Amway's Baaaaaaccck!

Like a sequel to a horror movie, the Amway brand name is bursting out of a shallow grave, reports ABCmoney:

The move also was widely viewed as a way of helping the company shed some of the negative connotations the Amway name had acquired. The Quixtar name, however, never resonated with the public.

‘Research has shown us that the Quixtar name is weaker and less known in the U.S. and Canada than we ever expected,’ the memo said. ‘Meanwhile, even eight years after leaving North America, the Amway name is stronger and better known than we realized.’

Multi-Level-Marketing brandwashing is like Lady Macbeth and her damn spot. — BEN POPKEN

Amway brand on the way back [ABCmoney] (Thanks to Rampant Octopus!)

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  1. Wasabe says:

    I’m sure the name Hitler is really well known – why not just use that?

  2. sleze69 says:

    I know I may get slammed here (maybe not…my 23 year old girlfriend has never even heard of Amway) but Amway wasn’t such a bad time. I did it for 2 or 3 years active and another few years just buying the soap from my upline. Unlike that pyramid vitamin scheme(who’s name escapes me), people will ALWAYS need the products Amway sells (soap, detergent, paper towels, toilet paper, etc) and as such there will never be a saturated market (unless everyone in the world became distributors).

    As long as people know what they are getting into, there shouldn’t really be a problem.

    - Yes, you have to pay for several hundred dollar startup kit.
    - Yes, ANYONE can become a millionare doing it (look at the diamond membership and you will see a list of about 50% retards)
    - No, most people will NOT become millionares doing it…

    ..In fact, most people drop out and lose money. Why? Because it is hard work AND you end up alienating friends and relatives when you try to show them “the plan.” The reason I stopped was because it wasn’t for me. I like my current job (computer scientist) and don’t like having to keep showing the plan and selling soap.

  3. bluemeep says:

    @sleze69: Unlike that pyramid vitamin scheme(who’s name escapes me)

    That’d be Herbalife, if I’m not mistaken.

  4. chipslave says:

    @bluemeep:

    I thought it was Vibe. Ugh… that stuff tastes gross.

  5. sleze69 says:

    @bluemeep: That’s the one :)

  6. llanim says:

    I think Amway is confusing “well-known” with “notorious.” Their name is not so much well known as used as a generic signifier for pyramid/MLL scam.

  7. Chaosium says:

    @sleze69:

    “I know I may get slammed here (maybe not…my 23 year old girlfriend has never even heard of Amway) but Amway wasn’t such a bad time.”

    You have no concept of all the unpaid hours you put into the company, then.

    If you don’t want to put in overtime at your day job, just buy a book on PC repair and do spyware removal/maintenence for the elderly. Guaranteed money, flexible hours, and you don’t get the crazy “sales eyes” let alone whoring your products out to friends/family.

  8. hemaphore says:

    I thought Amway was a religion… If you listen to their “motivational” tapes (a friend of mine gave me a box of them) there are a lot of references to God and Christ…

  9. badgeman46 says:

    I participated in that research. The research company kept sending me questionaires with questions like “Do you view Amway as “shady”?” It amounted to asking me what Amway would be like if it took human form. Amway would be your sleazy uncle whose nickname was “Dirty” who drove around in a warmup suit selling timeshares.

  10. Tyr_Anasazi says:

    The only way to get rich with Amway is to sell training materials to your downline…

  11. bastarre says:

    I just want them to start selling their XS Energy Drinks (Root Beer Flavor! FTW!) outside of Amway/Quixtar channels. That would make me happy.

  12. sleze69 says:

    @Chaosium: Actually, I am completely aware of the “unpaid time” I put into Amway. Like any person who is self-employed, you generally put in a lot of time when you try to grow the business. What I found was that it just wasn’t for me.

    Along the way, I read many good motivational books that promote good sales and (business) relationship building techniques and practices. Although the tapes they pushed on you were full of “Amway is great” propaganda, I would stop short of calling it brain-washing (atleast in my little group).

  13. asplodzor says:

    Have any of you had any encounters with an outfit called Vemma? (http://www.vemma.com/) It’s a MLM with only one product – a daily vitamin supplement at a cost of something like $60 per month.

    A friend of mine is currently caught up in it and I’m wondering how mainstream / legit it is.

  14. asplodzor says:

    Linkage for the above: Vemma

  15. jerseyjokeboy says:

    Sheesh…I still remember back in high school, I volunteered at my local hospital and a doctor there tried to introduce me to this “wonderful” business. I was surprised to see that a smart guy like that would get involved with a scam that Amway is/was. He even gave me some tapes and reading material with the mandatory happy family on the cover, and their huge house, two Hummers and snow mobiles in the background, just to get me motivated. The tapes were filled with lame motivational speeches and this empty redundant talk on how being rich is super-extra-awesome!

    Heh, and when I questioned him on the whole thing, he became defensive and told me that I was not ready to join his business….hahaha.

  16. Notsewfast says:

    @ sleze69

    My biggest problem with these MLM’s is what their goals are.

    People try to justify the actions of companies like Amway by saying that all business sell things and have high-pressure management.

    While this may be the case, a legitimate business sells a product or service, and dervies its profits form its customer’s purchases or investments made form those proceeds.

    MLM’s seem to have the goal of deriving almost all of their profits from their employees at “discounted prices” (although this is largely debatable, I think there are the reasonable prices that employees pay and the prices the suckers pay.)

    So when you say that there will always be a need for these items unless the entire world is selling, I say that that is where the flaw lies in the whole operation. Wal-Mart can set a goal of making every citizen of earth a customer and will profit when it happens. If the same happens to a MLM (where customers are employees) there is nobody left to buy, just a bunch of people selling the same junk.

    So please don’t try to compare a scam to a legit (albeit only slightly more so in the case of Wal-Mart) business.

  17. Televiper says:

    The problem with Amway is that it’s turned into a get rich by selling motivation for the up line. My parents were and are still in it. They actually started making money when they started just buying the few products the liked, and eventually selling products to disenfranchised former Amway distributors who also liked the product. They actually had the plan showed to them by someone who is in “Quixar” and my mom had to bring out evidence that she was in Amway and Amway was Quixar.

    What really hurts Amway is the small-minded business culture fascism you get from some members. This irritating BS where the are business people, they’re getting somewhere in life, and anyone who doesn’t support them is the enemy. People aren’t sold an honest portrait of building a business in multi-level marketing. They’re taught that they need to spend a gross amount of money on motivational tapes instead of the standard practice of balancing the books. What really damaged Amway was the Network systems set up by the Diamond distributors. That’s where most of the hot air tapes came from.

  18. rlee says:

    15+ comments, and no-one has noticed: “a horror moving”!?!?

  19. factotum says:

    I’ll stick with Costco, thanks. One package of toilet paper and paper towels lasts me a year and knowing that Costco caps their markups at 15%, I know I’m not getting ripped off.

  20. G-Dog says:

    Say what you want, but Amway has really helped my town of Grand Rapids survive these past couple decades.

  21. BobbyMike says:

    Amway has a bad name, not because they make baad products, but because of the actions of quite a few of the “Independent Business Consultants” who market their products.The products are ok, not the be all and end all.

    I won’t ever do business with them because they allow shady consultants to make money with their “educational and motivational” business tapes and meetings. “Business Builders” make the majority of their money by convincing others to buy business related materials and then lie about their motivation for doing so.

    There is a lot of “plausible deniability” involved.

    Google the name “Dexter Yager”, “InterNet Services”, and “Lawsuit”. He’s a horrid little man who “revolutionized” the business by figuring out a way to shill those motivational tapes, books, and meetings alongside the products in a parallel pyramid scheme. He’s a racist, misogynistic, homophobic hypocrite (my own personal interpretation from listening to him speak over a period of 7 years).

    Unfortunately they give a bad name to real Christians because of their profession of their so-called faith.

  22. jothar says:

    Rickross.com lists Amway as a cult.