Enviga Study In Obesity Bought And Paid For

Coke-Nestle paid for their own study on Enviga’s benefits to appear in the February issue of Obesity, as the codicil above, spotted by reader Karl, reveals.

Let’s see, “someone” paid for the study, funded by Nestle, to appear in Obesity (undoubtedly to legitimize their claims by having publication in a scientific journal). Awesome.

Looks like we have no clue what we’re talking about. Readers are chiming in to say paying for pages is pretty standard practice.

Castlecraver says:

Page charges are more the rule than the exception nowadays. You’ll find the same disclaimer under articles in most renowned medical and research journals. Although I disagree with the claims in the article, the disclaimer in no way indicates someone paid for it to be published in the way you’re implying….By submitting an article to a journal, you often have to agree to the charges pending acceptance of your manuscript.

Back a truckload of that into our mouth. If drinking a can of it as good as walking up a flight of stairs, as Coke’s director of nutrition and health policy contended, 18-wheels of it should be as good as running the Boston Marathon.

Snapple, owned by Nestle Cadbury Schweppes, is also rolling out a new green tea line touting their EGCG benefits. Interesting how this ad for it also focuses climbing up a flight of stairs. These guys are really hooked on the climbing stairs equals calories burning connection. — BEN POPKEN

Related: 18 USC Section 1734
Previously: Enviga posts.

Comments

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  1. castlecraver says:

    Page charges are more the rule than the exception nowadays. You’ll find the same disclaimer under articles in most renowned medical and research journals. Although I disagree with the claims in the article, the disclaimer in no way indicates someone paid for it to be published in the way you’re implying. Generally, these articles are submitted, sent out for peer review, revised, re-submitted, accepted, and only then are the proofs finalized and page charges collected. By submitting an article to a journal, you often have to agree to the charges pending acceptance of your manuscript.

    The short version: this in no way reflects any sort of shenanigans. Page charges and the resulting disclaimer are very common in scientific literature nowadays.

  2. statolith says:

    Seconding what castlecraver said. That disclaimer is pretty common in some highly-respected scientific journals, and it has nothing to do with being paid to publish in any under-handed way.

  3. delfuego says:

    Yeah, chalk this up to you guys not understanding what this means. Articles in the majority of the most highly-respected scientific journals are now supported by page charges paid for by the authors of the articles; I currently have an article in _Blood_, the journal of the American Society of Hematology, that carries that same exact message at the bottom, and I can tell you that there’s no financial benefit to anyone in the subject of my manuscript.

    I’m not one for scolding, but I’d ask that you guys clarify this — this is no different in my mind than any of the other fake hysteria generated when the press misunderstands the meaning of something and publicizes it as something it’s not. (Example: Pelosi plane-gate.)

  4. bndocksnt says:

    Here’s the code for those with google tunnel syndrome :

    Whoever, being an editor or publisher, prints in a publication
    entered as second class mail, editorial or other reading matter for
    which he has been paid or promised a valuable consideration,
    without plainly marking the same “advertisement” shall be fined
    under this title.

    EFFECTIVE DATE
    Section effective Sept. 1, 1960, see section 11 of Pub. L.
    86-682.

    Sounds like a pretty straightforward case of the editor/publisher covering the old ass.

  5. Panhandler says:

    I wonder if Robespierre ever thought, “Oops!” after a beheading. LOL!

  6. scottso says:

    Snapple is owned by Cadbury Schweppes, not Nestle.