Walmart Confirms Slideshow, Positively Spins "Conscientious Objectors"

UPDATE: Walmart Wins Because We Fumbled
Walmart Sends Us DMCA Takedown Letter For Slideshow

The AP picked up the Walmart market research we posted on Tuesday.

They got confirmation about the slideshow, which said that Walmart’s defined 14% of “The Shopper Universe” as being “conscientious objectors.” Of this, Walmart spokesman David Tovar said,

…the research data was genuine but that “conscientious objector” meant consumers who base purchases on a company’s practices, such as charitable giving or environmental measures.

He said the term was not synonymous with Wal-Mart boycotters.

Really? So… “objectors”… that somehow means they’re still down with the big blue? Check your dictionary. “I object to your business practices, yet I’m irresistibly drawn your low prices.” Another PR mouthpiece spins like a dervish in his own filth.

Wal-Mart Releases More Internal Data [Forbes]
Wal-Mart: Few Shoppers Moved by Press [Forbes]

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  1. nweaver says:

    Actually, the PR dude may be right, and this is of people who actually will go INTO A WAL*MART.

    If you included ALL possible customers, the number of conciencous objectors would be vastly higher.

  2. Luxy says:

    There was a pretty good article in The Economist recently about Wal-Mart’s development issues. It mentioned that 93% of American households shop there at least once a year, which seems crazy to me. You can read the whole thing here: http://www.economist.com/business/displaystory.cfm?story_i

  3. mopar_man says:

    It mentioned that 93% of American households shop there at least once a year, which seems crazy to me.

    I hate to admit it since I dislike the place so much but I go into the place maybe 2 or 3 times a year to get the few things I absolutely can not buy anywhere else. Once it arrives in the mail, I’ll be proudly wearing my Hel-Mart.com shirt into the store every time I visit.

  4. KevinQ says:

    The PR guy might be technically correct. I fall into the “Conscientious Objector” category, but I wouldn’t call myself a boycotter of the company. I choose not to go there myself, but I don’t ask other people to not shop there.

    And like others said, I find myself in there about once a year, usually to get keys cut, since nowhere else around here seems to do it.

    K

  5. Beelzebub says:

    @mopar_man: I hate to admit it since I dislike the place so much but I go into the place maybe 2 or 3 times a year to get the few things I absolutely can not buy anywhere else. Once it arrives in the mail, I’ll be proudly wearing my Hel-Mart.com shirt into the store every time I visit.

    Really?

    What can you absolutely not buy anywhere else?

    I haven’t been in a Wal-Mart in 4 years.

  6. TPK says:

    “…consumers who base purchases on a company’s practices, such as charitable giving…”

    Is that PR-speak for Target?

  7. mopar_man says:

    I choose not to go there myself, but I don’t ask other people to not shop there.

    I do all the time.

    usually to get keys cut, since nowhere else around here seems to do it.

    That’s odd. There’s several hardware stores here that’ll do it, even one grocery store, with non-computerized machines.

    Really?

    What can you absolutely not buy anywhere else?

    Come to think of it, there’s one thing I can think of that I go there for now and it’s a type of salsa that my wife and I like. It’s a Wal-Mart brand and I haven’t seen anybody else that makes anything similar. I haven’t gone back for that in probably 6 months though. I used to go there for photo developing since they’re the only game in town but their automated digital print machines pissed me off to the point where I found somewhere online to get them done. I have to wait for prints to come in the mail but at least I don’t have to have my blood pressure skyrocket.

  8. Yossarian says:

    Big Blue = IBM, not Wal-Mart
    Wal-Mart = Evil Incarnate

    Also, Mopar: you can make your own salsa with a couple veggies, a food chopper and splash of white vinegar. Healthier, fresher, more delicious and it keeps you away from the hellmouth.

  9. mopar_man says:

    @Yossarian:

    Good point. I just got a food processor a couple months ago so maybe I should put it to use again.

  10. VA_White says:

    My husband and I are not co-located at the moment because of career commitments so we spend a lot of time burning up the interstate highway system trying to remember what the other really looks like. Even though I do not shop at Wal-Mart at home – ever – I will blushingly confess to stopping once or twice when I am driving with my boys to see my husband.

    The Wal-Marts in my urban area are unspeakably filthy and disgusting places to be but the small-town Wal-Marts seem to be sparkling and clean with bright aisles and friendly staff. I know when I am in Podunk, Texas that the local Wal-Mart will have goldfish crackers, baby wipes, and a new car adaptor for the DS Lite at dirt-cheap prices and be conveniently located right off the interstate.

    So even though I fall firmly into the conscientious objector category, I also fall into the 93% of American households who visit Wal-Mart at least once a year.

  11. Bob says:

    You’d think that Walmart would be more worried that they’re in the top 4 worst companies in the country, rather than some leaked Powerpoint presentation.

  12. Mike_ says:

    Last year, I needed some hydrogen peroxide for my cat (after her surgery), and also some other pet supplies, so I went to the pet store. They had everything I needed, except for the peroxide. Wal-Mart was right across the street. I could have avoided it by adding 20 minutes to my errand, but it was getting late and I was getting tired. This was many months ago, and I spent less than $1.00, but I still feel a little sick to my stomach when I think about it.

    I’ve been to Wal-Mart about 3 times in the past 5 years. Whenever I walk through the door, a chill runs down my spine, I become disoriented, and my ears start to ring. Every fiber of my being wants to get out of that horrible, horrible place as quickly as possible. I guess that makes me a conscientious objector.

  13. kerry says:

    @Mike_:

    Wal-Mart was right across the street. I could have avoided it by adding 20 minutes to my errand, but it was getting late and I was getting tired.

    I’ve fallen for that a couple times, then spent 10 minutes finding the thing I want and 25 minutes waiting in line to pay for it.

  14. coraspartan says:

    If by conscientious objector you mean a person who is disgusted by the filth, long lines and crappy merchandise, then I guess I am one. I was last in a WalMart in June of 2006. Hopefully that will be the last and final time I am EVER in a WalMart. Why shop at WalMart when God has answered my prayers with the mecca known as Target?

    Face it–WalMart is a shithole.

  15. kerry says:

    This just occurred to me: if they define the “conscientious objector” by how they choose where to shop, rather than where not to shop, shouldn’t they be called “conscientious shoppers” instead? Or would that make them sound too much like a good thing rather than a bad thing?

  16. Uurp says:

    I haven’t been in a Wal-Mart in a really long time. Used to work for them, too, at their home office. There’s a Target that’s closer so I go there. The Wal-Mart nearest us is dirty and kinda depressing.