Bentleys 520 Arnages (wrong bolts attached to the wheels), Gilchrist & Soames 0.65oz/18ml hotel toothpaste (poison), Eastern Illini Electric Cooperative Recalls Junction Boxes (fire), Giftco Gold Pine Cone Candle Sets, (fire), Bosch Skil Circular Saws (laceration), Classic Beauty Rest Electric Warming Throws (fire).

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  1. bohemian says:

    The Gilchrist & Soames recall really irked me. I see more expensive supposedly high end products getting caught up in these recalls. They are frequently things you would not assume were made in China.
    If your interested in what hotels were handing out possibly poisoned toothpaste this page has a partial list of the hotels.
    [gilchristsoames.com]

    This got me wondering about some of the other products we had at home. I had some hotel bottles from our last vacation. They were nice products but when I looked, nothing mentioning where they were made. Hey, even most cheap toiletries say where they were made.
    Their website does not mention anywhere I could find either.
    [www.porticospa.com]

    I found a rather expensive bath product I purchased a few months ago is indeed made in China. At least the bottle and website admit it.
    [www.worldmarket.com]

    The toothpaste appears to be made in the US.
    [tomsofmaine.custhelp.com]
    Though they are less detailed about where they get the base ingredients.

  2. Jon Parker says:

    Isn’t a circular saw that has the potential to cause lacerations a feature, not a bug?

  3. Darn, I guess I have to bring my Bentley in for servicing… what a pain.

  4. bilge says:

    @pfblueprint: Butler on vacation?

  5. FLConsumer says:

    I’m actually VERY surprised to see a recall on a Bentley. Having been to the factory in Crewe, England and spending time with the engineers and workers, a mistake like this will be taken very personally.

  6. revmatty says:

    “They are frequently things you would not assume were made in China. “

    The goal of most companies is to produce goods as cheaply as possible and charge the maximum price they can get away with. Why would you assume something isn’t made in China because it’s expensive? It just means the company is making an even bigger profit on it because their costs are lower.

    While people gave Kathy Lee a hard time about her clothing lines being made in China, you’d be amazed at the high end designers who also have their stuff made in China. And in most of those cases the labels do not say “Made in China”.

    Most of them take advantage of a ploy that was very popular for US companies in the 70’s and 80’s (and is still prevalent but not ubiquitous any longer) in which 90% of the work is done out of country but the final product is assembled in country and thus says “Made in France” or “Made in Canada” or “Made in U.S.” even though it was actually made in China or Mexico.

  7. sporesdeezeez says:

    @revmatty: As a Harley owner, your comment makes me think, “Hey, that sounds just like my bike!”

    Just once in my life I’d like to buy a domestic vehicle and not have that mean I need both metric and SAE wrenches. At least with an import I can just use metric.

    An alternative, of course, is we could adopt the frickin’ metric system, but nooooooo. That would be un-American! And if I talk about it too much, next thing you know Rush Limbaugh will be measuring everything in Freedom Feet and Yankee Yards.