The Softer Side Of Sears: Craftsman Lifetime Warranty Doesn't Apply To Katrina Victims

UPDATE: This has nothing to do with Katrina victims. Clarification: Craftsman Lifetime Warranty Doesn’t Apply To Rusty Tools

New Orleans Sears, in a misguided attempt to steal the reverence earned by insurance companies, is refusing to honor the lifetime warranty on Craftsman tools. The unlimited, unconditional, full lifetime warranty, lets you bring in a stick and call it a hammer so long it still bears that precious, preservative Craftsman logo. Unless you live in New Orleans, according to Rufus.

I took some of my Craftsman tools — sockets and socket drivers – back for exchange after Kartina under the FULL UNLIMITED WARRANTY and was told they are not accepting any rusty tools notwithstanding the FULL UNLIMITED WARRANTY. My hurt puppy response got one socket driver exchanged but the sales staff told me I’m out of luck on the rest of my Craftsman tools.

That’s not right. Our neighbor haunts garage sales in search of rusty Craftsman tools to exchange at Sears. He has never been denied on account of rust. Why would Sears possibly make such a heartless change of policy?

Rufus’ email, inside.


Greetings from the eye of Hurricane Katrina. Things are still pretty messed up down here. Insurance companies are denying coverage because the class 5 hurricane didnt have any wind so they dont have to pay. Seems Sears got inspired by this creative interpretation of the insurance contract.

Sears Craftsman hand tools (sockets, wrenches etc.) are sold with a FULL UNJLIMITED WARRANTY. I took some of my Craftsman tools — sockets and socket drivers – back for exchange after Kartina under the FULL UNLIMITED WARRANTY and was told they are not accepting any rusty tools notwithstanding the FULL UNLIMITED WARRANTY. My hurt puppy response got one socket driver exchanged but the sales staff told me I’m out of luck on the rest of my Craftsman tools.

The salesman said its only after Katrina, in areas affected, they dont want to pay for rusted tools down here.

Please, someone, tell us in the comments that Sears hasn’t succumbed to such an offensive policy. — CAREY GREENBERG-BERGER
(Photo: e-magic)

Comments

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  1. Sudonum says:

    Do what I did, take them to a Sears out of the area. You don’t have to go too far. I went to the one in Lafayette. It is about 2 hours away. And don’t take them ALL in at once. Take a few tools every time you go and do it a few trips.

    I didn’t bother with my sockets though. They were a litte discolored, but not rusty. Soaked them in WD 40 and they’re almost as good as new.

  2. hibiscusroto says:

    Usually when I read about companies screwing people over on this site my thought is either “I’m not surprised, and I already don’t do business with this company” or “I’m not surprised, time to STOP doing business with that company”. I’ve been a loyal Sears customer since as long as I can remember and was bummed out when I read this post. I’ve forwarded a link to Sears customer service looking for an explanation. I really don’t want to stop shopping at Sears…I hope they make this right.

  3. mantari says:

    Question: Is this a cosmetic condition, or does it actually affect performance?

    • Cory Mitton says:

      Rust is a dangerous thing. The color does not matter, it just indicates that the rust is eating away at the metal. Being a mechanic and having a toolbox full of rusty craftsman tools is no good. I got pretty nasty with the Sears in Lafayette, Indiana after they refused to exchange my tools. They said that rust isn’t a good enough reason to exchange them, then I showed them how the corrosion had eaten away at the teeth on my sockets and those stupid bastards just shrugged…

  4. sleepydumbdude says:

    I worked at Sears. It was store policy when I worked there back in 2001-2004 not to take rusty tools back. Its just that sometimes a customer brings 1 back and I’d just go ahead and act like it slipped through. If someone came up with a whole bunch of them then I’d probably tell them no or just call the manager.
    I had denied customers many times because they came in with a bucket full of rusty tools.

  5. homerjay says:

    @sleepydumbdude: It may be your store policy not to take back rusty tools, but does that local policy attempt to circumvent your corporate policy concerning tools?

  6. snowferret says:

    time to call a lawyer

  7. mconfoy says:

    snowferret’s comment is what is wrong with this country

  8. razz4901 says:

    @mconfoy:
    snowferret is standing up to a big American Corporation that is not living up to its word…Corporations understand lawyers…sometimes you have to fight fire with fire….

  9. bhall03 says:

    Seems to me this activity, “Our neighbor haunts garage sales in search of rusty Craftsman tools to exchange at Sears“, is just wrong. Your neighbor probably thinks he is taking advantage of Sears but he is really either driving up the cost of new tools or he could be the reason this stance has been taken.

    I believe Mantari has a valid question, is it cosmetic only or does the rust affect the functionality of the tool?

  10. tadowguy says:

    How come almost 75% of the stories on the Consumerist are something like this:

    … so I went to my local … and the manager there said … despite what the website says and the official policy … therefore Company XXX should NEVER be trusted again!

    It seems like the truism is not that Companies suck, but that local store managers are morons.

  11. Grrrrrrr, now with two buns made of bacon. says:

    I think probably the best thing is to take them out of the area, and in small batches. You could also try soaking them in naval jelly, but I’m not sure what this does to the plating (it’s great for removing rust on regular steel…phosphoric acid and all that).

    You could also get a wire brush that goes on a bench grinder and remove a lot of the rust that way.

    Even if the rachets are siezed, if you at least clean the rust off, they’ll probably take them. (I have the worst luck with Craftsman ratchets..the mechanisms always seem to give out).

  12. NeoteriX says:

    @tadowguy:
    Well, it seems the point is that Corporate should have better control over their local stores and enforce policies better.

    What’s the point of buying a product you think will have one advertised policy but going to the local store and receiving different treatment?

  13. thisiskspraydad says:

    I’d actually side with Sears on this one…my interpretation of the warranty is satisfaction with the manner in which the tools perform their function…not warrantied against all events.

    If I use a saw as a hammer and it breaks I shouldn’t expect Sears to cover that..nor should they cover rust that is an ‘act of God’ or negligence of the owner…

    People need to start taking some personal responsibility and stop trying to get someone else (Sears) to bail them out.

  14. MommaJ says:

    It’s a product warranty, not a promise that no matter what goes wrong in your life (hurricanes, fires, rust) you can get brand new tools. If the tool is defective, it’ll be replaced. Sears never promises to replace tools you’ve allowed to rust, or save you from not insuring your household belongings. If a store is accepting rusty tools, it’s purely as a customer relations move, not as a warranty matter. As for the friend who buys rusty tools at tag sales to turn in for new ones…there are no words.

  15. TPK says:

    The problem is that Sears has already enjoyed the benefit of having a Full Unlimited Warranty, in the form of increased sales of their products. Now that it is the customers’ turn to enjoy the benefit of this policy, it is absoultely unfair for the policy to suddenly be abandoned.

    I think another word for this is fraud.

  16. Nygdan says:

    Sears isn’t honouring the warranty because it’d break the bank to replace every tool in southern Louisiana and the other areas affected by Katrina. That doesn’t make it right, but they’re not rejecting the replacement because of ‘cosmetic issues’ or because they beleive that its not a ‘manufacturer’s defect’ that resulted in the tool being useless. It has got to be an economic decision.
    And, of course, it might be WORSE for them to have this sort of bad press get out, than to just replace all the tools that people bring in from Katrina areas. So big up on The Consumerist and others for reporting this. Heck, perhaps they’ll take a page from the Quiznos manual and make a ‘tool giveaway’ into a PR event.

  17. Bourque77 says:

    I have used several tools in my life and rust typically dosent affect they workings of the tool. Sears will take back your tools if they are defective, break, or are otherwise unusable. Sorry but rust doesnt fall in that category, I’m with Sears on this. If you can show how the rust is causing the tool to work improperly (which I doubt it is) then I’ll side against sears.

  18. Zweites says:

    Wait… if a manufacturer’s defect caused the product to be unusable, I’d return it for a new one.

    Anyone would!

    You mean to tell me THAT is the extent of the much vaunted Craftsman Full Unlimited Warranty?

    Is that even a SELLING point?

    People need to take “Personal responsibility” for an act of God? My ass! If Sears wants to hype a “FULL AND UNLIMITED” warranty, they need to support it. I expect the “full and unlimited warranty” to be just that, if advertised as such.

    I haven’t read the fine print, but certainly the craftsman lifetime guarantee is presented as being all inclusive by their sales staff who have assured me as much when they were trying to make the sale.

  19. zolielo says:

    I thought that Sears does not cover abuse, fire, or rust in their warranty paper work.

  20. saaron34 says:

    @Zweites

    I haven’t read the fine print either (couldn’t find it, actually), but customer abuse (rust) of the product is not Sears’ problem or any company’s problem. I wouldn’t expect it to be covered under a warranty, even an unlimited one. The purpose of the warranty is to cover the customers using the tools to their breaking point, which is supposed to be for a very long time. The unlimited-forever warranty is so that when your great-grandpa’s ratchet snaps in your hands, you can take it to any Sears, without a receipt, and they will hand you a new one. The box full of rusty tools is not a product failing due to wear or workmanship issues; it is end user neglet. Now, in the “special” case of Katrina damaged tools, put yourself in the store’s position. If they take pity on everyone with tools rusted by a Katrina flood, this sets a precedent. Now EVERYONE who had Craftsmen tools go through a flood or are otherwise rusty can take them back to Sears and demand new tools. There is no way to differentiate between Katrina tools and tools left out in the rain. You need to deal with your insurance company and scrutinize their policies on this matter.

    And indeed, I will agree that we have a major problem in America with accountability. Everyone is so willing to run to a lawyer for everything, when really they need a lesson in responsibility. Leaving your tools in the rain is not Sears’ fault; replacing a tool collection damaged by catastrophe is not Sears’ problem. Tripping over your own feet on your neighbor’s sidewalk is not your neighbor’s problem.

    I think we should use company policies for what they are for, using our sense to guide us. As huge as these corporations are, and as much as we’d all like to screw them as we all feel are screwed, we have to take a step back and decide if we are part of the problem. Abusing policies designed to keep good customers coming back does not bode well for a group of people (consumerist.com) calling for businesses to do good business.

  21. Helvetian says:

    AFAIK the warranty is full, unlimited and without condition. The fact is, some local stores like to institute further conditions or policies regarding exchanges and returns. I’m really unhappy with Sears about this. Especially the Katrina people, very awful thing to do.

  22. Russellkhan says:

    The fine print:
    ***
    Craftsman hand tools are guaranteed forever. If any Craftsman hand tool ever fails to give complete satisfaction, return it to Sears for free repair or replacement. This warranty gives you specific rights and you may also have other rights which vary from state to state. Other Craftsman tools are covered by limited warranties.
    ***

    This doesn’t seem to leave room for exceptions based on fires, cosmetic damage, hurricanes, rust or manager’s mood.

    I’m actually thinking about rounding up all my Craftsman tools and returning them because the unhonored warranties I’m hearing about are enough to make them “fail to give complete satisfaction.” (I did a bit of Googling after running into this post in order to find the warranty text and in the process ran into numerous similar complaints on forums such as bobvila.com and toolmonger)

  23. crankymediaguy says:

    OK, what part of “unconditional” don’t you people get? Sears didn’t institute that because they’re nice Christian people. They came up with it because it is a SELLING POINT designed to cause people to choose Sears’ Craftsman tools over other brands.

    Either “unconditional” means NO CONDITIONS WHATSOEVER or it has NO meaning at all.

    No one put a gun to Sears’ head and made them use that in their advertising. “Unconditional” means that I can bring back the tool for replacement if I suddenly decide it has a demon living in it or for any other reason at all.

    Please do not start interpreting “unconditional” to mean “unless it’s rusty” or anything else. It’s an ABSOLUTE promise to the customer. Period.

    They made a promise and now they’re reneging on it.

  24. sleepydumbdude says:

    It’s corporate policy. I worked at three Sears. One in Evansville, IN, one in Daytona, FL, and one in St Louis. It was easy to get a job at the others with the store transfer.
    I always thought it was a stupid rule and would usually just let them unless a manager was behind me or it was a bunch of stuff. Most the time i just didn’t care to hear the customer bitchin when I told them no.
    I was told it was to keep people who come from yardsales from making returns.

  25. whoda says:

    From the Sears website:
    “A Warranty is a contract between the purchaser of a product and the company that produced the product that details the components, duration, and circumstances by which a defect in the product will be remedied.”

    Rust isn’t a defect….it’s physics.

  26. IdontKNOW says:

    Well, I am glad that their are people out there with the same thoughts I have on this issue. As for the ones saying to take personal responsibility nice advice, but it has no relevance in this matter. From what I read on here you seem to have a “FULL and UNLIMITED LIFE TIME WARRANTY.” I interpret it as if anything happens to it I can replace it at no cost regardless of how the product became unusable. I forgot the name of the person that posted about how financially hurt sears would be if they replaced all of Louisiana’s damaged Craftsmen tools, but I believe that is the case here. If I was a New Orleaner, I’d file a class action law suit for false advertisement. I for one wouldn’t put up with this and I’m sorry for your loss of shiny tools.

  27. Rajio says:

    it really depends on the specific tools in question – if the damage effects the usability of the tool or if its just cosmetic. thats the key factor as to who is to blame here.

  28. rockergal says:

    Ok, I am on the side of sears on this one. My husband is a big craftsman fan and has used their return policy many times because of tools breaking etc. The policy is set in mind for a small volume of returns. if they would take tools back from Katrina from owners that did not take are of their tools it would break the bank and raise the price of many tools. (not to mention it goes down the food scale and eventually affects the workers at the factory)
    Sorry but there were plenty of warnings for Katrina and if you have an expensive collection of tools be prepared and have a waterproof toolbox (thats what my husband has and we are not even in a flood zone)

    If you really do take care of your tools, you might want to go to a different store and not with a bucket full of tools. that raises suspicion in anyones eyes.

    Just MHO

  29. lilricky says:

    I just read the warranty for home use Craftsman tools, and rust is not covered under it. However, if your tools did get ruined by Katrina, I would suggest using Navel Jelly as one previous poster suggested. I works great on my tools for surface rust, it should clean them up enough for exchange at your local Sears. However, to that guy who goes around to garage sales looking for rusty tools to exchange, you are a leech and are taking advantage of the warranty. People like you are going to make Sears require a receipt for exchange if you keep that up. Sears should be applauded for this warranty, even with the rust exclusion.

  30. hop says:

    i stopped using sears last year when i had a problem getting my under warrenty refridgerator repaired in the hottest part of july………….we now use a local applaince store for all our appliances…..sears sucketh (along with best buys)

  31. Sudonum says:

    @rockergal:
    “Sorry but there were plenty of warnings for Katrina”

    Get in touch with reality woman. Let me paint you a picture. You live somewhere along the Gulf Coast or Atlantic Seaboard. This includes all you New Yorkers and New Englanders too. On Monday you’re watching the local news and the Weather Man comes on a says that there is a “system” forming that we need to keep our eye on. You have heard this a million times before. So you make note of it and go about your business. You tune into the news the next night. It’s crossing the Carribean and doing damage to some third world tropical island. The “Cone of Confussion” in the US mainland ranges from Texas to the Florida Peninsula. Or maybe from Florida all the way up the Carolinas. All the people that live within 100 miles of the coast there are now put on warning. Ok, you take note of it and pray one of you fellow americans is the “lucky” one now.

    On Wednesday morning they have now narrowed the “Cone” down some. You are smack dab in the middle, but there is enough leeway to the left or right that is could still pass you.

    This is now 3 days out. You are someone living from paycheck to paycheck. Not necessarily the people you saw in the pictures at the Superdome. People with a car and some cash, but just maybe a paycheck or 2 from trouble.

    You now have 3 days to decide if you are going to evacuate. And if you do evacuate which way do you go? Maybe you have family 500 miles west or east. But they’re right on the edge of the “Cone”. It’s not likely that the storm will hit them. But what if it does, that also means it’s going to bypass you, and they might be headed your way. You start to make a plan. Did I also mention that you have a spouse and 2 kids and drive a mid-sized sedan? That you’ve evacuated several times before, only to have the storm shift and go past you with just some 30 mph winds? That each time you do evacuate you miss several days of work, not to mention the cost of this little “vacation” and what 2 or 3 of them do every year to your budget?

    The next day, Thursday, and the “Cone” is smaller. but you are clearly near the center. Odds are you are going to feel some effects. It is a Cat 4 and could go Cat 5. You start boarding up the windows of the house, bringing in anything thats outside that could get airborne and become a projectile, that means things that can weigh as much as 50 pounds if they are large enough to catch some wind. You hope you neighbors do the same. You’ve done the drill before. Grab the “Important” file, Birth certificats, passports, tac papers, insurance papers. Start arguing with the kids about how many of their toys and things you can take. Making sure they have enough clothes for 2-3 days, because thats how long these things usually take. Do you have a pet? I won’t burden you with those logistics in this scenario. No, no pets.

    Ok, it’s Thurday evening. According to the Weather Channel the storm is going to make landfall in about 36 hours, However there is STILL a 30% chance it could miss you. Do you stay or do you go? And more importanatly, WHERE THE FUCK DID I STORE MY CRAFTSMAN TOOLS BECAUSE I KNOW THOSE FUCKS WILL TRY TO SCREW ME ON THE GUARANTEE IF MY HOUSE FLOODS!

  32. Sudonum says:

    @rockergal:
    Oh, and send me alink on you husbands “waterproof” tool box.

  33. Musician78 says:

    @Sudonum:

    Very, very well done.

  34. mjw2025 says:

    Why should they take back a rusty tool. It’s not a defect but rather failure to take care of it. With that kind of thinking one could abuse a tool in anyway he wants and then expect a new one to replace it.

  35. spanky says:

    What does the warranty say?

    From this page:

    Craftsman hand tools are guaranteed forever. If any Craftsman hand tool ever fails to give complete satisfaction, return it to Sears for free repair or replacement.

    I don’t see any exclusions, for rust or anything else. As long as the tools were covered under that warranty, Sears needs to accept their ‘personal responsibility’ to abide by the terms they agreed to.

    I’m sure they did a careful cost-benefit analysis of their policies, and determined that the inevitable costs were worth the increased sales.

    If they want to further limit their warranties on future sales, they can go ahead and do that. But they can’t just back out of existing agreements now because it’s convenient or cost-effective to do so. They knew the risks they were taking.

  36. MoCo says:

    When I hear the “store policy” line, I say, “In that, I will take this to small claims court. You can talk about your policy, and I’ll talk about the law. Who do you think the judge will agree with?”

  37. puka_pai says:

    @Sudonum: Excellent. Very well written, indeed.

    @rockergal: Tell you what. Take your husband’s waterproof toolbox and put it in your bathtub after you fill it with water. Check for air bubbles — if there are any, it’s not really waterproof. If you’re lucky enough to not have bubbles, add a canister of salt and let the box sit there for a week or so, just like most Katrina victims’ stuff did. Then tell me how his tools fared.

    FWIW, on Sears’ website right now, when you shop for Craftsman tools, the site states “guaranteed forever”. I don’t see any exceptions there. An absolute warranty is ABSOLUTE, there are no exceptions. Not for customer abuse, not for rust, not for acts of G-d, not for cranky store managers, nothing. It seems a simple concept to me.

  38. artimusbill says:

    I think it is absurd that people expect that warranty to cover storm damage. The warranty clearly is meant to cover tool defects and failure during normal use. Sears had nothing to do with Katrina and the damage it did.

    This is especially true with the guy collecting rusted tools from garage sales in an attempt to scam Sears. That should be treated as criminal activity. I don’t know if people should invest in water-proof tool boxes, but they SHOULD realize that a broken/defective tool warranty would not cover acts of god, natural disasters.

  39. rten says:

    Sounds like a car warranty issue I ran into. I bought the comprehensive warranty (say what you like about it being un-needed), but part of the contract was to provide all parts/labor coverage, free towing, and a free loaner car until the car was fixed. The hood hinge was broke and at highway speeds the hood would jump every once in a while. I brought it in 130 miles before the end of the warranty, but told “it’s too close to the end of the warranty”. They admitted it was a covered repair “right now” but, but I was SOL, since the parts/labor/loaner would be used after the warranty period, assuming I put 130 more miles on (the shop couldn’t fit in the job to fix it … it’s not my problem).

    I wound up having to get the agreement which stated “if any warrantied items fails during the covered period we will cover…..” It failed during the covered period, that’s all that matters. I’m on the side of the consumer, don’t take money for a product where part of what’s advertised is (insurance/guarantees/unlimited warranty/etc.) and then change rules when it becomes too expensive to make good on your claim.

    Guarantees and warranties are liabilities and risks, you lose sometimes. Sears/Kmart no better way to kill your customer base than to not stand behind your product.

  40. unsharpmask says:

    Hey, when you buy a Craftsman tool, you are paying a premium. That added cost goes to the unlimited warranty. Whether you return one tool or a tool box full, they should cover you. The added cost when purchasing Craftsman tools applies to a tool box of tools too. Sears wants their cake and eat it. You can buy non warrantied tools at discount from other makers that sell them at 1/2 to 1/3 the price from manufactures in China. And you wonder why made in the USA doesn’t mean anything anymore. Thanks, Sears.

  41. WV.Hillbilly says:

    Rust is a cosmetic issue. It doesn’t affect the operation of the tool. The warranty is meant for tools that break.
    From a Sears rep:
    “The lifetime warranty is meant to protect the customer in the event that a tool is defective or breaks under normal use. It is not meant to cover tools that are damaged/destroyed/lost due to fire, water, theft or other natural
    causes. Rust is not covered by the warranty.”

    Should Chrysler give you a new car if you’ve got a 100,00 mile powertrain warranty and now your motor is full of water?

    File an insurance claim and quit worrying about it. If you didn’t have insurance- then why should Sears pay for your mistakes?

    If you use sudonum’s example you’ve just pissed away 4 days of preparation by waiting until Thursday to get your shit together to evacuate. Missing work? Better than missing your life.

    Things to do in the future:
    1. Buy some fucking flood insurance. Claim your rusty tools there.
    2. Have an evacuation plan. Have all your important papers together. Don’t wait until the last minute.
    3. Buy some steel wool & oil. Clean off your tools. They’re mostly chrome plated. I’ll guarantee (there’s that word again) that you can clean the rust off of those sockets.

    And the guy that buys tools at yardsales and exchanges them at Sears? What a scumbag.

    Everyone wants to blame everyone else for their mistakes.

  42. Mr. Gunn says:

    Has anyone else noticed the uptick in company apologists here lately? Interesting fluke or sockpuppetry?

  43. nikolai says:

    Sears tried to pull a bait-and-switch on me in the 80′s. They had some car speakers on sale, then when I went in to get them, Sears was like, “Oh were out of those, wouldn’t you like these?” and proceeded to show me a more expensive set, which was much more than I needed or wanted to pay. I insisted on a rain check and got it after a lot of hemming and hawing on Sears part. I called week after week and each time told the auto accessory dept manager “Hello, this is John Doe, and I have a rain check for the XYZ speakers that I would like to fill, do you have them in yet?” Each time the response was “No, sorry, those haven’t come in yet.” After the third time I had a friend call in asking about these same speakers, and viola, Sears had them, and they were NOT on sale, but they DID have them in stock. I promptly went in, grabbed a set off the shelf and when I checked out the manager was running the cash register. He looked crest fallen as he honored the rain check, and was surpised to see me there getting my original deal. I KNOW that jerk was trying to keep from honoring that rain check, that putz. Another time my wife broke a globe on a Sears stand up lamp, and Sears said they wouldn’t replace it, and that I’d have to buy a whole new lamp. I asked for the manager and insisted on Sears rplacing it, as they had plenty of other replacment parts, why not for their furniture line? I had to go to Sears three times and they kept putting me off, telling me the manager wasn’t in, etc, but I perservered and finally did get in to see the assistant manager and told him I would not give up until Sears got me a replacement globe, which I would be glad to pay for. He said he would do his best to locate one and eventually did locate one that they couldn’t sell because it had a blemish. It was covered by the shade, so that was good enough for me, at least they finally did SOMETHING for me, but it took a lot on my part, and in the 80′s you only had the telephone or you could write a letter, or make a live visit which is not convenient for many folks.

  44. robblerobble says:

    From the “Toolmonger” article:

    Craftsman hand tools are guaranteed forever. If any Craftsman hand tool ever fails to give complete satisfaction, return it to Sears for free repair or replacement. This warranty gives you specific rights and you may also have other rights which vary from state to state. Other Craftsman tools are covered by limited warranties.

    In the minds of a consumer, the tems “stainless steel” under a coat of rust arguably entitles them to repair or replacement under the terms covered by this warranty. Under the terms of the waranty, there appears to be no specific time in which Sears/Craftsman is obligated to satisfy these conditions. Were the NOLA Sears at all PR savvy, they would happily accept any/all rusted tool returns, and ask the customer to return in a week after they had “repaired” the tools by scrubbing all of the rust off of them.

  45. spanky says:

    @WV.Hillbilly: Show me where it says, in the warranty, that rust isn’t covered. Not what some Sears rep says it means. Show me where the warranty actually says that.

    The warranty I saw, and quoted above, doesn’t contain any such exclusion.

    Your armchair evacuation plan is irrelevant.

    Everyone wants to blame everyone else for their mistakes.

    Heh. Yeah.

  46. Buran says:

    @Nygdan:

    If it costs them too much, too bad. You can’t go back on a contract after it is signed. The warranty was in effect when the tools were sold. It also didn’t say “except in New Orleans”. Therefore, Sears is committing fraud — and I don’t see any proof of any effort by corporate to rein in this illegal behavior. So yes, it is time to call in the lawyers.

    And what’s with the ridiculous corporate-apologist behavior around here?

  47. AcidReign says:

    …..Sears is shafting those folks. I hope they get what’s coming.

    …..I rolled into New Orleans back in June of 1991, during a massive rainstorm. Some kids may have fallen into a canal, and they shut off the pumps. The city flooded while I was trying to get to the French Quarter. Rolling around midtown with water trickling into your doors is scary as all hell! I managed to keep the engine running and get to high ground, but that car stank of swamp rot for years thereafter, and there was no getting rid of it! That cured me of any notion of wanting to actually live near the Gulf!

  48. capitalass says:

    Wow, It’s nice to see people getting personal over some tools. I guess if there is anything worth getting personal over, it’s your your tool.

    But really, this is Sears. Please don’t insult Katrina victims to defend Sears.

  49. archer117 says:

    I have to go with Sears on this one. The tools are warranted against breakage from normal use. Why should Sears eat the damage from the tools getting all wet and rusty, when that was never what was meant to be covered by the warranty?

  50. g4lt says:

    “it’s rusty” is not a warranty issue. “it broke because of rust” is. keep using it until it fails, then bring it back and you have a complaint. as of now, all you have is an issue with cosmetics, and no tool manufacturer will honor a warranty under those circumstances, nor should they. tools ain’t supposed to be pretty

  51. The Walking Eye says:

    I know my brother’s taken old rusty tools that were bought at Sears and exchanged them w/o question, so this story is contrary to my experiences.

    It’s gotta have something to do w/ what tool it is as well. A rusty ratchet or pair of pliers is waiting to fail, a rusty socket or screwdriver should be cleaned and all will be good.

    I’m a little in the middle on this one, since this seems more of an insurance claim than having Sears foot the bill for an act of god. Sears does, however, need to own up to their warranty promises and have a consistent exchange policy enforced across the board. When you can go outside of NO and get your tools exchanged, no questions asked, then there’s a problem.

  52. spanky says:

    @archer117:

    Bullshit.

    Craftsman hand tools are guaranteed forever. If any Craftsman hand tool ever fails to give complete satisfaction, return it to Sears for free repair or replacement.

    Where’s the part about “breakage from normal use”? Where’s the exemption for rust? If there’s some other warranty, cite it. Post the exact wording that allows them to make exceptions.

    All you people making all these confident claims about exemptions to the warranty should be able to quote the parts you’re referencing.

  53. monkeyboy says:

    Ok, I lived in New Orleans when Katrina hit. I’m siding on Sears on this one. If your tools were damaged due to the flood, then you should have claimed it on your flood insurance. For those that did claim on their insurance, this is called “double dipping”. Rusted tools, this can happen to anyone. Natural disaster, Sears cannot control this (nor anyone else).

  54. crankymediaguy says:

    Please allow me to repeat myself:

    “Either ‘unconditional’ means NO CONDITIONS WHATSOEVER or it has NO meaning at all.

    “Please do not start interpreting ‘unconditional’ to mean ‘unless it’s rusty’ or anything else. It’s an ABSOLUTE promise to the customer. Period.

    “They made a promise and now they’re reneging on it.”

    You people who are making excuses for Sears are simply ignoring the very clear meaning of the word “unconditional.” Please explain this contradiction or admit that Sears is trying to break its promise to its customers.

    Why are you defending a company attempting to violate its own promise?

    Is this earth-shaking? No, but no one ever said it was.

    Yes, I fear the sock puppets are trying to blunt Consumerist’s impact on business’ shady practices.

  55. hibiscusroto says:

    here’s a copy of the letter that I received from Sears..

    Dear Mr. Vigliotti,

    Thank you for contacting Sears.

    Unfortunately, we do not have a document that lists the specific
    warranties of all Craftsman tools. However, we do have databases that do
    list the specific warranties of the tools on an individual basis.

    A general list of Craftsman tools that are covered by the lifetime
    warranty would include: ratchets, sockets, wrenches, screwdrivers and
    hammers. Some tools that are not covered by the lifetime warranty (even
    though they are Craftsman branded) are: taps, dies, saw blades, drill bits
    and torque wrenches.

    The Sears store can be contacted for all warranty issues. Since they can
    actually inspect and exchange broken/defective tools, the store must be
    contacted for warranty issues. The lifetime warranty is meant to protect
    the customer in the event that a tool is defective or breaks under normal
    use. It is not meant to cover tools that are damaged/destroyed/lost due
    to fire, water, theft or other natural causes.

    Thank you for choosing Sears to help you create the good life.


    Sincerely,

    Kevin R.
    Sears Customer Care
    HomeCentral@customerservice.sears.com
    1-800-4-MY-HOME (1-800-469-4663)

  56. poornotignorant says:

    @Mr. Gunn: With all the recent national publicity I agree there seems to be corporate flunkies misrepresenting themselves here. What’s the solution?

  57. ZonzoMaster says:

    @Buran:

    I’m probably paranoid… but there might be some company workers defending the companies in each post. There seems to be many people defending a company for totally unfair practices. And yes i think they should respect the “guaranteed forever” part.

  58. Don Roberto says:

    Bingo! tadowguy’s got it! I’ve worked retail under different managers for different companies. It seems that each time we got a new store manager, or even loss prevention manager, new policies for accepting returns and honoring price matches were handed out for all of the salespersons to sign. Of course after many complaints (possibly to the head office in chi.. i mean the head office)things would just get back to the old policy. Most changes didn’t stick unless we got a new ceo.

  59. Sudonum says:

    @WV.Hillbilly:
    1.) I had/have flood insurance. Got a handsome check too. Didn’t include all my belongings because it only covers UP TO $80,000. All the personal belongings I lost totaled $95,000. The insurance company/Federal Flood Insurance program pays actual value, not replacement value. Can’t buy replacement value for any type of flood insurance. So I get around $50,000 for almost double that in belongings.

    2.) You do have a plan. And it also depends on where the storm is coming from. One of the more popular evactuation areas in the New Orleans area is Houston. Is that wise? Not if you watched Rita. Did you see the traffic jams? And that was with people leaving 3 days before the storm came. They had a plan too. How come the State of Texas didn’t? Thousands of cars ran out of gas on the interstae idling in traffic. Thanks God Rita fizzled out some and stayed more easterly. Or you REALLY would have seen some carnage on the highways of Texas.

    You keep you tank filled, you keep you bags packed. You have all your important papers ready to go. And then you wait and try to see where the storm is going before you determine if you are heading north, east, west, or some combination thereof.

    3.) I did, I bought many cans of WD 40 and some brass wire brushes. Hell Sears wasn’t open and I needed some tools to get some work done on the house. I cleaned all my sockets and wrenches and my ratchets, which I also soaked in a can full of WD40. They are discolored and stained, but otherwise work fine. I also had some carpenters tools, like hammers and squares. I cleaned those too. However they are rusting. They are made of chrome steel. They should not rust. They are defective. It took the caustic wash that was the flood to start this process. My chrome steel sockets and wrenches aren’t rusting. They went through the same wash.

    I moved to NO in 2000 Prior to that I lived in CA for over 30 years. I went though more earthquakes than I can count. Even before Katrina hit I loathed hurricane season. Give me a damn earthquake any day of the week over a hurricane. An earthquake hits and you deal with it. Some houses get damaged some don’t. A hurricane starts brewing and then you start playing the “stay or go” dance. And if you’ve gone through it and evacuated a few times, been stuck in traffic, only to get to Jackson, MS or Nashville, only to find that you can’t get a room for ANY amount of money…..

    Anyway, I’ve rambled on enough, I’ll get off the soapbox with one final comment. Until you have gone through it, NEVER say “you shoulda done x”

  60. Nygdan says:

    @Buran:
    Yes, I understand that Sears should be following up with the warranty. Thats pretty obvious. Unconditional is unconditional.
    As far as bringing in lawyers….over some tools from sears? I know that a large collection of tools can be pretty expensive, but it still seems like it’d cost you more in the end. They’d probably cave in quickly to receiving an actual legal notice though, and then continue to tell other people that they can’t get the replacement.

    THe point is, it was an economic decision from sears. It has nothing to do with the intent or language of the warranty. If they accepted returns from people from Katrina, they’d take a huge economic hit. They know that there’s not going to be any largescale legal action taken against them, and it’d probably cost them less to bury the other side in the legal system than to replace all the tools lost in Katrina.

    “And what’s with the ridiculous corporate-apologist behavior around here?”
    If you’re refering to me, I never said that what they were doing was acceptable, legal, peachy keen, or anything else. I fail to see why a person having a different opinion should mean that they must be some corporate shill. Perhaps its……a difference of opinion.

  61. monkeyboy says:

    Anyone have a link to Sears Craftsman warranty? I don’t see it mentioned on the site. I remember seeing the warranty info when I bought my tool set about 8 years ago. Last time I was in Kmart (boy I hate that place), they had a entire Craftsmen section. I know that Sears bought Kmart, but I think this puts down the Craftsman name.

  62. Papa K says:

    Rusty tools don’t work? Have you tried cleaning them? How do we know he wasn’t collecting random tools (ten hammers, twenty wrenches) and trying to collect on what’s obviously been salvaged tools (meaning, benefiting from others loss?)

    I’m just playing devil’s advocate. No doubt some mechanics are going to get hosed because Sears didn’t prepare for events like this – much like some of you psaying how the people should have been prepared.

  63. saaron34 says:

    As far as the corporate apologist comments above, if you are referring to me, I will admit my last posts’ paragraph could be interpreted incorrectly. My opinion on the story obviously differs from a very vocal majority. That’s fine. Having one’s own ideas is rarely the easy path.

    I am coming from the angle of customers needing to understand good business as much as the business needs to understand and make good on it. That said, I am not arguing what their policy SAYS. Unlimited and unconditional means just that, and they should stand by it. If they don’t, action needs to be taken. However, customers need to understand what it is for also. This is where I think everyone gets rubbed the wrong way. Everyone is so hung up on policy and stabs a finger at what the warranty says without a second thought. I believe this policy, while unconditional, it is not intended for someone to replace their entire collection whenever they feel like it. Sure, you ARE able to under their policy. But should you? I read story after story about other companies not doing the right thing (I think of verizon), and having questionable moral standards. Shouldn’t its customers stop and think about how they would like to be treated? I’m not saying institute a personal policy to always worry about how good of a customer you are, and never taking advantage of a company policy or coupon-stacking or all the things we talk about, I’m saying use your head. Just because something is offered, doesn’t necessarily mean you should take them for all they are worth.

    But, maybe I’m wrong. Maybe that thought already crossed Sears’ mind when they made up the policy so long ago. Maybe they assumed there would be people going to yard sales and returning someone elses tools. Maybe they assumed flood-damaged tools would come back to them, and they would have to replace them. Maybe its not a big deal to them. But my gut tells me its wrong to take advantage of a warranty intended to serve as a good-neighbor policy. (yes you can argue it is an incentive to buy their product over some elses, generate future business, etc.)

    Also, I may have gotten a bit accusatory at the last sentence of my first post. I regret that and apologize. I should have explained what I meant more clearly. I Hope my above paragraph does that.

    Hopefully you’ll see what I am saying, and argue it healthily, not attack it or contemplate how to remove users that don’t agree.

    Regards,
    Aaron

  64. crankymediaguy says:

    saaron34 said:

    “I believe this policy, while unconditional, it is not intended for someone to replace their entire collection whenever they feel like it. Sure, you ARE able to under their policy. But should you?”

    Is there any evidence that the original poster was trying to do anything like that?

    Apparantly, to Sears (and a lot of you posters as well), “unconditional” doesn’t mean what the dictionary says it does.

    Imagine that I buy something that says it has a 90-day warranty. After 65 days, it stops working, so I take it back to the store where I bought it.

    The salesman says he won’t replace it. I ask why and he tells me that 65 days is close enough to 91 days and therefore my purchase is out of warranty.

    Would you support that? If not, why not? My mythical salesman wouldn’t be doing anything that Sears isn’t doing–reinterpreting the clear meaning of a promise.

    If “unconditional” doesn’t mean what the dictionary says it means, then it will mean whatever any individual at any Sears store SAYS it means. How is that acceptable?

  65. cwm9 says:

    “Well, officer, it was my INTENT not to get drunk tonight and then drive and hit that lamp post, so you can’t arrest me.”

    “I didn’t INTEND to break my daughters arm when I grabbed her and twisted her arm!”

    “When we wrote that bit about ‘any Craftsman hand tool ever fails to give complete satisfaction’ we never INTENDED the definition of satisfaction to include rust!”

    Too bad the law doesn’t work on best intentions.

  66. Hoss says:

    Sears: We think we got a decent product and will back it up with a generous warranty if we’re wrong.

    Customer: Ok, let me find a way to screw you.

    (Some people got big bawlz)

  67. DuckFOO says:

    I personally agree with Sears on this one. And I think it is wrong to accuse people of things just because they have a different opinion on a subject.

  68. Red_Eye says:

    While I am not thrilled with returning a tool just because of some surface rust here is the warranty published on one of their mechanics tool sets recently (http://www.sears.com/download/misc/Parts_33263.pdf).

    “FULL UNLIMITED WARRANTY ON CRAFTSMAN MECHANICS TOOLS
    If any CRAFTSMAN Hand Tool ever fails to give complete satisfaction, RETURN IT TO THE NEAREST SEARS
    STORE IN THE UNITED STATES and Sears will replace it, free of charge. This warranty gives you specific
    legal rights and you may also have other rights which vary from state to state.”

    Fails to give satisfaction is fairly subjective, if I am unsatisfied by a drawer full of rusty but still functional tools under that wording I can take it in for replacement. Sorry Sears hate to see you screwed but you have to play by your own rules.

  69. rockergal says:


    @puka_pai:
    Actually, our basement got flooded with the toolbox in it, we opened it and tools were nice and dry.

    ‘Get in touch with reality woman. Let me paint you a picture. You live somewhere along the Gulf Coast or Atlantic Seaboard. This includes all you New Yorkers and New Englanders too. On Monday you’re watching the local news and the Weather Man comes on a says that there is a “system” forming that we need to keep our eye on. You have heard this a million times before. So you make note of it and go about your business. You tune into the news the next night. It’s crossing the Carribean and doing damage to some third world tropical island. The “Cone of Confussion” in the US mainland ranges from Texas to the Florida Peninsula. Or maybe from Florida all the way up the Carolinas. All the people that live within 100 miles of the coast there are now put on warning. Ok, you take note of it and pray one of you fellow americans is the “lucky” one now. etc etc”

    Look if you live in an area BELOW water level you should do better then be ignorant to such warnings. When I lived in Europe, we knew better than to “hope for the best” we prepared.

    Everyone was saying that they “knew” the levvy’s were not up to par. if I even had an inkling to this I would not “just make a note of it”

  70. Musician78 says:

    It must be nice to have the money to be able to plan better.

  71. Sudonum says:

    @rockergal:
    Once again a link on the “waterproof” toolbox would be nice. Maybe even just a manufacturer? Was the tool box floating in you flooded basement?

    And I just love how you make generalizations and state them as facts. Such as, “Everyone knew the levvys were not up to par”. Well if “everyone” knew why wasn’t the damn ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS doing something about it before this whole bloody mess started? Where were the teams of inspectors? Why weren’t the insurance companies, who had written millions of dollars in policies, clamoring for the Corp to do something about the “Levvys that everyone knew were not up to par” before the storm hit? Was Congress investigating since MILLIONS of taxpayer dollars had been wasted on “levvys that everyone knew were not up to par”? If you knew that they “were not up to par” and witheld the information from the rest of the country, then perhaps these misguided residents led by lawyers lookling for a quick buck should be suing you instead of the Corp?

    Actually quite the reverse was true. In the few years that I lived in NOLA prior to Katrina EVERYONE touted that the levees around New Orleans could withstant anything up a Cat 3 and perhaps a Cat 4 depending on the direction it came from. That it would take over 15 feet of surge to top the levees. That the homes outside the levee system were doomed in the event of a major storm. But if you were inside, you were safe.

    Well guess what princess? The winds that hit New Orleans were Cat 3. The surge never topped the levees except for a brief time along the lakefront. Those levees never failed, and never let in a significant amount of water. In all but one case, the soil subsided below the levee. And in that case a large barge broke loose from its moorings and damaged the side of the levee causing it to collapse. It wasn’t until after the storm that a major survey was done to determine exactly why they failed.

    Yes there was the National Geographic article of a few years ago. And there was an “exercise” done by various state and local agencies that predicted some of the damages. But all of those scenarios were based on storm surge topping the levees. Not from poor construction, or barge accidents.

    As for your other generalization that touched a nerve; “When I lived in Europe, we knew better than to “hope for the best” we prepared.” How well did Europe prepare for the heat wave in the summer of 2003? Hell it lasted 3 weeks and 14,000 people died in France alone. I guess those 14,000 people had prepared because they HAD to know it was coming. They didn’t “hope for the best”. Why didn’t they all just head for cooler climates when it started getting hot? Maybe take a 3 week vacation in the Alps? Or just evacuate to Norway or Sweeden?

    Once again people, unless you went through it, don’t second guess the judgement of those who did. Many made wrong decisions and have lived to regret them. Many made wrong decisions and didn’t live at all. Most of us are just glad for the oppportunity to be putting our lives back together.

    Those of you who say people shouldn’t return tools that only have cosmetic damage have a very valid point. But did any of you ever put a “cheater” bar on a Craftsman wrench to get more leverage and snap it? Did you return it and get a new one? I cleaned my sockets and wrenches and still use them to this day. I also have other tools, including electric power tools that flooded and still work. Even if they hadn’t worked I would not have an issue with those manufacturers. They never said they had an unconditional guarantee.

  72. 23fengshui says:

    @cwm9: Intent is a factor in many laws, including criminal law (manslaughter vs. pre-meditated murder).

    Also, reasonability is a factor in most contract disputes. No reasonable company could possibly give out/honor an unconditional, unlimited warranty. Reasonability also plays a big role in defining “satisfaction.” It doesn’t matter what you think satisfaction means, it matters what a reasonable person/the public thinks it means.

  73. aedavidson says:

    I had an interesting encounter trying to get some craftsman tools warrantied today. I am a mechanic by trade so I really do not use a lot of craftsman tools, mostly snap-on and matco. I bought a new toolbox and in the process of moving tools from the old to the new I found about 7 pieces of broken craftsman tools. I went to a sears hardware today and was told that I could only exchange one piece per day? It is no surprise that I have not been in a sears in years and the store was almost empty. I just left them on the counter and told them that they could keep their junk.

  74. tntornadox says:

    ^ I work for Sears, and get the snap-on junkies in all the time.. they are always so committed to their snap-on tools… Don’t see why, if I was getting ripped off, I would be angry… over-priced junk..

  75. aedavidson says:

    ^ Overpriced I can agree with……….junk not so much. The issue I have is one piece per day? If you work for Sears is that a company policy? I worked for sears about 20 years ago and know that it was not back then.

  76. brian30bc says:

    Greetings from Key West. Sears is doing the same thing to us here. They are flatly refusing to honor the guarantee on any tools with rust on them. Meanwhile, the Snap-On supplier is more than happy to not only replace rusty Snap-On tools, but also, I have heard, craftsman tools for new Snap-On customers. I guess I’ll have to switch to Snap-On if this is true.

  77. jdi_90025 says:

    crankymediaguy keep harping on a “unconditional”, a word he has added to the warranty.

    The warranty does not state unconditional, and in fact, it contains two conditions. 1. they will only repair it, or 2. replace it. They are not required to replace it with a new tool and no time frame is specified. The people here wanting to return a tool due to rust are simply pitiful.

    For Sears to completely fulfill the warranty for the rust whiners, all they would have to do is clean the tool of rust and return the exact same tool back to you…something you could do yourself. If Sears did that, I’m sure we would have a whole new thread whining about that too.

    I make this pro sears post here, just the same as I leaving out the door to go to Sears to complain to them about the broken battery charger for my recently purchased new cordless drill.

    I will tactfully demand a working replacement for my charger, but I would be embarrassed to try to get a new tool simply due to rust.

  78. jmm says:

    “I believe this policy, while unconditional, it is not intended for someone to replace their entire collection whenever they feel like it. Sure, you ARE able to under their policy. But should you?”

    No Reverend Lovejoy, I shouldn’t. But if Sears doesn’t want me to, they should have written it into the warranty. Who cares what Sears intended. And who cares if somebody takes their whole collection in whenever they feel like it. Sears could (and should) just give them back the set they returned the time before (assuming not actually defective).
    ——
    “Rusty tools don’t work?”

    How about you find some rusty jack stands and start using those to hold your Eldorado up while you change the oil. Please report back with the results.
    ——
    “The lifetime warranty is meant to protect the customer in the event that a tool is defective or breaks under normal use. It is not meant to cover tools that are damaged/destroyed/lost due to fire, water, theft or other natural causes.”

    Who cares what it’s meant to do. Please point this information out in the warranty pasted at the end of this post. If Sears doesn’t want to cover rust, then put it in there. It’s called small print.
    ——
    “If your tools were damaged due to the flood, then you should have claimed it on your flood insurance.”

    How does having tools insured have anything to do with the Sears warranty? That was a rhetorical question if you are curious.
    ——
    “The warranty clearly is meant to cover tool defects and failure during normal use.”

    No, it isn’t clear. Clear would be if it said something like “this warranty covers defects and failure during normal use”.
    ——
    “This is especially true with the guy collecting rusted tools from garage sales in an attempt to scam Sears. That should be treated as criminal activity.”

    That’s really funny. If somebody has the time and the patience to rummage around garage sales all day and find a couple sockets, then go to Sears and exchange them, they are a loser. That’s the extent of it. No jail time.
    ——
    “The policy is set in mind for a small volume of returns.”

    What the hell does that mean? What is a small volume? Three? How you set something in someones mind is to spell it out in the warranty.
    ——
    “have a waterproof toolbox (thats what my husband has and we are not even in a flood zone)”

    I’m assuming this toolbox looks like some sort of small submarine?
    ——
    “Rust isn’t a defect….it’s physics.”

    Uh, ok. Throwing the ratchet off the bridge didn’t break it, gravity broke it. Do I understand correctly that if the issue has to do with physics, it shouldn’t be covered by the warranty?
    ——
    “I think we should use company policies for what they are for, using our sense to guide us.”

    Me, too. I think everybody should consider written contracts and agreements more like very loose and general guidelines, only to be followed if you feel like it. Now please put down the bong and get yourself together.
    ——
    “I have used several tools in my life and rust typically dosent affect they workings of the tool.”

    Several tools over the course of a lifetime isn’t exactly a good frame of reference. It’s dangerous and stupid to use rusty tools. I guess we will know more when the guy with the rusty jack stands reports back.
    ——
    “I’d actually side with Sears on this one…my interpretation of the warranty is satisfaction with the manner in which the tools perform their function…not warrantied against all events”

    Super. Go ahead and use that as your own personal addendum to the Sears written warranty. In the meantime, the rest of us will expect them to honor the warranty as written.
    ——
    It’s already been posted above, but I’m trying to see how long of a post this thing will let me make. So here again, pasted below, is the warranty from a set of sockets bought recently from Sears.

    As an aside, is this really a warranty just because it says so? It sounds like more of a guarantee. I think there is an unemployed judge with no pants somewhere out there that can answer this question.

    CRAFTSMAN HAND TOOL FULL WARRANTY

    If any Craftsman Hand Tool ever fails to give complete satisfaction, return it to any Sears store or other Craftsman Outlet in the United States for free repair or replacement. This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which vary from state to state.

    SEARS, ROEBUCK AND COMPANY, HOFFMAN ESTATES, IL 60179

    This fails to mention or even allude to issues such as: defects, workmanship, time limits, receipts, God, cosmetics/shininess, insurance policies, having a conscience, or anything being discretionary at the store level. And as odd as it may seem, it doesn’t call out anything about garage sales.

    If these sockets rust, I’m not going to be satisfied with them. When I take them back to Sears I’ll expect a repair job or replacement tool. If they say no, they are wrong and I am right. Too bad there’s nothing I can do about it but bitch.

  79. Anonymous says:

    I read that Sears policy after being refused a return. It is short and sweet and promises full satisfaction for any reasdon. That is why I have been buying Craftsman tools.

    Now the local Sears in Massachusetts has a hard-nose little clerk there (“Donald”) who says he will take back some of those I brought in but not the others because they don’t meet his personal standards for full satisfaction. I have a home workshop with literally thousands of Craftsman items (and also buy large appliances etc there). Sears considers me worthy of their new Sears Rewards card but the local clerk won’t let me bring in a wornout tool? I don’t think that is what corporate Sears had in mind with promoting their Craftsman Unlimited Warranty.

    It is definitely not what I had in mind when I shopped at Sears.