The Consumerist ACSI Fund v2.0

Based on your suggestions, we redid The Consumerist ACSI fund mock portfolio. We changed it from 100 shares to $1000 worth of each company, rounded down to whole shares. This way the highest stocks won’t have an undue influence on the portfolio’s performance.

We also made the The Consumerist ANTI-ASCI fund, buying only companies performing in the bottom 20% on the ACSI relative to their competition and having ACSI scores below the national average.

Peek at our portfolios…


acsifund2.jpg

antiacsi.jpg

We know, ha ha, the ANTI-ACSI is outperforming the ACSI. Even if it was the other way around, you can’t tell anything from a mere 2 hours and 20 minutes of the market being open…

In that spirit, Correlation does not equal causation. To truly see the experiment’s hypothesis out, it will need to run for far longer than any of us will probably be writing this blog. Something like 10 years, ya know?

Even still, we’ll have fun tracking the funds’ progress, and seeing if it might be true that company’s with higher scores on the American Customer Satisfaction Index outperform the market indexes. — BEN POPKEN

NOTES:
* Made these charts with Google Finance’s portfolio function.
* It’s easier to find companies below the national ACSI average than above it.
* Samsung was excluded as they’re not public ally traded on the American stock market.

PREVIOUSLY: The Consumerist ACSI Fund

(Photo: Getty Images)

Comments

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  1. mantari says:

    To truly see the experiment’s hypothesis out, it will need to run for far longer than any of us will probably be writing this blog. Something like 10 years, ya know?

    What? I thought you guys were in it for the long haul! Are we but a stepping stone in your illustrious career? A footnote in the world of Gawker Media?

  2. Anonymously says:

    Can you somehow put these in the sidebar for quick, real-time comparison?

  3. thrillhouse says:

    not sure what Amazon is trying to say here, but for this post, their ad recommend two books:
    “Investing in REITS” by Ralph L Block
    “Whore” by Tanika Lynch

    Money better invested elsewhere?

  4. Nathanaver says:

    Where is HPQ? I think they had the best improvement in the computer area.

  5. cdan says:

    suggestion for v3.0:

    the top 20 asci is backward looking – it shows the companies that have already improved (and likely outperformed due to stonger sales b/c of better customer service). also, these companies have no where to go but down!

    a better indicator of future performance might be the 20 companies showing the greatest improvement in the ASCI

  6. cdan says:

    * i recognize that the above portfolio would also be backward looking, however, it might be a better indication of further ASCI improvement

  7. mac-phisto says:

    what is the sop for replacing picks as the ASCI top 20% changes?

  8. Ben Popken says:

    @mac-phisto: If a company falls out of the top 20% and/or its ACSI falls below the national ACSI average, we sell it.

  9. I agree with the sidebar suggestion. And this little project is awesome guys.

    cdan might be right about using companies with the greatest improvement. We might see more of a profit overall.