, doesn’t nickle & dime me like Verizon does, AND has better coverage than Verizon.)

  11. rhombopteryx says:

    “”Verizon Wireless does not sell personal customer information to third-party advertisers. Period.””

    Now, give it away no questions askedto the NSA, yeah, we can do that.

  12. ohadi says:

    I called Verizon’s main customer service number. They denied any knowledge of the opt out procedure. Thanks for posting the opt out number. I used it for all my Verizon mobile phone numbers for our family. BTW – like many Verizon customers we have a contract through an employer/group discount program. I see no reason to subsidize Verizon’s marketing efforts given the type of account we have.

  13. BuzzDar says:

    How can verizon share your information with other verizon companies when they cant even share your account information with each other.