We're Always Looking For Porn On Customer's Computers, Techies Confirm

Looking through comments both here and on Digg, it seems that finding and saving customer’s porn from their laptops is one of the perks of the job, and it’s hardly limited to the Geek Squad.

Sometimes they just look at the porn and laugh. Sometimes they save it on a big communal computer. Sometimes they report people to the police if they find child porn.

Just remember that when you bring your computer in for repairs, you’re basically handing over your entire life to a stranger. If you save “naughty” content on your computer, you might want to consider saving it to an external hard drive, or learn how to repair your own computer.

10 such comments, inside…

(Photo: Adrian Wallet)


Consumerist commenters:

XianZhuXuande writes:
I have known Geeksquad employees who have accumulated pornography and music collections from customer computers, for example, and everyone has that story of the nudie pics they’ve seen of customers themselves, but people who would go this far in violating customer privacy are rare indeed.

filmmakker writes:
As far as searching for people’s porn, music, photos, etc…OK, that totally happened all the time, but in almost every case, it was when we were being paid to do a data back-up anyway.

Digg users:

alphabet:
my friend works at geek squad. He told me of a story where a hot girl and her father walked in to get their computer fixed. The agents found the pics of her and her boyfriend having sex and saved it. When she came back later with her dad, one of the agents said “Alright, we backed up everything for you for,” and then he glanced at the girl and said “everything…” At that point, the girl got bright red in the face and just wanted to get out of there.

nerfdude:
back around 2001, a friend of mine worked for Best Buy. this was before they had Geek Squad handling all their technology-related installs, upgrades, and repairs. he took me into the back room where they did all of their customer PC work, and they had a common computer with a half dozen USB hard drives attached to it, filled to the brim with porn, movies, and mp3’s. whenever ANYBODY dropped off a computer, they’d do whatever was needed on it, then they’d hunt down all of its media and copy it over. every employee in the store knew about it, and nobody cared.

anotherthought:
local small pc repair stores does it too, my bro used to work for one, he was told to open up computers ($35) and look inside even if my bro knew it was a software problem which might be something as simple as and update.

o and yes, he hunted for stuf

usrlocalbin:
heh…This was the highlight of our day at CompUSA back in those days.

The best time was when a dude from MTV’s Real World brought his laptop in for service.
This was back in 2000 or around there, I can’t remember the dude’s name but he was the one token black guy on the show at the time. My boss worked on his computer and found some videos.
I’ll just say that this dude liked his porn with a little human feces…..
*shudder*

cpuenvy:
Most repair shops do the Compulsory Porn Scan.

It’s a requirement on my bench, and my sluts folder is over 2GB :)

I have turned in 3 pedophiles and extorted another, also.

ma5t3r_chi3f:
I think all techs will look for porn/movies/music on a computer if there is enough time and the owner is hot. I remember when I used to work for BBY we would do it just to mess around. Whoever wrote the article sounds like they came from a super shiesty store. We all know stores like that exist, but not all BBYs are that shiesty. Our store wasn’t that bad, but then again, I did leave over a year ago. We definitely would look for media though. Lots of porn & lots of music.

aidsbunny:
Not really surprising. Having worked in the large batch film developing industry I have a rather nice collection of self-pics and amateur porn. No, not going to share for obvious legal reasons.

bitterbug:
I did Y2K contracting at the Ontario Ministry of Health, and while backing up a directors machine I found videos of bestiality and teenage girls pissing, so I passed the info on to my superiors. I was pissed that my tax dollars were being spent on some asshole downloading porn in his office.

Nothing was done apparently, as I google his name occasionally and it appears he still works there. I remember the name because it happened to be the same as one of the founding members of Ministry. And no, not Al.

— BEN POPKEN

Comments

Edit Your Comment

  1. NeoteriX says:

    http://www.truecrypt.org/

    Seriously guys. Porn aside, you’ve got really critical data on your computer. I hope you wouldn’t leave the house and the door unlocked when the plumber comes to unclog your toilet.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TrueCrypt
    (It’s free, it’s bulletproof, it’s Open Source.)

  2. cde says:

    Hell, when I repair computers as a side job, if I think there might be some good pics, I just copy every image file over to an external and go through them later. Music, I browse and copy what sounds interesting.

  3. shdwsclan says:

    @Neoterix

    You do NOT need any REDUNDANT encryption since most computer illeterate idiot dont understand that adding that kind of encryption will disallow anyone to repair the computer software portion the computer and further complicate backup.

    Also, most backups are shit if they are not done with acronis.

    Windows has builtin encryption, just make sure you actually put a password and dont use root from day to day. Make an account for yourself with lower privaledges. You can select specific folders to encrypt that will only be accessible from windows and only from the owner’s account.

    This is also true in any *nix.

    If you need general encryption, every operating system has it built in. It will not complicate backups since there is no additional data in the boot sector.

  4. ShadowFalls says:

    I will bring this up again. Any tech who does such behavior tends to be completely unprofessional. When it all comes down to it, you should be able to trust that a tech considers your privacy important. From the comments I see, this is obviously not true of many.

    Most of the users are not familiar with their computers at all, or even know when they make an account on their computer for the first time that there is a non-passworded Administrator account that can be accessed with ease. People like to take advantage of their ignorance instead of trying to educate them.

    To again point out, there is no reason you should ever need to open any of their files unless the client asks explicitly to do so. You don’t need to know what files are to back them up, any excuses in this manner are just silly.

    Just find a tech you can trust, I have never once done anything like this. Don’t try and loop everyone in together because of a group of unprofessional techs, sure things like child porn are bad but it is not your job to look for it. Just think about this, how many mechanics go through your car looking for illegal substances? Could you even trust one that did such? I see this as the same. So anyone here or elsewhere who thinks this is ok, get some self respect and do your job with distinction, computer repair work isn’t a file shopping spree.

    In conclusion, it is a sad sight to see so many that say they do it. This not only is appalling at the lack of care for a client’s data, but is just bad service all around. You are wasting time with all this garbage, this is time they could be using their computer again. To me, getting their computer back to them as fast as possible with great service and reliable workmanship is what it is all about, not some sick porn hunt or a music download service.

  5. Anonymously says:

    I would never consider doing this. My most embarrassing experience is when I accidentally ran across a program called “cycle watch” in the add/remove programs and questioned the client about it. Imagine my surprise when it had nothing to do with bicycles.

  6. Falconfire says:

    @ShadowFalls: Even some very professional techs do it. What it more speaks volumes of is that so many people dont really think before they send their computers in.

    They have no problem hiding their porn mags in their house from prying eyes, but there is a link to their photos RIGHT ON THE DAMN DESKTOP.

    Me personally I dont look for it on computers I do outside of work, and if I find it on work computers, I report it ASAP since I work in a school district. More than one janitor has been fired because I found what they where REALLY doing on the job.

  7. Hawkins says:

    NeoteriX beat me to it, but it’s worth repeating: everybody should have a TrueCrypt volume on their machine, and store their data there as a matter of policy.

    The file that holds the volume can be made effectively invisible, by giving it a name like Grandma’sBirthdayParty.avi.

    If you’ve got something particularly secret, it’s straightforward to create a hidden TrueCrypt volume within an existing TrueCrypt volume. If your password is compromised, your attacker gets your confidential PowerPoint presentations, but not the tentacle porn. Or vice versa, depanding on how you’re wired.

    And it’s REALLY EASY. Plus it’s FREE. Go on, check it out: http://www.truecrypt.org/ .

  8. zibby says:

    Ugh. Like there’s not enough pr0n out there for the taking – this is like sitting in a chair by your window with binoculars.

  9. dwarf74 says:

    @shdwsclan: Where are you getting your info, man? XP doesn’t actually encrypt files stored in a ‘private’ directory. What it does, is limit access to those areas through the OS.

    If you were to boot with a Linux Live CD or something of that nature, you can get to those “private” directories right away. Alternately, if you login to the not-very-hidden Administrator account in safe mode, you can change folder permissions as needed to access those files.

    This has saved my butt more than once, when I needed to do an OS reinstall. It’s very, very helpful. However, if it’s all you’re doing to keep your pictures of you & the missus safe from the prying eyes of the evil tech, you might as well not have even bothered.

    Also, having a TrueCrypt “partition” for your sensitive data will absolutely not inhibit anyone from making backups. Seriously, it’s just a file and backs up or restores just as easily as any other file.

  10. willywonka78 says:

    Hw do you recommend getting rid of such eh personal files?

  11. I don’t look for it, but If i’m digging thru things trying to back up data, yes, I will look. I’ve seen some nice amateur photos.

  12. mindshadow says:

    I work as a tech for a large real estate company. I’ve done a lot of freelance work, and I see a lot of people’s personal machines at work (real estate agents bring their personal PCs in). I’ve never really gone around looking for porn, but sometimes you do stumble upon it (e.g. if they’re asking for a backup of their data). Let’s not forget that sometimes Windows turns thumbnails on in directories with photos and movies. One time I found some rather interesting content on the CFO’s laptop (his work laptop, not his personal laptop). I didn’t report it because it’s a cool guy.

    Point being even if you aren’t looking sometimes you can stumble upon it. Though I will say that even if the customer will never know you found their naked pictures, the point that you’re looking for them will show through in your personal integrety. Sometimes knowing how honest you are and how much you respect your client’s personal life is as good as the client knowing. Like the guy above me said, I’d never take my car to a mechanic if I knew he was going to be looking for my ganja. :)

  13. Plaid Rabbit says:

    @Moonshine Mike: Exactly what happened to me. Except, I do mostly work for my fellow law students on their computers. I never explicitly looking for anything, but when I’m doing data recovery on a shaky hard drive, sometimes they’re just not hidden. I found quite a stash on a computer one time. Wouldn’t have been surprising, except it happened to be a women.

    [shrug]

  14. PBH says:

    Nothing says class like extorting money from a pedophile.

  15. clarient says:

    Wow.

    We poke around where I work and laugh at some of the amusing sites our customers vistit (I’ve seen some strange ones) but copying over amatuer videos and photos? Seriously, where has your integrity gone?

    I don’t find anything wrong with copying mp3’s, and I can tolerate somebody taking downloaded porn (i.e. stuff that’s already available on the internet – even though really, how much porn does one person need?) but actually taking something that personally belongs to the user is completely and totally obscene. These people don’t KNOW any better, and they’re taking their system to you in the hopes that you will magically fix everything.

    It doesn’t give you free reign to take complete advantage over them in every way possible!

    Sometimes my fellow techies make me sick.

  16. cde says:

    Well, considering some are only taking the pics for themselves, not to upload, its not that bad. We are not blackmailing them. Hell, we arn’t even deleting the files from their hd in the first place. We could be taking personal and financial data instead.

    And as for child porn part of it, I am normally not one to agree when cops or others do it for things like drugs, but if it’s considered “unprofessional” yet I get one of those fuckers caught, I’ll be damn unprofessional. I’ll even collect my fee before the cops get to him.

  17. It’s the equivalent of looking through somebody’s medicine cabinet at a party.

    You can try to justify it any way you like, but it’s still creepy and rude.

  18. MariSama44 says:

    @cde: It doesnt matter if you dont upload the pics or distribute them, the pictures are still the property of the comuter’s owner. Taking their property without asking is loathesome. Private pictures are not meant to be shared, and it seems like any tech with half a brain would understand that. It makes me sick that most of you have no respect for other people’s privacy. It makes me even sicker that you all think you need to have that much porn at your fingertips. Get a girlfriend — and a spine.

  19. pestie says:

    The only nudie pics that exist of me are a handful of pictures I sent to my girlfriend at her request a couple years ago. She had a major PC crash at one point and had to take it to a repair shop to have her data recovered (I’d have done it, but I live 1000+ miles and one international border away from her). So now I figure these guys have probably seen pictures of me they dearly wish they’d never seen. I feel sorry for them. Heh…

  20. FishingCrue says:

    If you want to hide your porn, just change the extension (and also the name as HornyManateePorn.txt might give it away). Then you pretty much never have to worry about prying techs. In the alternative you could try backing up your amateur porn to CD/DVD and hiding it next to your collection of playboys. I don’t think anyone really has a reasonable expectation of privacy when they surrender their computer to an undersexed nerd.

  21. Framling says:

    My dad’s been doing this kind of work for years and he always makes it a point to never look at any of the customer’s files, just to limit his own liability regarding child porn.

  22. royal72 says:

    “As far as searching for people’s porn, music, photos, etc…OK, that totally happened all the time, but in almost every case, it was when we were being paid to do a data back-up anyway.”

    so then you won’t mind if i come over and search through your computer for interesting stuff to copy… what, you do mind? wtf, you did invite me in and told me to make myself at home, so it’s ok.

  23. ShadowFalls says:

    @Falconfire:

    Stating that they do it clearly means they are not “very professional” or perhaps your definition of “professional” is different from mine.

    @cde:

    The whole point is, you shouldn’t be looking for it to begin with, I mean it isn’t out of the realm of possibility you might see they have child porn, such as an idiot having it as their wallpaper or XP’s thumbnails. But, to actively look for it is just sad. Sure you should report that if you were to see it by accident, but don’t forget, if you as a tech call it in, the police could take your computers from you as possible evidence.

    How would you feel if someone went through all your files? They copied everything, even things you didn’t know were on there that could be humiliating to you. Just to be straight, cde, your behavior is just quite simply, pitiful. You should stop trying to justify your actions with saying things like, “Well, I could take this or that, but I don’t.” Whatever helps you sleep at night I suppose.

  24. JustThisGuy says:

    and this is news to some folks? i always thought this was common knowledge. kind of like how you shouldn’t get risque photos developed by a third party.

  25. wezelboy says:

    Any tech/sysadmin that finds kiddy porn on someone’s hard drive is REQUIRED BY LAW to report it to authorities.

  26. dr_netboy says:

    being the neighborhood computer nerd is much like being the physician next door. you have a responsibility to not share any information that you come across while fixing a pc. I have fixed many a computer through people referred from my wife who works in a ‘social networking’ rich industry, and even came across some questionable material on the pc’s while fixing them. I wouldnt even mention to my wife or make a copy of things such as the fact that there was a folder of same sex pornography on one of the pc’s brought from a member of her industry… it’s like doctor-patient confidentiality… you get paid a premium wage to do these menial tasks, and it deserves the self discipline to apply ethical morals to your actions when dealing with these customers

  27. aboveitall says:

    This is Geek Squad for goodness sake! Not exactly the “Navy Seals” of computer repair. What else did you expect?

  28. Neritha says:

    Hello. I am a current Geek Squad Agent. I go to a local university, and while I’m qualified enough to do a more technical job, Geek Squad allows me to have flexible hours.

    Allow in your space, my perspective.

    I agree with the writer in Best Buy is not a bad or good company, rather it is an Electronics store with a side business in computers. There are the following managers at my store: A store manager, an operations manager, two front-end managers, a services manager, a sales manager, an operations manager and an inventory manager. Of the eight, one is proficient enough to know what Windows ME is. The rest of them simply make managerial decisions based on the suggestion of whoever called them over. So if my services manager (the one who’s relatively proficient) is not scheduled, I don’t have a manager who has any clue how to handle Geek Squad situations.

    Having worked at two different precincts, understand the following: there is no greater treasure trove of illegal software and music then the techpc in the Geeksquad. Our tech desktop has everything from limewired games to porn to enough mp3s to make an RIAA lawyer jump in glee. The safeguard against it is a contract that says that the company will not protect us if we’re the client in a potential lawsuit and a notice in “Action Center” on a monthly basis to clean the techpc. It’s never done and nobody cares. And why should we? We obtained stolen merchandise through an illegal method. And assuming somebody were smart enough to look at our techpc, who would you pin it on? There’s been maybe fourty agents through our precinct since December, and there’s absolutely no chance one of us wouldn’t pin it on an already long-dead agent.

    And the way we get most of the material is perfectly viable to policy and makes perfect sense. Our backup policy is to back the unit up directly to DVD without copying it onto permanent media, UNLESS we need to keep a copy for some reason (financial) or the Hard Drive has a problem. A lot of times, we use a simple program called ROBOCOPY to XCopy a buyer’s Hard Drive onto our TechPC – unlike Nero (our paid software), Robocopy will retry if a HDD has a short mechanical error. So copy the whole HDD onto ours, and do the backup from that. Then the files stay on our computer, for days, weeks, or even months.

    And the agents. I am blessed that we have at least, out of our twelve agents, a few competant ones. Our manager (the DCI) knows his stuff, and I know my stuff and a couple others. But at least eight of us have marginal technical skills at best. I’m the only agent who’s proficient at Unix, and the only one that’s proficient at Mac OS and I’m no there that often. I recommended to a senior manager that agents become proficient at Ubuntu 4.07 (Feisty Fawn), because Wal-Mart will be selling PCs with it very soon. You’d have thought I had suggested that we teach Agents how to speak in Korean.

    But it really doesn’t matter that the agents don’t have any idea what they’re talking about. They won’t be fixing your computer anyway. Agent John, Agent Steve, Agent Shawn, Agent Carol fixing your PC is a delusion. I, for one, only toil in PCs if we’re overloaded, on really difficult units, or sometimes I’ll just openly decide not to sell and fix a pc just to make my life more manageable. Your PC will be fixed with people like Agent Sumir, Agent Pashawandi, and Agent Rashid. I chat with them all the time. The nastiest secret about Geek Squad is who is the real face of Geek Squad. The real face of Geek Squad is Jonny Utah, a Remote Access Service provided by a network accessible KVM switch. If the computer can post and connect to the internet – it goes on. The same indian techs that Dell had to get rid of due to customer ire are now openly repairing PCs. Add to that the Geek Squad’s allowed tools CD, the MRI, which contains an automated Virus and Spyware software loader (but only for the companies that paid extra – there’s no Symantec or Kaperssky on that CD) and an automated spyware scanner, and there’s little more then clicking a mouse to the average GS agent. And if all else fails, Rule 10!

    I would guess that redos and returns of GS services have tripled in the last year.

    But fear not, ye of the serious computer problem. Remember where I said that I only toil in PCs on really difficult units? That is because I am also a Geek Squad secret – the “Black Ops” agent. I signed my document stating I would only use tools on the MRI, but that is a fallacy as well. I am expected to get the computer repaired no matter what, even though I fully expect that if it came down to me or them, a manager would fully perjure himself and throw me under the bus to save the mothership. Linux Hacks, Symantec virus removers, Bart’s PE, illegal virus removers, you name it. What goes on in the back corner of your GS, stays there. I turn the monitor off and nobody turns it on but me, and nobody watches what I do. This is simply because they have turned the precincts into a competition against each other and against the service center. If I send a unit to service, the service center gets all the money. My revenue goes down, so our precinct loses hours, so our hours get cut. It is in my best interest to make sure the computers work. I take the risk of litgation in order to make myself indispensible. And the services manager high-fives me for it.

    Plus, Geek Squad is quickly becoming a vertical monopoly. We’ve undercut our own manufacturers at the labor cost of PC repairs, so they all use us for their out of warrantly repairs. As a bonus, since we’re the largest repair facility in the US (at Geek Squad City), we get a bulk discount on refurbished parts!

    What does this mean? When you buy the Best Buy PSP – you aren’t buying a warranty from Best Buy. You’re buying one from AIG, an incredibly large insurance company. They make their money by spending as little as possible. Refurbished parts and cheap labor make doing extensive repairs more cost-efficient then replacing the unit, even if we know the unit will break again almost immediately. And even with thousands of agents at GSC, they’re swamped. Units come back unfixed, fixed improperly, broken worse, or missing parts. I’ve already seen three PCs fall into the Bermuda Triangle, never to return. I think GSC has about a 90% successful repair rate. Think about that. One in ten units sent to service (over half the computers we fix) come back defective. And please do not be shielded by the No Lemon policy. It is absolutely nothing but holes.

    The average agent doesn’t follow policy because there’s no incentive to do so. We can’t call in sick, because there’s nobody to replace us but other agents, and we’re woefully short staffed. I’m paid approximately a dollar more then a blue shirt, and do four times as much (mostly in answering questions) and I have to wear the uniform. Since I’m a “geek”, obviously I know everything about everything, so I’m expected to sell computers when they’re overrun, home theatre when they’re overrun, or Car-Fi, even though I know absolutely nothing about car stereos, couldn’t sell them if I tried, and it took me six hours to get my receiver to work. Geek Squad bills at 60 per hour of raw work, and of that, I get one-sixth. I have no benefits, even though our leading competitor offers their part-time firedogs insurance. I work every holiday but Thanksgiving and Christmas, and trust me Geek Squad is an absolutely hopping place on Father’s Day or Labor Day, or Columbus Day. We work more hours then most blueshirts – there’s often a agent in at 7 am, and we leave often two hours after close. Since there’s far less GS agents, it’s nearly impossible for us to get uniform replacements, so I just end up buying my own uniforms- which caused a manager to yell at me because instead of the correct shirt, I bought a pinpoint collar with the buttons. I once got written up for not calling in sick, coming in, and telling a customer that I had to come in sick as an explanation for sneezing all over her unit. And you wonder why I personally don’t feel guilty about lifting a copy of a song that a customer stole off Limewire? (For the record – I have never taken anything from a customer that wasn’t music or a book on MP3 – even though that’s inethical as well.)

    One of our full-time agents barely knows anything about computers. Our double-agent (in home specialist) used to be our computer manager, and he knows computers, but he got the job because he’s a more proficient salesperson. Our computer manager used to install stereos. He knows nothing about PCs. I know of at least two people who came to Best Buy from other retails stores, and don’t know anything about computers, but know how to sell stuff. I spend more time fixing mistakes then fixing computers. I spent more time today talking to India then I did talking to any single customer. There are maybe fifteen units being worked on at my precinct right now, and maybe three of them have an agent who knows exactly what’s going on with them in the store.

    Geek Squad: Hero Support.

  29. Neritha says:

    Please, if you really want to keep it on your PC and in Geeksquad, just put it in a password protected ZIP or RAR file. It’s easy, and trust me, unless you are amazingly hot or incredibly profitable (in which case, we’ll just hack your Blackberry…), no agent is going to brute force a ZIP file to steal porn, especially when we’re AWASH in professional porn. It’s literally what we do for a living. I’d guess that 65-75% of the computers that come in for an Advanced Diagnostic and Repair (virus and spyware removal) got it from downloading porn from Ares or Limewire or Kazaa.

    Your porn is not special. If you marginally protect it, nobody’s going to bother to take it.

  30. dc0de says:

    As Cpl. Dwayne Hicks said, “I say we take off and nuke the entire site from orbit. It’s the only way to be sure.”

    When I have problems with my computers, they first get a dose of Darik’s Boot and Nuke (http://dban.sourceforge.net/), a fresh install, and a fresh set of security signatures.

    It may be time consuming, but I don’t let my systems out of my site without wiping them. And if you think you can ‘un-wipe’ a drive cleaned with dban, I’ll be happy to take your drive, wipe it, and you can try…

    File encryption is freely available, (truecrypt [www.truecrypt.org] and those of us with information to keep safe, know how to use them. Not that I’m hiding child porn, or pics of myself (*shudder*), but my financials, and other files that are personal, are kept encrypted, from the on disk storage, and in the backup media.

    These are the things that everyone needs to know, so share it with everyone you know…

  31. altgrave says:

    @DR_NETBOY

    unfortunately, there seems to be no equivalent to a tech hippocratic oath – not that an oath stops doctors from doing harm…

  32. Trackback says:

    Tech support services like the Geek Squad are notorious for violating the privacy of their customers, and now they’ve been caught in the act. Consumer affairs blog Consumerist rigged up a PC to record itself, and then sent it to the Geek Squad with a request for iTunes to be installed.

  33. zenithomega says:

    To some of the techs who left comments stating it is no big deal to peek and pry and copy and paste, I just want to ask: Because I work in a bank, do you mind if I share your financial worth with whoever I deem acceptable to share it with? I mean, I see your bank statement all day long-it is really no big deal. Except that it is. Most positions in the job sector require that you respect the customer and their privacy. A customer’s information is not a pandora box for you to rifle through with as you please. You should be ashamed of yourself.

  34. Anonymous says:

    Lets be honest with ourselves, we know it happens, we know it is unprofessional, and we know it is an invasion of privacy. That being said we ALSO know that when we go to these places we sign a release form saying that YES you can do what you want to my computer, YES i know that i know have 0 control on reperations if you break it.

    I used to work for CC as a tech and this kind of thing did go on. However, that release form is there for a reason. Make sure you dont save that stuff to your machine if you do not want it to be seen. Even if you delete it, it is still there, so protect yourself and save it elsewhere.

    Salute

  35. Anonymous says:

    At the repair shop I work at, we have an unspoken rule: Actively rifling through a machine for porn will get you a look and a “get back to work” from the manager. Stumbling upon it on accident is fine. If you find it accidentally, it’s free reign to look at it, although not for an unreasonable amount of time. Also, while we can look, we can’t copy or take for ourselves, because that’s just creepy and sad.

  36. Mark Grummell says:

    For my company, my security cams WILL catch any tech doing anything. Except in the bathroom of course, but why would you take a customer machine in there?
    there is about 5 sqft in our shop I cannot see from my office, and its under the front desk. If I can’t see a customer unit, there is a problem.
    Moreso if I cannot read the screen.
    This is also why we don’t do onsite repairs.
    I don’t care whats on your personal laptop, phone, ect.
    I don’t care what paper you hand me…
    Do the job, do it right, and only do the job.
    This makes for a FAST, AND PROFITABLE service group.