Amp'd Mobile Shuts Down Tomorrow, Port Your Number Today!

Amp’d Mobile will shutter its ailing service on July 24th at 12:01 am, meaning that today is the final day to port your number to another carrier. The mobile virtual network operator has worn a giant “Kick Me!” sign ever since it filed for bankruptcy after half of its 175,000 customers failed to pay their bills; securing its fate, Amp’d costs Verizon $370,000 per day and owes the telecommunications behemoth over $56 million. The goodbye text Amp’d sent its customers, and information on porting your number, after the jump.

According to Gizmodo, Amp’d customers received the following text over the weekend:

What happens to my Pay As You Go minutes? If you have an outstanding unpaid credit, rebate or refund due to you, to be considered for payment, you will need to file a claim. Please see http://chapter11.epiqsystems.com/AMI for more information.

What happens to my Hybrid plan minutes? If you have an outstanding unpaid credit, rebate or refund due to you, to be considered for payment, you will need to file a claim. Please see http://chapter11.epiqsystems.com/AMI for more information.

The links lead to Epiq Bankruptcy Solutions, the liquidators relieving Amp’d of its assets. Before dealing with them, evacuate your number to a different, stable operator. For an easy step-by-step guide to porting your number, click here.

Customer Questions And Answers [Amp'd] (Thanks to Diana!)
Amp’d Mobile Shutting Down July 24, Prepayers Beware [Gizmodo]

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  1. Sidecutter says:

    Always did thing the commercial with the girl talking about all her stuff she got, and how it was “only” $50 a month, was rather stupid. Especially since she’s talking about it saying she can’t afford anything else, but could have gotten a plan from most real carriers for $25-35. No wonder their customers couldn’t pay their bills if they thought $50/mo was a low rate.

  2. enm4r says:

    Verizon should have never picked up the service to begin with. Has anyone figured out why they did? Or why they needed to ask permission to stop footing the bill for customers?

  3. socialmisfit says:

    Verizon was prevented from dropping them by the bankruptcy court. As a pay-as-you-go customer, I’m only scrambling to find a new carrier to port my number to. At least I hadn’t just added a bunch of credit to my account.

  4. krom says:

    How does number portability work when the carrier goes under? I presume their number blocks are part of what’s up for auction; if your block is bought by a non-wireless carrier, how does WNP even work? My understanding is typically WNP is handled the same way roaming is done.

  5. mupethifi says:

    See what happens when you market to young punks who don’t have jobs and have no idea what responsiblity is.

  6. lestat730 says:

    I find it very strange that so many of Amp’d customers just didn’t pay their bills. I always thought not paying bills led to bad credit, fines, loss of whatever service you were supposed to be paying for and possibly legal action. So how is it that the majority of their customers just ignored their bills? Even more, how did they end up attracting so many people who never paid up?

  7. peggynature says:

    I hope they shut down operations in Canada soon, too. Every time I pass their store downtown, I’m offended but the utter sleaziness of its advertising.

  8. Employees Must Wash Hands says:

    @lestat730:

    I find it very strange that so many of Amp’d customers just didn’t pay their bills. I always thought not paying bills led to bad credit, fines, loss of whatever service you were supposed to be paying for and possibly legal action.

    There are people who don’t pay their Verizon, Cingular, or Sprint bills, too. They get their service cut off and their accounts get turned over to collections, indeed. The difference is that Amp’d had an astounding 40% account delinquency rate (according to that article: 200K subscribers at the time they filed bankrupcy, of which 80K weren’t paying their bills). I googled around for info on the other carriers, but couldn’t find anything. We can safely assume other, profitable carriers are nowhere close to that, though.

    Even more, how did they end up attracting so many people who never paid up?

    The “hip kids” to which they marketed are probably the same people who already have outstanding collection accounts with every other carrier and thus couldn’t get cell service from anyone at all until they settle their bills.

  9. socialmisfit says:

    @krom:

    The numbers amp’d was using were from Verizon’s block. Unfortunatly, my service was disconnected at noon today (so much for that midnight deadline) and I lost my number before I could get it ported. On the plus side, I was able to activate my phone with Verizon’s InPulse service until I can find a better soultion. I greatly appreciate their fine service in getting my amp’d razr activated but their pay-as-you-go prices are just not competitive.