IKEA Won't Sell "In-Stock" Mattress Because It Requires The Forklift?

Reader Gerald writes in after an odd experience with IKEA. He’s writing to ask if he has a legitimate complaint, or if he’s just being whiny. After calling to make sure that IKEA had the mattress he wanted in-stock, he rented a man with a van on craigslist for $30 and they went to go pick it up. Weirdly, IKEA refused to sell him the mattress because they have a policy against using their forklift during store hours.

I arrived at Ikea, and figured out the bin location of the mattress (king size mattresses are full serve, but queen are self serve). When I got to the bin location, it was empty. So I asked an employee to verify that they were in stock. She said they were, but if there were none on the shelf, they couldn’t sell one to me for safety concerns (apparently it would require a forklift to retrieve one). I would have to come back the next day, or right when they closed. I explained my non-truck-owning prediction, and was told I could pay $80 for home delivery. At this point, having a history of good customer service from Ikea, I was confused. Did they really not want my money?

Gerald called customer service, and spoke to a sympathetic CSR who offered him free home delivery to compensate him for his expense. Gerald accepted and was pleased, until IKEA called him back and told him they were rescinding the offer and he’d have to pay $80 to have the mattress delivered. Huh?

This morning, the call came, and I was told matter-of-factly there would be no free delivery, as it is Ikea’s policy to not use the forklift during business hours. I asked why I was told the mattresses were in stock if in reality they were not available for purchase. I swear this is what she said: that was the “risk” I took. I also inquired why the first person I called led me to believe that free delivery would not be a problem; she had “no idea” why I was told that. So I asked for her manager, was given a number, left a message, and have heard nothing since, and am not expecting to hear anything further.

So you make the call. Am I whining? I kinda feel like I’m whining. But if I’m not, how do I balance the need for a quality, affordable mattress with boycotting Ikea, the only place with quality, affordable mattresses?

What do you guys think? Is Gerald whining? Does IKEA have a responsibility to deliver a mattress for no charge? We think that once a company offers something, they really shouldn’t take it back.—MEGHANN MARCO

Gerald writes:

Dear Consumerist,

Please help me out. I need to know if I have a legitimate reason to be angry, or if I’m just being whiny.

I woke up on Sunday morning determined to buy the $400 queen size Sultan Hassleback mattress from Ikea. I don’t make a lot of money, so this was a big deal to me.

First I called Ikea, and made sure they were in stock. I was told yes, in fact they had 25 in stock. Rad. Since I have no truck on my own, I put up a Craigslist ad offering $30 for someone with a truck to help me out. Within an hour, I had a response, and was set to go. I arrived at Ikea, and figured out the bin location of the mattress (king size mattresses are full serve, but queen are self serve). When I got to the bin location, it was empty. So I asked an employee to verify that they were in stock. She said they were, but if there were none on the shelf, they couldn’t sell one to me for safety concerns (apparently it would require a forklift to retrieve one). I would have to come back the next day, or right when they closed. I explained my non-truck-owning predictiment, and was told I could pay $80 for home delivery. At this point, having a history of good customer service from Ikea, I was confused. Did they really not want my money?

I asked for a customer service number, and was given the number to a call center in Baltimore. The girl there seemed to be understanding, and explained that it would only be fair to get me free home delivery for my troubles. That sounded absolutely reasonable to me. So I was given a reference number and told to expect a call within 24-48 hours.

This morning, the call came, and I was told matter-of-factly there would be no free delivery, as it is Ikea’s policy to not use the forklift during business hours. I asked why I was told the mattresses were in stock if in reality they were not available for purchase. I swear this is what she said: that was the “risk” I took. I also inquired why the first person I called led me to believe that free delivery would not be a problem; she had “no idea” why I was told that. So I asked for her manager, was given a number, left a message, and have heard nothing since, and am not expecting to hear anything further.

So you make the call. Am I whining? I kinda feel like I’m whining. But if I’m not, how do I balance the need for a quality, affordable mattress with boycotting Ikea, the only place with quality, affordable mattresses?

[Photo: John Pastor]

Comments

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  1. Hmmmm…not whining in my book. He did everything he was supposed to, called first, was told they were in stock (in stock means you can buy it, right??), showed up, and Ikea dropped the ball. Upon contacting Ikea, he must have been professional (if they offered him free delivery the first time, he wasn’t being rude).

    IMHO Ikea def. owes him free home delivery.


    On another note, go to Sams club or Costco and get a bed. I bought one there a few years ago at a good price and it was a great bed (name brand too, don’t remember which one though)…and they have no problem with forklifts…

  2. corporatedrone says:

    I really don’t think Gerald is whining (at least not unfairly)… If that’s Ikea’s policy, then it’s their policy, but when he called to check if it was in stock, I would think that reasonably means, there are 25 that are able to be purchased – NOT there are a few that you can purchase and the rest are available for home delivery. Something should have been said to that affect when he called. And as Meghann said, once they offered the free delivery, it’s in VERY bad taste to turn around and take it back.

  3. healthdog says:

    Not whining. They offered free home delivery, and definitely should not have rescinded.

    How do you jeer in Swedish?

  4. TedSez says:

    So if you call IKEA and determine that something is in stock, you’re still “risking” the possibility that you won’t be able to buy it? Way to keep customers coming back, guys!

    What’s more, I don’t think there’s anything worse, customer-service-wise, than having someone say they’ll solve your problem, then having someone else say “On second thought, that’s not going to happen, even though a representative of this company said it would.” I think that would cause most people to avoid that business in the future whenever possible. (I’m talking to you, United Airlines!)

  5. djwoodyphl says:

    As a former owner of that mattress, I can tell you that your money will be better spent elsewhere. It felt good for about the first week, and after that everything was downhill. I ended up replacing it within a year. I’d agree with 12 inch in that Costco always has super-fab deals on beds, and if you don’t have a membership, maybe you can rent a man with a Costco membership AND van on Craigslist next time.

  6. how do you jeer in Swedish?

    BOOOOO-RK!BOOOO-RK!BOOOO-RK!

  7. AlteredBeast (blaming the OP one article at a time.) says:

    I worked for a few years at Ikea (in the beds dept), and this is common.

    The system displays the number of units on hand. That could also include 1 or 2 display units if the paper work wasn’t done properly.

    As far as this issue, yes, it is company policy not to run the forklift in the self serve area when the store is open. Many big box places have this policy, such as Costco. It makes sense, as I’ve seen employees get injured during routine forklift usage.

    The self serve area (where it sounds like this matress was located) is first come first serve. For instance, if you ask for the location of a table, and it says there are 3 left when you are shopping in the department, you could get down there and have none available. This is due to someone picking up those 3 and not going to the register yet….or them being in overstock.

    The fact that the matress wasn’t accessable should have been conveyed to the customer, but often is not. So yes, Ikea should have informed him that the matress may not be accessable, but this is a common thing, not a fluke. Free shipping should have been given to the customer, as that is what my department had done time to time.

    That is my 2 cents.

  8. AlteredBeast (blaming the OP one article at a time.) says:

    Edit:

    The fact that the matress may not be accessable should have been conveyed to the customer, but often is not.

  9. AlteredBeast (blaming the OP one article at a time.) says:

    BTW, I own the top of the line foam mattress from Ikea…and I love it!

  10. DeeJayQueue says:

    Not Whining.

    Although I will play the devil’s advocate here and say that it’s somewhat of a catch 22 situation.

    Ikea doesn’t have any way of knowing what product is sitting down where people can buy it and what is up in the rafters where you have to get the Big Boy to get it down. Their inventory system (like just about everyone else except Target’s) is based on scanned receiving. They scan the merch as it comes in the door, it gets added to the inventory and dispersed inside the store. The number that the computer displays when they do a check is the total number in the store, not the number within reach.
    Sounds like what happened is that they either had a run on those matresses or someone wasn’t doing their job in restocking them, they ran out and were following policy by not using the forklift on the salesfloor.

    They Fucked up when they rescinded the offer for free shipping. I’d call the store directly, or pay a visit in person and ask for the manager. Usually these places are so busy that the manager will do whatever it takes to get you out of the store, which can include eating the cost of home delivery for the mistake. Just be sure to arrange for everything right then and there, fill out the necessary shipping paperwork in the manager’s presence and have him sign off on it.

  11. BillyShears says:

    I hope they called for their $80 after the mattress was delivered, because I’d love to see them try and take it back.

  12. ABBailey1981 says:

    I worked for IKEA for a long period of time. Sadly the policy on the books is that, “No fork lift or other floor pallet jacks can be present on the sales floor during business hours.”

    Now knowing that the person Gerald called should have checked placement of the stock items. The program utilized to determine stock lists number in the self serve BIN and the number in the RISER/Shelf or Hold. It comes down on that note to the first person he talked to not clearly declaring what the “stock” was.

    But I can tell you, if you find the Area Manager for the Warehouse and you calmly but with enough authority in your voice they will close a whole section of the warehouse to bring out the forklift and get you what you need. I saw it many times, and as a Designer for them sometimes we would have to get items in the RISER during business hours and that’s what we would have them do.

    So word of warning is to ask IKEA when they tell you how much they have in stock to check what’s in the Self Serve BIN (which is only an approximation because if another customer has it in their cart and hasn’t checked out yet the number hasn’t lowered), so you don’t run there when nothing is really there.

    With IKEA the best practice on large items or high volume items is to call the day before and check stock and when the next shipment is coming in, and then call 30 mins before you head out to check it again. The number one thing is be prepared and to understand IKEA just does it their own way and you have to work it just right.

  13. VA_White says:

    He is not whining. The closest IKEA to me is almost two hours’ drive from my house so if there is something I can’t order online, I *always* call the store to see if they have it before driving all the way to the city.

    If I called ahead and the mattress was there but they wouldn’t get it for me, I would be seriously torqued off.

  14. guroth says:

    Between being told it was “in stock” (which should be synonymous with “yes you can come buy it right now”) and then especially when later being told he would get free delivery I think IKEA should at the very least cut him a deal on delivery like half price, and maybe even for free.

    Employees from IKEA cost this man time and money.

  15. jeblis says:

    Most of the ikea stuff is crap anyway.


    You’ve done the right thing, complain and made it public. Now just take your business elsewhere.

  16. juri squared says:

    They should definitely eat the cost of delivery, in my opinion. The staff on the phone screwed up by not telling him that “in stock” doesn’t necessarily mean “available.” Then the CSR screwed up by telling him they’d deliver it for free when they apparently wouldn’t. Finally, the third CSR screwed up by rescinding that offer instead of just eating the cost in the interest of customer service.

    In my past retail experience, I’ve screwed up on pricing once or twice (it happens). The policy has always been to let the customer take advantage of my mistake, and I would get chewed out for it later. This is, of course, within reason – no $250 items for $10, or whatnot – but I think free delivery is WELL within reason here.

  17. RokMartian says:

    This has happened to me the past 4 times I went to the Ikea here in Atlanta. ABBaily is correct – the last time we called right when the store opened and have them hold it for us at the desk before we left the house.

  18. SOhp101 says:

    If you’re going to spend $400 on a mattress, go get it at Costco or Sam’s Club. Way better value for the money. Every friend I know that has purchased an Ikea mattress has purchased another mattress elsewhere within 2 years.

  19. ABBailey1981 says:

    SOhp101 is correct. Sadly the quaality of the mattresses like everything else at IKEA is not very lasting. Even with the warrenties IKEA puts on them they still don’t do the job “with in specs.” Better to save the money and spend it on quality and fine American workmanship. Oh and don’t be fooled by the “25 Year Warrenty” proved by IKEA on the Mattresses. Read the terms and conditions very closely. As IKEA don’t really provide them on much of anything else other then a couple pots and pans and some of the high end items. So claims are hard to process. Again if you can go else where.

  20. Fuzzy_duffel_bag says:

    I had the opposite experience. We checked online, and it said the IKEA didn’t have the mattress we were looking for. We went anyway (had other things to get) and asked the mattress person if we could order it since they didn’t have them in stock, and he was incredibly rude, pounded on his computer, said “it’s in self-serve” and threw a piece of paper with the location on it at us.

    Then we got to self-serve, and it wasn’t there. Luckily, we found the only happy and friendly IKEA staff member I have ever encountered, who found where it was and got the forklift to get it down.

    So, in my experience, they will forklift it for you.

    I filled out a comment card about the asshole guy, if only to feel better about it.

  21. KevinQ says:

    I used to work for a video store, and it was common for people to call in and see if something is in stock. Knowing peoples’ propensity for picking up a movie, and then dropping it randomly when they decide not to rent it, it was our store’s policy, as long as we weren’t incredibly busy, to at least check on the shelf to make sure the movie was there.

    The only time we didn’t do this was when the computer said we had a few. Chances were, at least one of them was in the right place.

    We did this because we knew and understood the limits of the system. Likewise, IKEA should be aware of the limits of a system that lists things as being in-stock even if they are unavailable for sale, and the employees should visually check stock before telling the customer they have some, even if they have to put the customer on hold for a moment.

    I understand the reasons for not running the forklift while the store’s open, but they need to work harder to get around that problem.

    K

  22. edwardoneill says:

    This is whining.

    How much experience with Ikea does it take to know that when they run out of things you can reach, they have to take them down from way yup above, and that clearly takes a forklift.

    No reasonable person would say, ‘Why don’t you bring the big-ass forklift over here during business hours with customers running about and get my item?’

    ‘In stock’ can perfectly well mean ‘in the store’ but not ‘in reach.’ I have no problem with that.

    Don’t rent a van and show up to Ikea and expect everything to be just as you want.

    As for the free shipping, that was clearly too good to be true. Do you think they could promise that to everyone whose item wasn’t accessible? Get real.

  23. nick says:

    That does suck that they rescinded the free shipping offer. In my experience, IKEA has usually been much more friendly.

    Besides that, however, the rest is all to be expected.

    Anyone who regularly shops at IKEA knows that just because an item is “in stock” on the computer, it doesn’t guarantee it’s still going to be there in the appropriate bin downstairs.

    If you’re going to hire someone to pick-up your purchase, it’s probably a best practice to schedule it before you go, but not to actually have the person drive over until you have purchased the item(s).

    Personally, I’ve always gone with home delivery, because its quick, simple and painless. I’m not sure why it cost $80 to deliver his mattress, because I bought one a few months ago, and it was only $49 for next-day delivery, on the weekend.

    I agree with DeeJayQueue; go to the store, find the manager down where you would pick up the mattress, and explain the situation. If you’re persistent enough you should hopefully be able to get your free (or at least discounted) shipping.

    Good luck!

  24. matt1978 says:

    edwardoneill, you are a jerk.

    how would any reasonable person – not you, mr. shopping genius, know that a store that says they have something in stock know that they will not get the item for you? We all don’t have the Ikea handbook memorized.

    Sam’s, Costco, Best Buy, Target, Wal-Mart, Home Depot, Lowe’s, any decent big box store will get a cherry-picker, pallet-lifter, forklift, or whatever it takes to sell you an item.

    i hope your days are filled with denied rebates and unhonored warranties.

  25. sr105 says:

    Send IKEA a small claims court demand for your costs. This seems to be a case of fraud (deceptive false advertising). They advertised over the phone that the product was in stock. Your visit to the store is worth money to IKEA(businesses calculate advertising costs on such things as the cost to acquire a new customer or to get them to the store). Even though the sales associate wasn’t deliberately trying to mislead you, it’s still deceptive fraud.

    Anyway, that’s all too complicated. Just send them a small claims demand letter and then pay your $35 (or so plus the service fee) and IKEA is more than likely to pay up. Small claims court is not about law. It’s about the perception of right and wrong. You’re more than likely to win as long as you’re respectful and polite.

    I’m not a lawyer, but I have used small claims court with success. It’s very easy to do.

    On a side note:

    Regarding IKEA not knowing the difference between in-stock and accessible, the inaccessible merchandise is *not* in-stock if it cannot be retrieved during business hours. The vertical storage is no different than if that merchandise were in an off-site warehouse. This is like your local bookstore claiming a book is in stock because there’s one at their distribution center.

    Good luck.

  26. orielbean says:

    Edward, you are the one being unreasonable. I know that my Lowe’s and HD have NO PROBLEM running a forklift at any time during store hours.

    They get stuff for me. They have little beeping warners and bored staff members waving orange flags around. Why not IKEA? Their self-serve area looks perfect for a little midday forklift action. It looks like a HD or Costco or BJ’s or Lowe’s store where the floor is routinely accessed by a lift.

    And if you ever read any of the comments here, we all know that CSR’s sometimes have the power to grant you free things that usually cost money when you call to complain. Starbucks will give you a free drink if they piss you off or screw up the order.

    How is that whining? He went out of his way to get a delivery person, then that craigslist person showed up and they both wasted the day due to a policy that might not have had any impact at all on them. I would go to the store and complain to a manager directly to solve the issue and save time vs calling a complaint line memory hole.

  27. aka Cat says:

    They may have sold the last on-floor mattress between the time Gerald called, and got to the store. It happens.

    But they shouldn’t offer free delivery and rescind it.

    Make sure you don’t have any place locally that makes mattresses. Around here we have “The Original Mattress Factory”; their mattresses are excellent and relatively inexpensive.

  28. If you already paid and they agreed to a specific day of delivery/pick-up, call Ikea’s management and tell them you’re seeking substantial performance on the contract from another supplier. Ikea has to pay the other supplier.

    My brother got a $1200 mattress set for $250 with free delivery this way — company failed to deliver, he told them he was seeking specific performance, they kept saying “You can’t do that!” and he kept saying “OH YES I CAN!” because he’d just taken the bar. In desperation they marked it down to $250 and delivered it free to prevent him from making them pay someone else. Apparently they could explain to corporate why they sold a $1200 mattress set for $250 but not why they had to pay another company $1200 for a mattress set.

  29. ExVee says:

    Whether a store will run a forklift or other kinds of equipment on the salesfloor (in a warehouse-type store, we’ll define as being the areas open to the public) within a certain range of hours is really just dependant on the company, and to some degree, each individual store. The basis for the decision can be any number of things, but I figure it comes down to the company’s insurance, and to a lesser degree their belief in their workers to follow proper safety procedures and how much they care about what happens to shoppers. Wal-Mart’s policy on equipment seems to disallow use of anything on the salesfloor during normal operating hours except for a scissor-lift stock-picker. At the 24 hour stores, we’re not even technically supposed to use the unpowered pallet jacks on the salesfloor between 6am and 9pm. My store at least gives us a little leeway there and doesn’t really say anything to us as long as we don’t keep them on the floor any longer than is absolutely necessary. But, use of the power-jack or other forklift-type units is totally forbidden at any time the store is open, not just between certain hours. This even goes so far that if we have to move a power jack from one backroom to the other for some reason, we have to walk it outside the store. It’s a legitimate safety issue, and I think Ikea is right to have that policy.

    That does not however mean I endorse all the actions that occured. Yes, the person on the phone should have made it clear that there was the possibility the item would not be available until the very end of the day or even the next day. That was the first mistake made. The second may have been the offer of free delivery. The customer service person was right – if it’s policy not to use the forklift during business hours, then compensation for this policy is probably not warranted. But if the first person did not represent this information, there’s a ground here. But I think it’s the responsibility of that particular location’s manager to correct that failure. That might make the second mistake both Ikea’s and Gerald’s. He should have pushed on the store level, not the corporate level. The store manager should be within his rights to arrange delivery at the cost of the store, and not take the matter any higher than that where it could be rescinded.

    Finally, that’s the third mistake. Yeah, someone in customer service made an error in offering free delivery, but that’s not a problem you pass along to your customer. That’s a problem you keep with that CSR and maybe do some retraining or whatever. But at that point the worst thing to do is take it back. You eat it and move on.


    Gerald isn’t being whiny at all. This is a major series of errors which could have easily been avoided altogether if the store employee had only indicated the matress wouldn’t be available to buy until at least the end of business hours. At this point I’d hold on to that above all, and let the issue with the customer service arm drop. Get with the store’s manager about this to get it made right. He or she is the one with the most immediate ability to fix a problem in the store.

  30. Crim Law Geek says:

    Eyebrows:
    It may vary by jurisdiction, but most courts won’t order specific performance on a non-unique item (i.e. anything but land) or services (i.e. construction). A mattress is not a unique item (unless it’s some bizzaro one-of-a-kind antique mattress). A court would have almost certainly just ordered the non-performer to pay the money back, possibly with the inclusion of incidental costs (i.e. the cost of having stayed home waiting for the delivery) or the difference between what your brother paid the non-performer and what it ended up costing him to get what he wanted from someone else.

    Courts are loathe to order specific performance because it is a pain in the ass for the court to oversee. For example, if they order a contractor to fix your roof as promised, it will just end up with you bitching to the court because the contractor is not using the promised shade of tile, or is doing a bad job because they’re pissed you took them to court. It is far easier for the court to just order the tort-pheasor [sic] to pay.

  31. infinitysnake says:

    Not whiny.

    I had the exact same thing done to me over a kids’ mattress they told me was in stiock, and I drove 45 miles for nothing.

    Rescinding the delivery offer is low class.

  32. Owen Meaney says:

    Borderline whining, but justified. The fact that the offer was made and rescinded was what really bothered me. Those complaint people are generally well trained, I have never heard of them overturning an offer to make right. Especially IKEA over a measly $80, and if they make the free delivery at their convience it will probably not cost them anything.

  33. Katharine says:

    I don’t think it is whining and I was going to go to Ikea this weekend and now I am reconsidering. People who are honest and trustworthy deserve my money.

  34. dotyoureyes says:

    Not whining. “In-stock” should mean “you can buy it now.” Something that’s not available for purchase at that moment is certainly not “in-stock.”

    They misrepresented their stock-on-hand on the phone and did nothing to remedy the situation for the customer.

  35. Amy Alkon says:

    If Ikea has little gotchas, it’s their responsibility to inform the consumer.

    They owe him free delivery, plus a pillow or two and a jar of lingonberries to say “Sorry for the aggravation.”

  36. Squishy says:

    PLEASE …
    There is NO reason on God’s green Earth not to give the customer any item that is actually in stock. The company is in business to sell product. They have a customer who wants product. Product is at the store. Only a completely moronic dysfunctional system does not connect the customer with the product. That is the SOLE purpose of the store. IKEA needs a reality check.

    You’re not whining but you’re an idiot if you give IKEA your money now.

  37. Her Grace says:

    If for nothing else than that they offered free shipping and then did a take-back on it, he deserves free shipping to his door.

  38. North of 49 says:

    The ikea website has a way to check stock of certain stores online. That’s what we do before we head out to them.

  39. skeleem_skalarm says:

    Definitely not whining. People need to know these companies’ policies, and they need to have the courage to just walk away, even if it hurts.

  40. tz says:

    I could understand if magically three people came earlier and bought up all the mattresses first, or some other unusual event, but the rest sounds like a scam:

    Call, they say it is in stock. But you can’t take it home with you, but they can deliver it to you for a fee – sometime after the store closes the forklift gnomes come and move the items onto the delivery trucks, they have no control over them.

    If their policy is to sell something “in stock” only if they can tack on a huge delivery fee, something is wrong. Or they should say you can’t pick it up at the store.

    It is like insurance or those other expensive but very profitable add-ons they insist on when buying or renting a car. Ikea seems to have found a way of forcing you to pay for their delivery service.

  41. snakeuvs says:

    This isn’t even a close call. I can’t believe people are being asked to opine on whether this is anti-consumer behavior by Ikea or not.

    This guy did everything he was supposed to do and Ikea screwed him.

  42. Charmander says:

    “The ikea website has a way to check stock of certain stores online. That’s what we do before we head out to them.”


    And he called and verified they were in stock. But, as we have just learned here, “in stock” does not mean “accessible.”

    Not whining. He should get delivery FREE.

  43. FLConsumer says:

    Employees getting injured by forklifts? While entirely possible, what the hell were they doing? One of my clients is an entertainment venue which does ~100 changeovers a year. No forklift injuries thus far since the building opened. Our forklift “drivers” aren’t trained, no certification, just common sense. I’ll admit to flooring the pedal myself when stuff needs to get done and time’s running out.

  44. ngngng says:

    Just a few points on this issue –

    1. I work at IKEA – and yes, it does happen that products are not available for pick up sometimes but are in stock. The call centre employee was clearly not careful in looking at the stock situation because there are several fields stating what was available before opening, how many are expected to sell during the day, how many are in overstock, how many were already sold etc…. so basically the overstock quantity should have been deducted from what was “available.”

    2. No, it is not possible to get the forklifts out in the warehouse during open hours because it requires large parts of it to be closed off for customers for some time, resulting in lost sales during busy times. Yes, I know this sounds like bad customer service from one perspective – but it is an issue of serving one vs. several customers – and it was offered to have the mattress brought down right when the store closed.

    3. On the delivery issue – since it was promised free at first,(and only because it was promised mistakingly) it should not have been revoked, even though it is against procedures. But, since procedures weren’t followed from the beginning with the first call centre agent, that shouldn’t matter. However, the problem should not be taken up with the head office, but with the store itself, because the sales managers do remedy the issue if it is explained.

  45. tzeltal says:

    All this because one person made a mistake at the very beginning.

    Like some people have stated, it is more than normal to avoid using the forklift while customers are around. Think of the responsibility! (yes, you might not want to run in front of one while its at work, but some other people do it!)

    The first person contacted over the phone had enough information to tell the customer that there was a big chance that the mattress was not going to be there. When I see we have 30 on stock, two available (thus 28 would need the forklift) and someone calls to see if we have them available, I clearly state there’s a big chance they will not find it, and they should wait ’till the next day.

    Shouldn’t the self serve area be refilled each time a product is missing? Sure, but it doesn’t happen that way in reality just like my local Kroger’s never has 2% milk when I go and get it.

    I agree with NGNGNG as far as the free delivery goes. Such a shame things like these happen, but they happen EVERYWHERE.