Bank CEO Uses NYPD As Personal Thugs

NYC citizen Jeff Boyle called the CEO of Valley National Bank at home to complain about some illegal construction noise. The CEO Gerald “Don’t You Know Who I Am” Lipkin, rather than apologizing for the racket, “flipped out.”

According to the NY Post, Boyle’s version of the story goes like this: After numerous calls to 311 about the noise, Boyle called Lipkin’s listed number to complain. Lipkin “flipped out” and shouted, “I have no control over what goes on! You’re violating my privacy!”

Lipkin then had his security chief contact the NYPD, convincing them to launch an investigation of Mr. Boyle. A detective came sniffing around Boyle’s place asking his neighbors for personal information. We’d call that a far more serious invasion of privacy than simply calling a listed phone number, but that’s us. We’re not important bank CEOs.

Boyle was told by the NYPD that he didn’t actually commit a crime, but was warned, “Don’t do that again.”

Boyle says, “I was stunned. I didn’t do anything illegal. For the CEO of a bank to use the NYPD to get in a pissing match with me, for Gerald Lipkin to try and intimidate me this way, is outrageous.” It certainly is. He adds, “…For the NYPD to waste New York taxpayer dollars over a private matter just because some guy decides to throw his weight around is a violation of public trust.” We agree. Valley National Bank is run by a douchebag of the highest order. —MEGHANN MARCO

FAT CAT’S WRATH AT WAKE-UP CALL [NY Post via Gothamist]

Comments

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  1. dbeahn says:

    Anyone want to post that listed number? My guess is there’d be calls from far outside the jurisdiction of the NYPD ;)

  2. timmus says:

    Turnabout is fair play. Send a bank detective to investigate the CEO’s neighbors. The icing on the cake is that the CEO is likely a lot more prone to social embarassment.

  3. velocipenguin says:

    Why bother posting it when it’s still publicly available?

  4. homersays says:

    Wow, this is very scary. I live around the corner from this and I have called 311 to complain about noise stemming from a different situation a few times. What would happen if this guy was on probation? They could throw him in jail for police contact even if he wasn’t doing anything wrong.

  5. mantari says:

    If you do make a call, please don’t spoof your caller ID information.

  6. Buran says:

    @mantari: Seems like failing to do so these days gets you investigated for doing nothing wrong …

  7. BillyMumphry says:

    Who does this lipkin guy think he is? What kind of pissant bank is Valley National? 12b in assets? That’s a small-medium hedge fund. A senior portfolio manager at SAC or Third Point and the like could buy and sell this guy 10x. And God help him if Daniel Loeb comes sniffing about his company. NYPD should have told him to go fist himself.

  8. jeffislouie says:

    I understand that what I’m about to post wont go over well.
    But this phone call was made at 5am.
    That would cause me to flip out as well. It wasn’t the CEO who was responsible for the construction noise and the call should have been made to corporate headquarters during business hours.
    Truth be told, the call should have been to the city, not the CEO.
    Get them fined instead of having some bigshot with connections at the nypd try to ruin you for waking him up with trivial crap he had nothing to do with.
    Granted, the NYPD should never have been involved and Jeff Boyle should file a complaint with the police department, but next time, don’t call at 5 am and CALL THE RIGHT PERSON….

  9. eldergias says:

    Lipkin: “Help Police! Someone called my listed phone number to complain about something illegal that the company I am responsible for is doing!”

  10. Ryan Duff says:

    Google Phonebook

    But you didn’t hear it from me…

    Name and home town are both in the NY Post article.

  11. eldergias says:

    @jeffislouie: If that is true, then you are correct that the CEO is justifiably pissed off for being woken at 5am, but consider that the reason Jeff was awake (and pissed off) at 5 am was because of the illegal actions of the company the CEO is responsible for.

    The article does say Jeff made repeated calls to 311, but it seems that there must have been no headway.

    Even considering if Jeff was wrong to call at 5am and that the CEO couldn’t have done anything about the noise (I don’t believe that for a second, if the noise was outside the CEO’s it would take one call and 10 min for it to stop) how does the CEO think he has the right to set the police on someone for ONE call at 5am? Sure, if Jeff called repeatedly and harassed him it would be justified, but ONE call? No.

    And the police saying, “Yeah, what you did wasn’t illegal, but don’t do it again (I am the law! {Sly Stalone voice})” Mighty BS.

  12. lpranal says:

    @Consumerist

    can we get (at least a link to) ol’ Gerry’s email addy posted? I’m sure the lovely readers would be more than overjoyed to voice their support for Jeff (and, of course, the NYPD)

  13. DeeJayQueue says:

    @jeffislouie:
    Hmm, RTFA, it says he and others in his building made numerous calls to 311 and the 10th precinct to no avail. You’re right though, 5am isn’t a great time to call, it would annoy the shit out of me. Kinda like a construction crew starting work outside my window at 5am. Right.

    Ultimately it IS the CEO’s responsiblity to make sure that the construction crew that his company hires follows local ordinances and doesn’t make too much noise too early in the morning. He is responsible for the decisions that everyone in his company makes, including hiring and firing contractors that don’t follow the rules. If the construction company consistently starts work at 5am, then they should not only get fined but they should get fired as well.

    Is a branch manager going to have the power to fire a contractor? No. Is he going to even give a crap? No. Those decisions are made at a corporate level, by a faceless drone VP who you can’t get a hold of. So, who better to contact at corporate than the CEO himself. Especially when this particular CEO has a LISTED phone number. I say when the construction crew starts working at 5am, call his number and just stick the phone out the window.

  14. othium says:

    Am I the only one who has an “off” setting on my phone’s ringer switch? If I don’t want to get calls when I am asleep, I turn the thing off. When I wake up (and after my coffee) I turn it back on again. Voice mail takes care of anything that happens when I am getting my much needed rest.

  15. Skeptic says:

    Clearly it would be a bad idea to cover the construction site with hand bills featuring the CEO’s contact information…nice BIG hand bills.

  16. Buran says:

    @jeffislouie: Maybe so, but having the police investigate someone calling you at 5AM? How is that worthy of police effort? Calling someone at that hour isn’t illegal, much as someone may not like it. Correct response on the part of the police was “I’m sorry, sir, phone calls are not illegal. Take it up with the caller.”

  17. FinanceGuru says:

    @jeffislouie: What planet are you from? The CEO is responsible for what happens on his watch and he certainly has the authority to make this stop.

    Is corporate governance not something you’re familiar with at all??

  18. jeffislouie says:

    To all-
    Yes. Calling at 5 am is not the right thing to do. Period. No, the CEO is not directly responsible for what a construction crew is doing at one of his banks – he likely didn’t hire them and he sure doesn’t monitor them or have much at all to do with them. No, the police response was not appropriate (Jeff should call the police and file a beef with them over it). No, calling 311 didn’t do anything, but then he should have called 911 (at least that’s what we have to do in Chicago to get anything done about noise violations). Yes, the police should have taken the initial complaint call seriously and actually done something about it.
    No, I don’t think calling a branch manager would do anything. BUT, one could write a letter to the CEO at the corporate office – or better yet, a letter to the CEO’s home.
    Not sure why people are reacting to my post by reiterating what I said while trying to make me look like a buffoon, but hey – it’s all good.
    Calling the CEO at 5 am won’t make a damn bit of difference and all of you know it.
    If I was CEO and got that call, I’d likely have just ignored it and made sure my number was removed from 411 listings.
    BUT, if I started getting letters from angry residents surrounding the bank and calls were coming in to my offices about it, I might care.
    If the city repeatedly fined me I would DEFINITELY pay attention.
    Which is why people should start calling 911 to report the noise violations. Every time it happens. Then write a letter to the police captain explaining that you are very upset that they aren’t taking it seriously.
    Annoying someone because a company they work for doesn’t make it better, usually.
    Call corporate headquarters, during business hours, and you’d likely get a much different response.

  19. lamorevincera says:

    Several things were done wrong here. I have no doubt that the situation was highly frustrating, but calling the man at home at 5 AM was an invasion of privacy. It wasn’t illegal, and part of me thinks the CEO is asking for it by keeping his number public, but it was terribly rude and crossed a definite line.

    Far worse, though, was the CEO’s response to all this. The NYPD is not his personal goon squad, and that was an absolute waste of the city’s resources.

  20. jeffislouie says:

    @FinanceGuru:
    I’m from beezlebroks 95328, a distant planet where we take personal responsibility for being disproportionally rude to people when we are inconvenienced.
    The CEO IS responsible for what happens on his watch. But isn’t that like yelling at the CEO of Comcast because the phone rep was rude?
    Sounds like overkill to me.
    Perhaps calling the police and corporate headquarters might get the job done. But calling the CEO at home at 5 in the morning is not going to do much, except for making you feel better and allowing for an amusing story on a blog.
    “Corporate governance is the set of processes, customs, policies, laws and institutions affecting the way in which a corporation is directed, administered or controlled. “
    Again, yes ultimately the CEO is responsible for what the company does. But in this case, the worst person to bother.
    Unless, of course, you are tired and frustrated (in which case you get a nasty response) or an immature blog reader hell bent on behaving childishly.
    I will say this in a less polite way – calling someone at 5 am is stupid, especially someone as disconnected from the issue as the CEO.
    There are proper channels to go through to get this done. Blasting the CEO at 5 in the morning isn’t one of them.
    I feel for Jeff, but disagree with the idea that anytime something happens that you don’t like, you can do whatever you feel like to correct it.
    If your HP laptop crashes and you lose all your data, do you go looking for Mark Hurd?
    Of course not.
    In this case, the correct thing to do was to call the police, then contact the corporate office of the bank to complain.
    I might think differently if he had already contacted corporate, but that doesn’t seem to be the case.
    By the way, what planet are YOU from?
    Seems like an odd question.

  21. eldergias says:

    @jeffislouie: “Annoying someone because a company they work for doesn’t make it better, usually.”

    Agreed. However, annoying someone because the company that works for them [is doing something bad] can easily make it better, usually.

    There is a huge difference between someone who works for a company and someone that a company works for.

  22. jeffislouie says:

    @eldergias:
    Fair enough.
    But one might consider the idea that reporting the problem to the corporate office and giving them a chance to deal with it is a better idea than calling the CEO at 5 in the morning.
    It reminds me of my days running restaurants. People would have a bad experience and instead of calling me, the GM, so I could deal with it, they would email the owners. The owners would either: a) ignore it or 2) flip out and call me to correct the issue. Every time, I could have and would have handled it immediately.
    Again – calling corporate is a reasonable response. Calling the CEO at 5 in the morning is not.

  23. eldergias says:

    @jeffislouie: “Perhaps calling the police and corporate headquarters might get the job done. But calling the CEO at home at 5 in the morning is not going to do much, except for making you feel better and allowing for an amusing story on a blog.”

    “The irony, said Boyle and his fellow sleep-deprived neighbors, is that they have complained, to no avail, about the noise to the city’s 311 help line and the 10th Precinct station house. (City law prohibits construction work before 7 a.m., but residents said Valley National crews have started much earlier.)”

    Well, they called the city’s help line, and the police, and considering that Corporate offices are not open at 5am, who else would you suggest they call?

    Can you honestly tell me that you believe that if the same construction crew was doing work outside the CEO’s home at 5am on something for Valley National Bank that he would not be able to do anything about it to get the noise to stop? If so, then I am amazed that you think the CEO is that powerless. If you think that he could, then calling him after already having called the city and the police was the appropriate action, unless you can name some other number that the residents could have called at 5am to reach someone to get the noise to stop.

  24. jeffislouie says:

    @eldergias:
    “Well, they called the city’s help line, and the police, and considering that Corporate offices are not open at 5am, who else would you suggest they call?”

    I would suggest, as I have since my first post, that they call the police (which they did) and then call the corporate offices to complain during normal business hours.
    Same as I have said over and over again. Call the police while the problem is going on. If they don’t respond, file a complaint with the police department.
    I’m not familiar with NYC, but in Chicago we have alderman who we can bother when the police refuse to do their job. A few calls into an aldermans office usually results in them making a stink with the local police district and something being done.

    “Can you honestly tell me that you believe that if the same construction crew was doing work outside the CEO’s home at 5am on something for Valley National Bank that he would not be able to do anything about it to get the noise to stop? If so, then I am amazed that you think the CEO is that powerless.”

    I never said he was powerless. I said that Jeff called the wrong person. A CEO is in charge of the big picture of a company. Construction nuisance calls are not usually his realm. Plus, as we saw in this story, calling him results in nothing being done and a seriously pissed off CEO. That’s it.
    He CAN do something, but calling him at 5 am likely will only very very rarely result in anything being done.

    “If you think that he could, then calling him after already having called the city and the police was the appropriate action, unless you can name some other number that the residents could have called at 5am to reach someone to get the noise to stop.”

    Well, they could have gone down there and asked them to stop and threatened to call the police.
    And, it seems, doing what they did resulted in nothing being done anyway – so what are we discussing here?
    Oh, right. I think calling the CEO of a company because some branch is being built at 5 am is inappropriate behavior and you think it is genius and can only result in immediate change.
    So- I think it should have been handled differently and you think it was handled correctly.
    We can see that the way it was handled didn’t result in the situation being fixed.
    So what exactly is your point?
    How can you continue to say that calling the CEO at 5 am is the best way to deal with this? Did it work, even a little bit, in this instance?

  25. JustThisGuy says:

    @jeffislouie: I’m sorry, but did you just recommend that one should call 911 to report what is, at best, an inconvenience?

    Hey, look: I think calling at 5am is inappropriate too. There are better, more appropriate channels to take. I also think the CEO’s response was overkill, but still. However, your suggestion is mind-bogglingly selfish and, to a certain extent, completely idiotic.

    Good job, champ.

  26. JustThisGuy says:

    @jeffislouie: this might pop up as a double post. If it does, I apologize. That said, I cannot believe that you’re actually recommending that a person call 911 for what is, at best, a minor inconvenience. How incredibly selfish and ignorant behvaior.

  27. sam says:

    @jeffislouie: this might pop up as a double post. If it does, I apologize. That said, I cannot believe that you’re actually recommending that a person call 911 for what is, at best, a minor inconvenience. How incredibly selfish and ignorant behvaior.

    I’ve actually called 311 before to complain about immediate noise complaints (car alarms going off for more than 20 minutes, etc.), and they have specifically told me to contact 911 (and even transferred me), because that is the only way to send a patrol car to check out the situation and issue an immediate violation. Now, maybe this isn’t appropriate in every situation, but it’s not an entirely ridiculous suggestion.

  28. Skeptic says:

    lamorevincera says:

    Several things were done wrong here. I have no doubt that the situation was highly frustrating, but calling the man at home at 5 AM was an invasion of privacy.

    Uh, no. Calling some on a publicly listed phone number at 5am might be in appropriate, if done repeatedly it might be harassment but it is not an invasion of privacy. You misunderstand the word “privacy” in the legal context.

  29. jeffislouie says:

    @JustThisGuy:
    “I cannot believe that you’re actually recommending that a person call 911 for what is, at best, a minor inconvenience. How incredibly selfish and ignorant behvaior.”
    “However, your suggestion is mind-bogglingly selfish and, to a certain extent, completely idiotic.

    Good job, champ.”

    Okay.

    Well, that was nice.
    Any more names to call me? Perhaps you want to throw in an ‘jerkwad’ or ‘a-hole’?
    How about this: I live in Chicago and have had to call in noise violations in the past.
    Each and every time, I called 311.
    Each and every time, they connected me to 911 and advised me to use that number instead.
    So, care to maybe jump in the river or maybe stick your finger so far up your nose you get a headache?
    Jackass.
    911 is usually EXACLTY who 311 directs you to to take care of noise violations.
    311 is a nonemergency line, that’s true, but in order to dispatch a car to deal with the problem, the 311 operators are trained to direct the person to 911.
    It isn’t selfish, ignorant, or even remotely idiotic.
    However, posting that it is when you are clearly the one who is ignorant IS.
    I’m starting to remember why I don’t post here… People like you.
    Unbelievable.
    Hey, want to tell me how selfish I am for calling 911 when I get into a car accident too? That’s awful selfish too…
    Putz.

  30. jeffislouie says:

    @JustThisGuy:
    by the way, if calling 911 is selfish – what is calling the CEO at 5 am exactly?
    Oh. Right.
    Justified.
    Stuff it…

  31. eldergias says:

    @jeffislouie: Please direct me to where I stated that it is genius and can only result in immediate change?

    As soon as you do, I will concede how wrong I am, specifically because I do not believe that statement remotely.

    I think that it could result in immediate change, since the CEO IS the most powerful man in the company. As as with the example you gave of the owner coming down on you, can bring about changes swiftly if desired. But I would not believe that the ONLY possible outcome of calling somebody at 5am would be to get them to do exactly what you want them to. That is a pretty illogical conclusion.

    We are talking about what a person can do at 5am to get illegal noise pollution to stop.
    So it is right now 5am and you want it to stop and to go back to sleep, you can:

    1) Call the police
    - We both agree this is the right thing to do. The tenants did it and nothing happened.
    2) Call the city.
    - We both agree this is the right thing to do. The tenants did it and nothing happened.
    3) Call the corporate offices.
    - It is 5am, they are not open. As per Customer Service, the corporate office hours are from 8am to 5pm. Since they are not open at 5am there is nothing that calling them could possibly gain you.
    4) Call the corporate offices in three hours (8am)
    - That does not and cannot help me right now, during the crime, and while I should be sleeping. Doing something later cannot, by definition, help me right now in the present.
    5) File a complaint with the police department.
    - Terrific, great, I agree. How is this going to help the noise stop right now? Sure, it could get the cops in trouble when the complaint is reviewed, but how exactly could that complaint stop the noise right now so I can go back to sleep?
    6) Call the alderman
    - We don’t have one of those around here to the best of my knowledge, but do you have a number that would allow you to reach him at 5am? You said to call his office and they will make a stink. Do you think his office is open at 5am? I seriously doubt it. Again, nice thing to do later, but it does not help me get to sleep and stop the noise right now.
    7) Call the CEO.
    - As you agreed, he is not powerless to stop the noise. He is in charge of the company, he would know who to call to get the noise stopped, even if it was not his responsibility to personally stop the noise. He has the power, connection, and means to get it stopped and he can be reached at 5 am. It turns out that he does not want to use that power, connection, or means to stop it, but he has them.
    8) Go down to the construction site and threaten to call the police.
    - So, get out of bed, get dressed, leave the building, walk/drive to where the construction is taking place and threaten them with an action that has already yielded you no results, so that you can go back to sleep after you are already wide awake and have lost an hour of the time you should have been asleep getting ready and trying to stop the noise that was keeping you from sleeping?

    So far, all of the possible options both you and I have suggested are listed above. 1, 2, and 7 were tried and did not work. 3, 4, 5, and 6, could not possibly result in immediate action because there is no one at any of those offices to respond to the calls received or the action is one that takes place at a later time. 8 is threatening an action we already know doesn’t work, to a foreman that we have to find, after getting dressed, making our way to the construction site, and becoming completely awake. This defeats the point of wanting to make the noise stop now so they can return to sleep.

    What do you suggest be done AT 5AM to get the illegal noise to stop?

    If it was 5am and I had tried 1 and 2, and knew that 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 could not possibly result in immediate action, or had tried them and found that they could not (due to office hours) then yeah, I think #7 is a good idea. And until you can suggest something better, which you repeatedly say you have, yet your better idea could not possibly stop the noise right now, then I am sorry, but you are wrong.

    “So what exactly is your point?”
    -My point is that the correct action was taken after exhausting the other possible alternatives, which you clearly disagree with.

    “How can you continue to say that calling the CEO at 5 am is the best way to deal with this?”
    -Because if you have exhausted all of your other options that could lead to immediate satisfaction so you can return to sleep, and this is your only other option that could yield the correct results, then it is the best action to choose.

    “Did it work, even a little bit, in this instance?”
    -No it didn’t, but that doesn’t mean that it was a bad choice. If someone begs for a dollar from you for food and you give it to them, and as they are going off to get food they have a heart attack, was your charity a mistake? No. Just because an action does not produce the intended results does not mean that logically it was not the correct action to take given the information at hand.

    My final question is why are you getting angry?

  32. Trackback says:

    Local · Cemusa makes bus stops and newsstands stylish [Apartment Therapy] · The CEO of Valley National Bank is an asshole [Consumerist] · Attention to journalists who hated on the Tom Ford flagship: you’re just too poor to understand such luxury [Fashion Inc.] National · How to…

  33. ncboxer says:

    I think Jeff Boyle was obviously frustrated that he and his neighbors had been repeatedly woken at 5 am. What did he do to “try” to remedy the sitation- he called 311 multiple times and the police precinct to no avail.

    What should he do then- try to contact someone with Valley. It has been suggested in comments that he didn’t call the right person at Valley. How exactly is he to know the right person at Valley to call? Now, me personally, I would have contacted a branch manager at a Valley bank and asked who I could talk to get this stopped.

    Ultimately the CEO is responsible for his company or other companies that do work in his name- this other company was doing work on his bank. I would argue that the annoyance of a 5 am call is a lot less than the annoyance of repeated construction work that starts at 5 am (and doesn’t stop like one phone to the CEO). Like I said, it wouldn’t have been my 1st choice, but I completely understand why he did it and he shouldn’t have been treated the way he was.

  34. asherchang says:

    (973) 263-2323
    (973) 263-4579

    just in case.

  35. Ass_Cobra says:

    Did anyone read the article? The CEO called his head of security. The head of security is the one that called the NYPD. Chances are that the head of security for a bank in the NY metropolitan area either served in the NYPD or in a department in a surrounding community. He then used his connections to get the head of Major Crimes investigation to look into this. I agree that it’s a complete waste of city resources but I doubt thoroughly the CEO sicced anyone on anybody. This is douchy on both sides. Calling people at 5am is dick, regardless of how justified this guy may feel and using the police to enforce what is a personal disupte is abusive. As has been pointed out before, maybe a call to the Valley National bank at a reasonable hour would have worked. Or perhaps calling the CEO after dinner would have worked better?

  36. jeffislouie says:

    @eldergias:
    I’ll start at the bottom, then retire while laughing….

    “My final question is why are you getting angry?”

    Well, I would say that would be because of this:

    JustThisGuy says:
    “your suggestion is mind-bogglingly selfish and, to a certain extent, completely idiotic.

    Good job, champ.”
    and then:
    “How incredibly selfish and ignorant “

    And financeguru says:
    “What planet are you from?”
    All because my perfectly reasonable responses don’t include me waking up a CEO and his entire family at 5 AM.

    The rest of your post seems to agree with me, save for one point, and I believe that you and I are simply looking at it from different perspectives.
    the one point – You think calling the CEO of a bank, one who owns what, 168 branches , at 5 AM, at home has even the slightest chance of making an immediate change in a situation.
    Never mind that he may live in New Jersey, or Upstate, or whatever. But do you really think that the CEO of a company that big has the phone number for the contractor who is working on a branch location readily available?
    Seriously. Here’s my deal:
    The way I see it there are two forms of remedy here- immediate and long term.
    Immediate remedies are exactly the following: Call the police, walk down there and ask the contractor to cut it out until 7. That’s it. Everything else can only result in nothing happening or nothing happening for a few hours.
    Period.
    The other, more important form of a remedy would be to file a formal complaint with the police department and or let the company know (just once might be enough) that it is happening. Based on the information provided in the blurb, we don’t know if Jeff even contacted the banks corporate HQ to let them know. ((800) 522-4100 )

    Really – take a minute to remove yourself and your personal distaste for me or whatever. Think about the reality of the situation, not what COULD or MIGHT be true, but the situation as presented.
    It’s 5 AM. You get woken up by construction. You call the police and they don’t do anything. The noise continues. Do you:
    a) Go down and ask them to stop until 7
    b) call the police again
    c) Deal with it, get up, eventually call the bank to report the early construction and then call the police to file a formal complaint
    or
    d) Go to your computer, look up the CEO’s name, call 411 and get his number and call him at home at 5 in the morning.
    Which of these sounds reasonable and which sounds like someone is immature?

    “Call the alderman
    - We don’t have one of those around here to the best of my knowledge, but do you have a number that would allow you to reach him at 5am?”

    Well, let’s see. No. But then, I’m an adult and think that the only place you should call at 5 am isn’t anyone I wasn’t sure wouldn’t be upset with that sort of call.
    My mom.
    My girlfriend.
    My dad.
    My brother.
    My grandfather.
    And only then if it was an emergency.
    And you DO have people like aldermen.
    I believe these people are called Borough President’s (I may be wrong). But from what I can tell, these people are in charge of the areas you live in and are supposed to make sure things are correct.
    http://www.nyc.gov/portal/site/nycgov/menuitem.ebba9f255b4
    Find yours today!
    Also, an appropriate reaction might include calling the department of buildings. They might be interested to hear that a bank is under construction in violation of their codes.
    Let’s get back on track – This bank sucks. We should google bomb them!
    Better?

  37. jeffislouie says:

    btw, I think the point of the story was that the CEO’s security chief is a schmuck for calling the cops. Stupid, dick move.

  38. neuromantic says:

    i wish i could say that i can’t believe 311 would tell someone to call 911 in a non-emergency… unfortunately, i well believe it. nonetheless, it’s WRONG. if i’m not mistaken, calling 911 in a non-emergency situation is, in fact, illegal. it’s like not pulling over to allow an ambulance through, because you can’t get good reception on your radio. i really can’t stress this enough.

  39. EtherealStrife says:

    d) Go to your computer, look up the CEO’s name, call 411 and get his number and call him at home at 5 in the morning.

    Well I would’ve looked up the number while I was online, but otherwise that would’ve been my response. Sometimes the only way to get results is to piss somebody off. This guy already went through all the proper channels. Nobody was helping him. By calling the CEO right when the construction crews showed up, he was simply demonstrating his situation. The difference being, all the CEO had to do was hang up and he could go back to bed. Not so for those trying to sleep around the construction site.

    And the coup de grace: this jerkoff CEO woke his security chief up at that early hour, just to get back at the residents.

  40. Helvetian says:

    @eldergias: I agree completely. I am in full agreement that the CEO has the power to get it stopped. I would have done the samething and infact contacted the CFO of a major financial lending institution at home once. He was stunned, but had my problems corrected. He didn’t call the police on me or security. This CEO is horrible.

  41. eldergias says:

    @jeffislouie: Very well, how about a better question: “Why are you angry at me?” At what point did I insult you or berate you?

    The only things I have said to you have been about my disagreeing with you, why I believe you are wrong, and supporting my own opinions. I will completely agree with you, the people who berated you were jerks, but what is it that I did to you that warrants your hostility to me?

    I am glad we are in agreement with everything but that one point. And I understand your side, you think calling the CEO of a bank, one who owns what, 168 branches , at 5 AM, at home doesn’t even the slightest chance of making an immediate change in a situation.

    For this to be true you would have to believe one of 2 things:

    1: The CEO is incapable of getting the contractor to stop at 5am.
    2: The CEO would never do something for another person at 5am.

    You have already alluded to the fact that the CEO is capable of getting contractors to stop working at 5am, and I hope you would be reasonable enough to concede that almost certainly if this annoyance was taking place outside of the CEO’s home he would have a way of remedying the situation rapidly.

    Since it is reasonable to believe that the CEO is capable of getting the noise stopped, then you objection would rest on your belief that there is not even the slightest chance that the CEO would want to stop the noise if he was called up about it at 5am.

    I know people hate it, but lets go to extremes. You really believe there is a 0% chance that the CEO would do something to stop the construction noise if someone called him at 5am? What if the CEO normally gets up at 5am? What if the CEO is an insomniac? What if the CEO is a very compassionate person? What if the CEO really wants to make customers happy and go “Above and Beyond”? What if the CEO does not want to be called at home about the noise again so he gets it to stop? If any of those are even remotely possible, then there is even the slightest chance of making an immediate change in a situation. And I cannot imagine a rational, intelligent person frankly and honestly stating that all of the above possibilities I presented were totally impossible.

    “Think about the reality of the situation”

    Realistically, if someone called me at 5am and said, “Hi, I live across the street from you and your downstairs light is shining into my bedroom window and is keeping me awake, could you please turn it off?” I would think he was odd, but I would be courteous enough to turn it off, then plop back into bed. Does that make me crazy?

    “Which of these sounds reasonable and which sounds like someone is immature?”

    All of the options you presented have merit, and none are immature. Also, is it really necessary to imply that I am immature for supporting one option that you do not?

    “Well, let’s see. No. But then, I’m an adult and think that the only place you should call at 5 am isn’t anyone I wasn’t sure wouldn’t be upset with that sort of call.”

    Do all adults imply that people who disagree with them are children? If so, then I hope I never become an adult. I’m 24 now, so let me know when I should start to get worried. Also, triple negatives are atrocious when people are trying to read your writing. That is not a mark against you, I have horrible grammar, but it is something to note, and when people point it out politely, it can help get me into better habits.

    As a child, I guess my view of calling people who could put an immediate stop to illegal activities when the police refuse to help would make sense. Us kids are so silly.

  42. eldergias says:

    @jeffislouie: “I believe these people are called Borough President’s (I may be wrong). But from what I can tell, these people are in charge of the areas you live in and are supposed to make sure things are correct.
    http://www.nyc.gov/portal/site/nycgov/menuitem.ebba9f255b4
    Find yours today!”

    By the way, I don’t live in New York, so I am still not certain if there is anything akin to an alderman for my area.

  43. Greasy Thumb Guzik says:

    @jeffislouie:
    I too live in Chicago & you don’t know what the hell you’re talking about!
    You call 311 on a noise complaint knowing full well that they transfer you to 911.
    The idea being that when they see that 311 has transfered you to them, they can’t get mad at you for calling directly & dumping your call into the bottom of the line where it might never get taken care of.
    Then you’ve got to be there to make sure that the cops that show up know that they need the ordinance ticket book for this. Most Chicago cops don’t have that book in their cars.

    As for calling the alderman, hahahahahaha!
    The election is over, they have three & a half years to keep ripping us off until the election season rolls around again. Those weasels are counting on most people forgetting what they haven’t done!

  44. synergy says:

    What kind of place trains 311 operators to dump you to 911?? Anytime I’ve ever called 311 about noise complaints they take my info, contact the PD themselves, and a cruiser is dispatched. I am NEVER shuttled to 911 whose operators are for EMERGENCIES ONLY. That’s just insane. And defeats the purpose of 311.

  45. jeffislouie says:

    @eldergias:
    No.
    I didn’t allude to the fact that the CEO can put an immediate stop to a contractor working in one of his 168 branches.
    I said it was highly unlikely that he could anything immediate. Chances are high that he has no idea the name of the contractor, much less the phone number, anywhere near his home.
    We disagree. Leave it at that.
    You say:
    “For this to be true you would have to believe one of 2 things:

    1: The CEO is incapable of getting the contractor to stop at 5am.
    2: The CEO would never do something for another person at 5am.”

    1) Absolutely. Well, maybe not incapable, just unwilling or unable.
    As I said before, this is the CEO of a pretty large company. If it was Joe’s hardware opening a second store, sure Joe the CEO would have the contractors number. But not the CEO of a company this large.
    2) Why WOULD the CEO do anything at 5 am if he could? Because you think he cares? It’s 5 am, some jackass is calling him at home about a noise violation from a work crew that he is no where near. Calling the corporate office would have a guaranteed effect. Calling at 5 am is, at best, a long shot.

    “Do all adults imply that people who disagree with them are children? If so, then I hope I never become an adult. I’m 24 now, so let me know when I should start to get worried. “

    No, but all adults understand that there are right ways and wrong ways to do things.
    Common courtesy is at play here, which unfortunately became an adults only thing is our world of entitlement and disassociated parenting. See, I was raised by parents who instilled in me boundaries, one of which was when it is okay to call other people. Never after 10 pm (unless, of course, we’re talking about friends or emergencies) and never before 8 am. Unfortunately, we have allowed, as a society, the individual to be tethered to work in spirit, mind and body. Instead of leaving for the day, the CEO who isn’t bright enough to keep his home number unlisted is fair game to bother at home over a noise violation that could have been stopped after the first occurence by calling the right people that day (corporate headquarters, the building department of NYC, the police etc…).
    But that’s not what happened and certainly not what you are so adamantly advocating. You think that if you call the police and nothing gets done, it is perfectly reasonable to call the CEO at home. Fine. I disagree and, so far, not one person has been able to list a valid reason for such a call, save for to vent frustration.

  46. jeffislouie says:

    @eldergias:
    “By the way, I don’t live in New York, so I am still not certain if there is anything akin to an alderman for my area.”

    If you live in a big city, try looking for city departments. There is some sort of local representative in every major city in the US.
    If you live in a smaller town, there is likely a village president.
    If you live in a gated community, there is probably a homeowners association.
    There is someone who has the power or ability to escalate issues that get ignored.
    Or, if you really want me to do the work for you, tell me what city you live in and I’ll get the information for you. That way, you can’t say ‘I don’t think I have anything like that’ anymore.

  47. jeffislouie says:

    @Greasy Thumb Guzik:
    “I too live in Chicago & you don’t know what the hell you’re talking about!”

    Okay. Enlighten me as to what the ‘hell’ I’m talking about then.

    “You call 311 on a noise complaint knowing full well that they transfer you to 911.”

    That’s what I said, because I don’t think a noise complaint is an emergency. Of course, NOW, after going through this a few times only to be transferred over to 911, I call 911 directly.

    “The idea being that when they see that 311 has transfered you to them, they can’t get mad at you for calling directly & dumping your call into the bottom of the line where it might never get taken care of.”

    I’m sorry – are you implying that 911 gets mad at people for reporting noise complaints in Chicago? They don’t. You are incorrect.
    Are you implying that a 911 call might never be taken care of?
    Usually, and I know you are way smarter than I am, I wait less than 60 seconds no matter how I come to 911.

    “Then you’ve got to be there to make sure that the cops that show up know that they need the ordinance ticket book for this. Most Chicago cops don’t have that book in their cars.”

    Again, you are wrong. Most chicago cops do indeed have the correct ‘ordinance ticket book’, what ever you think that is. And if they don’t, there is always a Sargent nearby who can write the proper citation.
    You are talking out of your rectum, and it is transparently obvious. The main purpose of sending the police wouldn’t be to write a ticket – It would be to get them to stop working and obey the law.

    “As for calling the alderman, hahahahahaha!
    The election is over, they have three & a half years to keep ripping us off until the election season rolls around again. Those weasels are counting on most people forgetting what they haven’t done!”

    Hey, that’s great. And informed. But totally false. A restaurant opened up across the street from my last apartment. Everything was great and we were all very excited to have it open. They rented out the unit above the restaurant for a while. When that tenant moved out, they started hosting all night parties in the space. They would run these parties until 7 or 8 in the morning, playing music loud enough to wake the dead and selling alcohol without the proper permitting. I was getting woken up 3 nights a week and unable to fall asleep at least one night per weekend. I called the police several times. Each time, they would come out, the music would quiet down a bit, and then when the cops left it would return to earsplitting levels. I started calling the restaurant and leaving voicemails on their answering machine. This upset the owner (i had a friend who worked there) but not enough to stop the noise. I didn’t call him at home. Two wrongs don’t make a right.
    Frustrated, I wrote a letter to the alderman about it.
    A week later, the parties stopped. The restaurant was fined and had it’s liquor license temporarily revoked.
    If you ask an alderman to take care of a situation the right way, they will do something.

    By the way, I have personally seen police officers issue building code violations. A building next door to mine had a cease and desist sticker on the building due to permiting violations. A cop happened to be driving down the street when he saw workmen. He stopped his car and issued a ticket.
    Ease up, bro.
    No reason to make stuff up to try and make me look bad.
    I do know what the hell I’m talking about.

  48. jeffislouie says:

    @synergy:
    hello synergy…
    In Chicago, 311 is a nonemergency line.
    In a situation when an immediate response in needed (such as a noise complaint), they need to get that information to 911 so a unit can be sent out to investigate. In a situation like this, there is a law being broken. The police have to catch them in the act, so they need to dispatch the police. 911 operators are trained to ask questions that would assist the police in the enforcement of the law.
    Interestingly, and contrary to greasy thumb’s assertion that aldermen do nothing, most of the services 311 provides can be requested by contacting the local aldermans office (says so on the website:
    “Of course, you can still request these services by calling your alderman or 311. “
    311 is an information line and is used to deal with things like broken streetlights, various inspections, etc. when 911 needs to get involved, sometimes they need to ask more information. For instance, I once called 311 about the noise violation I described above – an illegal night club running out of the unit above a restaurant without the proper licensing and serving alcohol until 8 in the morning. They directed me to 911. the 911 operator started asking me questions – can I see people coming in a leaving now? Is the music playing now? Where is the entrance door? Have I seen people obviously drunk get in their cars and driving around? Do I see any drugs? Etc.
    311 is for information and administrative type of stuff. 911 is emergency.
    But the line gets blurred.
    I think you should call 311 for noise violations.
    But if that doesn’t work, call 911.

  49. eldergias says:

    @jeffislouie:

    “No.
    I didn’t allude to the fact that the CEO can put an immediate stop to a contractor working in one of his 168 branches.
    I said it was highly unlikely that he could anything immediate.”

    Situation: Contractors for the same bank are doing work at 5am outside the CEO’s home. This wakes the CEO up.

    You either think he would have some way of getting them to stop or he would not. Black and white, yes or no.

    “We disagree. Leave it at that.”

    Fine, then you think he would not be able to stop the noise outside his own home. You could have just responded with that the first time I asked and it would have saved a lot of trouble. By the way, incapable and unable would be the same in this situation. If he was just unwilling, then he would be capable.

    “No, but all adults understand that there are right ways and wrong ways to do things. Common courtesy is at play here, which unfortunately became an adults only thing is our world of entitlement and disassociated parenting. See, I was raised by parents who instilled in me boundaries, one of which was when it is okay to call other people.”

    I was under the impression that adults also understand that there is a polite way to discuss things over and an impolite way. And does this common courtesy you speak of include being rude to the people you debate with? See, I was raised by parents who instilled in me manners, one of which was how to deal politely with people in a conversation.

    Further, I was also taught to contact the people necessary to stop crimes when crimes are being committed. Call the police, however this failed. Call the city, however this failed. Lets see, who else could possible stop this crime in progress? Perhaps the people that perpetrators work for? If that is a logical leap tell me how. Sure, the CEO most likely does not know the number of the contractors, but I would bet every penny I have in this world that he would know someone who would, or someone who would know someone else who would, or ect. It doesn’t matter if it is noise complaint or a riot and mass-murder, crimes are supposed to be stopped and punished, and people who have the power and authority to stop the crimes have the responsibility to do so. The police shunned this duty. The city shunned this duty. Who is next in the line? How about the people who they work for. If you don’t care one iota about stopping active crimes, then there really is nothing I can say to change your mind, but then don’t complain if you are the victim of a crime and no one comes to help you.

    By the way, you still never answered my question from before of why you are mad at me. Do all adults get mad at other people because not everyone agrees with them?

    Yet one more reason I hope never to become an adult.

    Also, I’m not saying “I don’t think I have anything like that” to piss you off, just this is the first time in my entire life I have ever heard of an alderman. My town has a “first selectman” which is more akin to a mayor for larger towns. I will look into the town website and see if we have something akin to an alderman. But for god-sakes dude, calm down. Your about ready to pop a vein and I just want to have a conversation. Stressed much?

  50. jeffislouie says:

    @eldergias:
    “Situation: Contractors for the same bank are doing work at 5am outside the CEO’s home. This wakes the CEO up.

    You either think he would have some way of getting them to stop or he would not. Black and white, yes or no.”

    Sure he would. But that’s not apples to apples. He would walk over there, explain that he was the CEO, and they would stop.
    So he (the ceo) would have to DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT. Sort of like Jeff would have to go over there and ask them to stop.
    You know that you just presented an illogical proof to your question. Right?

    So, why am I upset with you?
    Because like many people under 30, you think you know it all. You assume that your way of thinking is correct. Take offense to that or don’t.
    You claim your parents taught you manners, which is fine. But they didn’t teach you that two wrongs don’t make a right? Or is it that you have found a way to rationalize ignoring those manners they taught you as long as it involves a CEO, 5 in the morning, and a construction crew?
    Manner INCLUDE the idea that calling a person at home to complain about something unrelated to him is rude at 5 in the morning.
    CEO. Chief Executive Officer. His job is to run the company from a high level. Granular CEO’s fail, every time. The CEO of this company COULD NOT DO ANYTHING ABOUT THE NOISE EVEN IF HE WANTED TO.
    Why am I getting upset? Because the way you present your argument is based in fantasy, not reality.
    Okay – You are the CEO of a company with 160+ branches. Your phone rings at 5 in the morning. Some guy woke you up to complain about construction on a bank no where near where you live. Let’s just say that in your fantasy, you don’t resent having some jackass wake you up (and your family, maybe your newborn, maybe your dying grandmother) at 5 am. Let’s assume you went to bed early instead of eating a quick dinner and spending the rest of your night poring over documents and planning your next board meeting until 2 am. Let’s say you went to bed early and you wake up and are moved to do something immediately to resolve this noise violation that, for all you know, could be a prank call.
    You spring into action.
    But you don’t have the name or phone number of the contractor. Bob, the vice president of real estate, might! So you call Bob. He doesn’t answer. You call again. No answer. So you leave a voicemail. Bob calls you back 15 minutes later. Time is of the essence! It’s now almost 5:30 and you know that Jeff is being annoyed by the noise! Oh MY! Bob doesn’t have that information on him at his home. Being the dedicated employee, he gets dressed and SPEEDS to work, getting there in about half an hour. It’s now almost 6:15! WE NEED TO STOP THE NOISE!!!!!
    Bob gets to his desk and starts searching his files. Who did he put in charge of the new branches construction? Oh yeah! It was Jim.
    Bob has to call Jim. Jim is in the shower getting ready for work (it’s at least 6:30) so Bob leaves a voicemail asking Jim to call him right away! Jim gets out of the shower, notices he’s got a voicemail (he thought he heard his cell phone ring…. Something must be very wrong!). Jim tells Bob that the phone number is in the file, but he gave it to his secretary Nancy to file. Bob asks Jim to call Nancy to find out where the file is and decides to go check her desk. It’s almost 7 when he gets a call from Nancy. She filed it on the third floor. Bob goes to the thrid floor and gets the file. It’s 7:10. He gets the number and calls the contractor, who, because of all the noise, doesn’t hear the phone ring. When the noise stops for a moment a few minutes later, he checks his voicemail and calls Bob back – claiming to have arrived just before 7 and saying he didn’t start work until 7. Knowing that the contractor has worked with the bank fon several projects, he thanks him then calls you back to tell you that according to the contractor, they didn’t even get there until 7. Nothing got done. Nothing was changed. And because Jeff didn’t call the corporate office to complain, you never hear about it so you think that you just got crank called.
    That’s more realistic than a magic CEO with the power to contact a contractor at a bank location being built nowhere near where he lives and stopping the noise immediately scenario you cooked up.
    And I’m not mad at you because you don’t agree with me – I’m not even mad at you.
    I find this ‘discussion’ to be insane and rooted firmly in the imagination of a 24 year old with either no, or very very little, experience in the corporate world.
    I get it – you think it is appropriate and reasonable to call someone at 5 am.
    Two wrongs do not make a right.

  51. eldergias says:

    @jeffislouie: “Sure he would. But that’s not apples to apples. He would walk over there, explain that he was the CEO, and they would stop.
    So he (the ceo) would have to DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT. Sort of like Jeff would have to go over there and ask them to stop.”

    Great Jeff should just walk over to the site and explain how he is the CEO of the company they are doing business for. And when they ask for proof for this obvious lie he would magically pull out something to convince them. Perfect!

    The construction company works for the CEO’s bank. Jeff has nothing to do with them making money. Why would they listen to the CEO when he walks over? Because their paychecks depend on his company continuing to pay them on this job. They would lose money if they didn’t. What does Jeff have up his sleeve?

    You know that you just proved my point. Right?

    “So, why am I upset with you?
    Because like many people under 30, you think you know it all. You assume that your way of thinking is correct.”

    I never claimed I think I know it all, and I readily admit that I am capable of making mistakes, as I am human. Anyone who tells you different is a liar, plain and simple. And yes, I do assume my way of thinking is correct. You also assume your way of thinking is correct. Everyone in the world assumes their way of thinking is correct because if they assumed it was incorrect they would change their way of thinking until they found a way of thinking that they believed to be correct. No one holds a belief that they believe to be incorrect because they easily have the option of changing it. If you have a problem with me thinking I am right, then why do you not have a problem with you thinking you are right? Could it be that you think that you are correct in such a view?

    Yes, I was taught that two wrongs don’t make a right but are you really saying that doing something rude is a wrong akin to committing a crime? It is rude to call people at 5am. I AGREE! I have never thought different, but there are degrees of necessity, something it seems you do not quite understand or believe. Is it more necessary to stop a crime or to not be rude? I think stopping crime is more important. If all I had to do to stop a nuclear holocaust was to inconvenience one person it is worth it, but you say two wrongs don’t make a right. Granted that is an extreme example, but it fits. I am not saying making construction noise is anything akin to nukes, but the analogy is apt in that there is order of necessity. There is clear order of priority in that situation, and I believe that there is clear order of priority with calling the CEO at 5am to stop a crime. Now I would agree with you if it were the case that making phone calls at 5am was illegal. However you have one action that is illegal and one that is an inconvenience. I think the crime is more important.

    You know what, you are PROBABLY right about your situation whereby it would take hours for the CEO to do anything about the noise even if he wanted to.
    But for you to say it is the ONLY way is fantasy as well. You would have to say it was IMPOSSIBLE that he had ever met the head of the contractors and gotten his number in his cell phone, or that he had the person’s card, or that the VP of Finance that sets their budget or the COO that coordinates the deals with them also could not possibly have the contractor’s number. If you are honestly saying those situations are literally impossible, then you are living in a fantasy world. You are right, your scenario is more realistic, but that does not make it fact. Mine is not fact either, but I did not have to paint reality, I only have to show the possibility.

    “I find this ‘discussion’ to be insane and rooted firmly in the imagination of a 24 year old with either no, or very very little, experience in the corporate world.”

    Well since you took offense at:

    “JustThisGuy says:
    “your suggestion is mind-bogglingly selfish and, to a certain extent, completely idiotic.”

    Good job, champ.”
    and then:
    “How incredibly selfish and ignorant “

    Wouldn’t that be the pot calling the kettle black? Someone calls your argument “completely idiotic” and you get mad, then you turn around and call someone else’s argument “insane and rooted firmly in the imagination of a 24 year old”. Different wording, same exact meaning. (and yes, I know they called you selfish as well, but if that was the part you took offense at you would have just quoted that part and would not have included both quotes)

    Also, by you saying that, it again directly implies that “You assume that your way of thinking is correct” because my arguments must “be insane”.

    I readily admit I am human and prone to error, however I do not think I am wrong at the moment. If I did, then I would change my opinion. I have changed my opinion in the past, given sufficient evidence. Can you say the same of this entire paragraph for yourself?

    “I get it – you think it is appropriate and reasonable to call someone at 5 am.”

    Clearly you don’t get it. I don’t think it is appropriate to call someone at 5am. But it is EVEN LESS appropriate to allow criminal activities to continue. Do you really think it is better to let crimes go on then bother someone in a legal manner who could possibly do something about it?

    “Two wrongs do not make a right.”

    No, but letting one wrong continue doesn’t make a right either. And if the second wrong is not as bad as the first, and would make the first stop, then it should be done.

    At this point it really seems like you must be the CEO, despite what you say about being from Chicago. It is fairly clear you are angry, despite saying that you are not (even though you said “So, why am I upset with you?” yes, angry and upset are different, but unless you are the CEO why do you have any emotional investment in the argument?) Throwing insults at me and my intelligence when I had done nothing against you, angry.

    And as for your “catchy one liners” haven’t you even heard that “even the oldest man can learn from the youngest child”? Way to discount people based on age, very open minded of you.

    As for replying to this post: don’t. I am tired of your unwarranted insults and your illogical rejection of opposing views rather than actually pleasantly continuing to debating them. If you didn’t want to continue the debate further, you could have simply said, “Well, it seems we have different opinions and lets leave it at that” without injecting insults into your response. Learn how to be courteous in a debate then come back, till then we don’t need your hate-mongering around here.

    Well, it seems we have different opinions and lets leave it at that.

  52. jeffislouie says:

    Hate mongering?
    Grow up.
    That is the most ridiculous nonsense you’ve put down so far…
    Learn how to have a debate?
    You mean by staying on topic?
    And it is Jeff’s civic duty to call the CEO to stop a crime?
    Please.
    It’s a noise violation, not a rape or murder.
    And the CEO, as we both seem to agree, likely couldn’t have stopped it immediately.
    My ‘insults’ are unwarranted?
    Like when I pointed out that Jeff could walk over and ask them to stop?
    Or that he call the company during business hours to complain?
    Maybe what got under your skin was the fact that I still think that calling a CEO at 5 am over this is unreasonable.
    I don’t know.
    But hey, let’s try to steer away from paranoia (‘it seems like you must be the CEO’). Well, you caught me. What can I say. As the CEO of a multi-billion dollar bank in New York, I like to spend my time debating with 24 year old who can’t understand that the article was pointing out that it was wrong to use to police to try to intimidate someone who called ME at 5 am.
    No, you are right. Let’s debate the details ad nauseaum, irrespective of the facts or the reality of the situation.
    It’s fun, and productive.
    “I readily admit I am human and prone to error, however I do not think I am wrong at the moment. If I did, then I would change my opinion. I have changed my opinion in the past, given sufficient evidence. Can you say the same of this entire paragraph for yourself?”
    Yes. But so far, your argument is that the CEO can do something about it. We agree. You think he can do something at 5 am. I think he can’t do anything until business hours and when he is working.
    “I don’t think it is appropriate to call someone at 5am.”
    So you finally admit that. Good for you! I’m proud of you.
    “And as for your “catchy one liners” haven’t you even heard that “even the oldest man can learn from the youngest child”?”
    You mean ‘two wrongs don’t make a right” isn’t good enough?
    “Wouldn’t that be the pot calling the kettle black? Someone calls your argument “completely idiotic” and you get mad, then you turn around and call someone else’s argument “insane and rooted firmly in the imagination of a 24 year old”. Different wording, same exact meaning. “
    So you admit that it is rooted in your imagination and you have little or no corporate experience?
    The discussion is insane because it doesn’t matter and we are arguing about the minutia. The rest is a fact. If you had experience in a large company, you would understand that the larger a company becomes, the slower it is to react.
    hence, a 5 am call likely wouldn’t result in anything but what it resulted in – a pissed off CEO (at the guy who called, not the contractor) and a citizen who accomplished nothing.
    “Is it more necessary to stop a crime or to not be rude? I think stopping crime is more important. “
    Cops stop crimes.
    CEO’s make high level decisions and plan long term direction. Your argument is a fallacy.
    “Great Jeff should just walk over to the site and explain how he is the CEO of the company they are doing business for. And when they ask for proof for this obvious lie he would magically pull out something to convince them. Perfect!”

    That’s a fallcy too – it’s called a strawman argument.
    Jeff should have walked over and said he is a resident and that construction is not allowed before 7 am. Then, he should ask them to stop.
    That has a much better chance of stopping the noise (immediately too) than calling a CEO at 5 am.
    “You know what, you are PROBABLY right about your situation whereby it would take hours for the CEO to do anything about the noise even if he wanted to.”
    Again, you agree with me.
    So – why keep arguing?
    Oh. You want to win.
    Got it.
    So here you go – you win.
    And I don’t think it should be limited to noise violations at 5 am.
    I think anytime any company does you wrong in any way, you should call the CEO at home – no matter what time it is – to complain.
    That’ll teach them for working for a company to provide a service or good!
    “Well, it seems we have different opinions and lets leave it at that.”
    By my count, I said that, what – 4 or 5 times already?
    And you keep coming back here to argue with me, all the while trotting out fallacies and unrealistic arguments.
    Why are YOU so mad?
    Love,
    The CEO of some bank in New York.

  53. employee says:

    This is my first post. Lipkin is a complete self-absorbed idiot. He doesn’t care about his employees. I work for a company that Valley Bank acquired. We haven’t had a decent raise in 5 years and he gets a multi million dollar raise every year!!! I couldn’t tell you the last time we got a bonus. He has to approve everything!!! It is the little people in his company that are making him rich. The guy called 311 and the cops and got no where. What he did was great and most of us wish we had balls enough to do what he did. He stood up for his community and should be applauded for it. Lipkin broke his own code of conduct in the Valley handbook and should be fired by his OWN GUIDELINES!!!

  54. FinanceGuru says:

    @jeffislouie

    The irony of your blathering on about courtesy and manners when you yourself display exactly the opposite is apparently beyond you.

  55. SkaldGrimnir says:

    @ quite a few of you…

    Not sure, but in some cities, if you call 911 for a 311 issue, they will fine you. If you call 311, however, and are transferred to 911, it is a different story.

    Also, some cities I have lived in say 311 is a “dispatch during normal business hours” type of line. Other cities, it is 24 dispatch.

    And a couple small cities I lived in did not have a 311.

    So, it all depends on the local area.

    As for calling the CEO, I refuse to comment on the right or wrong of the issue. But I can say, from speaking with my own companies CEO, he has the power to get stuff done. He has at least a few numbers at home. I’ve seen some of the managing partners called at 3 am, just to have them start calling other people.

    Because a crisis can erupt at any time, they, and the CEO, tend to have the numbers of people who can get things done, no matter the hour.

    Whether or not they want to do it is another matter.

  56. jedsa says:

    In the end, it does not matter whether or not the call to the CEO should have made. The real issue, in my eyes at least, is that the bank CEO somehow got the NYPD to investigate what was not a crime. That is misappropriation of police resources. If the NYPD knew that it was not a crime when they began investigating, and if the bank was truthful, they should have, the police may be guilty of harassment and intimidation. If the bank was not truthful, they should be charged with giving false information to the police, obstruction of justice, or something along those lines.

    It is absolutely unacceptable for the NYPD to acting as a private security force for a private company. Sadly, it seems to be well in character for them. (Making it their mission to suppress the message of legitimate protestors is just one of many such examples).

  57. 5h17h34d says:

    @lamorevincera: Invading privacy to call at 5am? Not by a longshot. I turn my phones off when I sleep. Not hard to do.

  58. jeffislouie says:

    @FinanceGuru:
    “The irony of your blathering on about courtesy and manners when you yourself display exactly the opposite is apparently beyond you.”

    I guess. But seeing as I calmly and politely tried to explain myself before being baited into a fight (remember when YOU asked me what planet I was from?), I think my response, while over the top, still displayed some restraint.

    Fortunately, this will be my last post on the subject.
    Admittedly, I lost my cool.
    But can you REALLY blame me?
    I know, it’s hip and cool (especially around here) to be anti-corporation. I get it. Really.
    But the reality is that there is only one aspect to this story that seems to deviate from the norm – the head of security for the company called the cops and used his ties to harrass Jeff.
    Other than that, the situation bore itself out exactly as I would have predicted.
    A phone call to the CEO resulted in no change, no resolution, and nothing getting fixed.
    What boggles my mind is how people still seem to believe, regardless of the evidence presented, that calling the CEO at 5 am was a good idea.
    So my point is this, and then I’m done:
    When determining which way to attempt to accomplish something, one can either do what ‘feels good’ or they can choose to do something that has a likelihood of acheiving their goal.
    In this case, calling the CEO ‘felt good’, but got nothing done.
    So please, feel free to continue to chide me for coming up with reasonable ways to resolve this issue.
    Clearly, the 5 am call worked. Right?
    Oh. Wait. Not so much.

    Moving along – to those of you who think a 911 call is unwarranted and can get you fined over something like this….
    I walked up to a cop eating dinner at a burger joint I was picking up dinner at and asked him. I gave him the exact scenario as described in the article. Know what he said?
    Call 911, tell them where the noise violation is occuring. They can go over there and tell the construction crew to stop. They then would call the building department and file a complaint. The building department can then go down to the site during normal business hours and deliver a citation. That’s what he said. But hey, 5 am calls to the CEO make you FEEL better….
    And there was a car parked in my alley this week. It showed up Wednesday morning and was there when I got home on Friday night. (I have a double wide alley).
    I called 911. Three times. I didn’t get fined. And they towed the car.

  59. FinanceGuru says:

    @ jeffislouis:

    Rationalization is a pretty “feel good” response too, isn’t it? Just sayin’.

    You called somebody else on a purported strawman argument, so how about copping to using unsupported anecdotal evidence (i.e., asking a cop at a restaurant)?

    As long as anecdotal evidence works, I’ll relate that I’ve made a call to a CEO in a somewhat similar situation, and it was resolved (i.e., they cut out the noise.)

    I’m not anti-corporation. (Frankly, some of my most important clients are corporations.) I’m a results-oriented person. Since I’ve done this before — and achieved the desired result — it sounds pretty damn reasonable to me.