iTunes DRM-Free Music Selling Like Crazy?

According to the Inquirer, sales of “Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon increase by between 272 and 350 percent… OK Go’s Oh No increased 77 per cent. Coldplay’s A Rush Of Blood To The Head jumped 115 percent.”

It’s too soon to call it, but those figures are encouraging. —MEGHANN MARCO

EMI has DRM free sales boom [Inquirer via BoingBoing]
(Photo: Wikipedia)

Comments

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  1. MandM813 says:

    What is DRM?

  2. firestarsolo says:

    Digital Rights Management…do a search for it on here or anywhere else, everyone has been covering it, talking about it, and collectively hating it…

  3. firestarsolo says:

    Sorry for the double post, but this may help you out the most:

    [consumerist.com]

  4. ElizabethD says:

    Yay for OK Go!

  5. Indecision says:

    This doesn’t surprise me much. Just last week I made my first online music purchase ever, only because I found a legitimate site selling high-bitrate (320k CBR) MP3 files without DRM.

    Not only could I easily have found the tracks I purchased online, but I actually already had most of them. I bought the whole album anyway, because I wanted to support both the artist, and the idea of DRM-free downloads.

    If you like electronic music, check out BeatPort.

  6. scoobydoo says:

    I had some cash in my iTunes account, and Pink Floyd was the first thing I purchased. :)

  7. urban_ninjya says:

    Looks like the popular 70′s practice of watching the Wizard of Oz, listening to Pink Floyd, and enjoying Magic Brownies still lives strong today.

  8. Spartan1308™ says:

    It makes sense as there are tons of people w/out Ipods that would like to be able to purchase music through Itunes. Ipods are overpriced compared to most of the other players available.

  9. agent2600 says:

    beatport rules, but its more expensive then itunes or other music stores because you pay an additional built in fee for rights to preform it, thats why it is aimed at DJs.

  10. juri squared says:

    Hooray for OK Go! Oh No is a great album and I highly recommend it.

    As for my library of 60-70 songs from iTunes, there was precisely one song that was available DRM-free: “Karma Chameleon” from Boy George. I don’t know whether to laugh or cry at that.

    (Before you ask, I have the OK Go album on CD, not from iTunes.)

  11. consumer_999 says:

    Well that’s good news. I hope more will start to follow this model (of course they will), taking the hint that, “If you don’t treat them like criminals, they will come.”

  12. snazz says:

    it may be DRM-free but apple still embeds a unique signature into each file that marks it specific to the purchaser. should the file distribute illegally, theyll know who it came from.

  13. mathew says:

    I went from buying 0 albums on the iTunes music store to buying 2 in the last couple of weeks. I plan to buy more.

  14. LionelEHutz says:

    I’ve been using eMusic.com for a while now precisely because they are DRM free. It’s focus is on independent labels though. I never though about it before, but I wonder how RIAA free eMusic is.

  15. LionelEHutz says:

    @agent2600: Beatport is an excellent service that also integrates with Native Instruments Traktor DJ software. I’ve actually been buying the .wav files from time to time too.

  16. Indecision says:

    @agent2600: “beatport rules, but its more expensive then itunes or other music stores because you pay an additional built in fee for rights to preform it, thats why it is aimed at DJs.”

    Personally, I’m willing to pay a little extra just to not have DRM. Doesn’t matter to me who it’s “aimed” at if I can still benefit.

    I might look in the iTunes library to see if they have some of the same tracks I’m looking at for future purchase, but to be honest, I don’t like having to download the iTunes software just to browse and buy tracks that I’m going to want DRM-free (meaning I won’t want or need iTunes to play them).

  17. arachnophilia says:

    do you think that the record companies will put 2 and 2 together, and realize that restricting how people use they stuff they paid for makes people not want to buy things?

    or at the very least that they’re making more money without drm?