Everything You Wanted To Know About Canceling Verizon But Were Afraid To Ask

Hey there. It’s us, your friendly Consumer blog. We know you’d like to cancel your Verizon contract, but it can be a little intimidating… particularly because Verizon doesn’t want to honor the terms of your contract, and you may be afraid of them. That’s sad, but it doesn’t have to be this way. Come with us now as we take a journey to month-to-month bliss. Remember, a contract goes two-ways, regardless of what some companies may think.

Step 1) Understand your rights. Verizon has changed their rates, and were obligated to issue a “Legal Notice.” In their contract it says “IF THE CHANGES HAVE A MATERIAL ADVERSE EFFECT ON YOU, HOWEVER, YOU CAN END THE AFFECTED SERVICE, WITHOUT ANY EARLY TERMINATION FEE, JUST BY CALLING US WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER WE SEND NOTICE OF THE CHANGE.” This is what you will be doing.

Step 2) If you have a text messaging plan, click here. If you do not, click here. Verizon customers with messaging plans will need to cite the “International Receiving Rate” as their reason for canceling. Other customers can refer to the entire rate hike.

Step 3)
Research other cell phone companies. Make sure you want to do this.

Step 4) Call Verizon at 800) 922-0204. Calmly, but firmly, state that you wish to cancel due to the text messaging increase. Tell them you received a legal notice about the rate change that instructed you to consult your Customer Agreement. Then, read them this section of the Customer Agreement:

    Our Rights To Make Changes
    Your service is subject to our business policies, practices, and procedures, which we can change without notice. UNLESS OTHERWISE PROHIBITED BY LAW, WE CAN ALSO CHANGE PRICES AND ANY OTHER CONDITIONS IN THIS AGREEMENT AT ANY TIME BY SENDING YOU WRITTEN NOTICE PRIOR TO THE BILLING PERIOD IN WHICH THE CHANGES WOULD GO INTO EFFECT. IF YOU CHOOSE TO USE YOUR SERVICE AFTER THAT POINT, YOU’RE ACCEPTING THE CHANGES. IF THE CHANGES HAVE A MATERIAL ADVERSE EFFECT ON YOU, HOWEVER, YOU CAN END THE AFFECTED SERVICE, WITHOUT ANY EARLY TERMINATION FEE, JUST BY CALLING US WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER WE SEND NOTICE OF THE CHANGE.

You may need to escalate to a supervisor. Do not give up. Verizon is letting people cancel.

Step 5) Port your number. Tell the CSR that you want a ported number, then follow the instructions in this post.

Good luck! Let us know how it goes. Stay strong, my Consumerists.—MEGHANN MARCO

UPDATE: John writes:

    Make that one less Verizon customer. Talked to them 5 minutes. I was nothing but pleasant but to the point. I even went as far as to say that I did in fact enjoy Verizon’s service, but was being offered a better deal, and merely wished to exercise my legal right under their contract. She was a little condescending (“but you don’t even receive text messages from puerto rico!”), but all-in-all, all I can say is “Sa-weet!” Now I’ll be going to my sister’s cell phone store to get hooked up on a good package with a sweet phone (Word to the wise, Treo 700w? Not all it’s cracked up to be.)

PREVIOUSLY: Break Your Verizon Contract Without Fee, Thanks to TXT Msg Raise
Cancel Verizon Without A Fee Even If You Have A Txt Msg Plan
Verizon Makes Canceling Over Their Txt Msg Hike Impossible
Verizon: 34 Txt Msgs= Material Adverse Effect

Comments

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  1. Jimmy M says:

    I was still under the impression when you use these methods to ‘cancel’ porting your number was not an option. You’re saying that you can cancel the ‘contract’ portion and keep the service – thereby allowing a port with no ETF?

  2. I spoke to the Verizon Wireless press guy, Jeffery Nelson, and he told me that not all customer sevice reps are aware of the rate change, which is probably part of the problem. They don’t even have a canned response in place, so it’s up to the individual reps to flail around without information. Fun! However, this may work to your advantage since no one has told the reps to all say no one can cancel because of this.

  3. Treved says:

    Can someone clearly and definitively answer this question for me please:

    If I cancel my contract due to the change, can I stay on the same VERIZON plan as a month-to-month customer? Or do I have to leave Verizon entirely?

    Thanks!

  4. danger says:

    Jeff – have you asked Verizon?

  5. Treved says:

    Just the hassle of sitting on hold waiting for those clowns gives me the shivers. Plus, from what I’m reading here it seems like they will lie and say anything to you in order to keep you stuck in your contract.

    So no, I did not, but I figured I’d ask here first since they’ve compiled “everything” I need to know about canceling my account.

    Thanks for the great advice though danger, appreciate it.

  6. Meg Marco says:

    Jeff,
    I believe that since you are calling to “END THE AFFECTED SERVICE, WITHOUT ANY EARLY TERMINATION FEE,” your service will be terminated. I’d ask Verizon about it. Emailing tips@consumerist.com is the best way to ask questions. We’ll try our best to figure things out for you.

  7. Treved says:

    Thanks Meghan.

  8. eiberri says:

    Jeff, if you do find out, could you post your findings? I’d love to get out of my contract but I’m not sure I’m completely ready to abandon VZW just yet.

  9. SexCpotatoes says:

    ha, with the “we” in meghan’s post… I thought she was Ben! But wait, the whole “we” thing and “our girlfriend”… does that mean you share your girlfriend with meghan? Inquiring minds want to know.

  10. GT4NE1 says:

    Worked great for me. I waited a couple weeks to try on purpose though, to let the best method surface on interweb.

    I was on hold for less than 30 seconds and talked to one CSR who asked if I had considered a text message plan. I politely declined and he transfered me to Josh who canceled my plan without any resistance. Josh asked if there was anyway Verizon could keep me as a customer and I told them they already had when I chose them as my work phone provider. He thanked me and gave me his extension if I had any problems.

    He also said the fee would appear on my last statement along with a credit for the same amount.

  11. michaelw436 says:

    I successfully got out of my Verizon contract last night! What is interesting about this is that I actually had text messaging DISABLED for the past year at least. My wife was getting messages from people she didn’t know, and we didn’t use it anyways. We have NEVER used the text messaging, and still got out! I followed the instructions above, then the rep asked me to hold for a minute. After a minute, she got back on the phone, and told me that the rate increase didn’t affect me. I explained to her about why we disabled it, she tried to upsell my contract to a messaging package, and then she cancelled our contract immediately with NO OTHER QUESTIONS ASKED.

  12. Penguin66 says:

    Should we cancel the Verizon contract before we port the number or do we contact the new carrier first to let them know what are plans are?

  13. michaelw436 says:

    By the way, after telling me that I didn’t have any early termination fees, they still billed me the fees. I called them last night, and had to be VERY persistent (repeated myself and the contract at least 10 times) They finally gave in… again… and credited my account. This was after they tried to convince me that they would research it for 7-10 business days. FYI, they were trying to twist my words by saying I only had 15 days, in relation to the beginning of my contract, but I had to convince the rep that I wasn’t talking about that, I was talking about what was on our signed contract… over and over and over again. So even if they tell you that there won’t be an early termination fee, they are still trying to stick it to you. This is a pretty dirty practice to lie to your customers. Get names, extensions, date and times of calls, and be very persistent.

  14. jchar3 says:

    The thing about being a consumer in America is you get what you pay for….if you think Verizon is so bad go to Sprint and drop every call you make, or switch to Cingular and not have service at your house…the great thing about America is freedom of choice…so go to Sprint you’ll be back in a few months…Instead of trying to weasle out of your contract remember that Video camera phone you have costs Verizon 599.99 and you paid 79.99…I’ve worked for all the carriers and Verizon is by far the best…quit whining and enjoy America’s most reliable network ;-)

  15. baddog65 says:

    Hilarious! If you think Verizon actually paid $599.99 for a camera phone, you are sadly mistaken.If you think Verizon Wireless is America’s most reliable network, you are sadly mistaken again! Every carrier has their pros and cons, it mostly depends on where you live or travel. Do your homework and choose the carrier that meets you specific needs, then quit whining! and by the way, can anyone explain the miscelaneous charge on your Verizon Wireless bill? no one can! we are anot talking about taxes and surcharges, they all charge that. Take that miscelaneous fee and times it by the number of subscribers and see how badly you are getting ripped off.

  16. G says:

    To answer the question about keeping the service month to month but canceling the contract. I terminated my contract with T-mobile after a text message increase and they would not let me keep the service. I called several times before I actually canceled to make sure it wasn’t a ill-informed rep. I finally talked to a supervisor in the cancellation department to confirmed what the previous reps had told me, service must be terminated when the contract it canceled. I too would like to know how to go about porting your number if you plan on canceling your current contract in this manner.

  17. G says:

    @jchar3:
    off topic and irrelevant

  18. govtrust says:

    Is this post still valid?
    Doesn’t this offer expire after a certain amount of time?
    Anyone canceled their service recently?

  19. xayoz306 says:

    Was just poking around and found these articles about how to get out of your Verizon (or any other carrier’s) contract due to a fee increase. The part of the contract that everyone seems to be quoting states that the contract allows for a 60 day window to opt out without incurring an Early Termination Fee. The sentence before it, however, is the legal hook that would most likely stand up in court: IF YOU CHOOSE TO USE YOUR SERVICE AFTER THAT POINT, YOU’RE ACCEPTING THE CHANGES. This would imply the service asa whole, not the particular service being increased. Essentially, you would have to not use your cellular phone from the time the increase is announced, until the time you wish to cancel.