Wii Wrist Straps: Let the Lawsuits Begin

Law firm Green Welling LLP has filed the inevitable Wii wrist strap class action lawsuit, wherein they claim, ” Nintendo’s failure to include a remote that is free from defects is in breach of Nintendo’s own product warranty.” What’s the point of suing Nintendo?

“The class action lawsuit seeks to enjoin Nintendo from continuing its unfair or deceptive business practices as it relates to the Nintendo Wii.The lawsuit also seeks an injunction that requires Nintendo to correct the defect in the Wii remote and to provide a refund to the purchaser or to replace the defective Wii remote with a Wii remote that functions as it is warranted and intended.”

The lawsuit is now awaiting approval of a judge. Nintendo has already recalled the current wrist straps and offered free replacements, so we’re why this law firm feels the need to sue over it. If you feel like joining the class action, there’s information on the firm’s website.

Lawsuit Filed Against Nintendo For Defective Wrist Straps [Daily Tech]

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  1. AlteredBeast (blaming the OP one article at a time.) says:

    requires Nintendo to correct the defect in the Wii remote and to provide a refund to the purchaser or to replace the defective Wii remote with a Wii remote that functions as it is warranted and intended

    This hardly seems helpful to those who shattered $3,000+ TVs.

  2. Daytonna says:

    This type of lawsuit really is disgusting. The manufacturer has already taken steps to improve the straps and to remidy the situation. They really arn’t guilty of anything more than underestimating consumers.. um.. “enthusiasm” while using their Wii remotes.

    Does anyone really wonder why “lawyer” is an insult nowadays?

  3. Kornkob says:

    “…so we’re [not sure] why this law firm feels the need to sue over it.”


    The lawyers are taking action because ‘class action’ suits are not vehicles for reasonable compensation to aggrieved consumers. Class action suits are vehicles for shoveling money into the pockets of lawyers who take on class action suits while getting little to nothing for the ‘class’ they claim to represent.

  4. TheDeadEye says:

    “Owners of the Nintendo Wii reported that when they used the Nintendo remote and wrist strap, as instructed by the material that accompanied the Wii console, the wrist strap broke and caused the remote to leave the user’s hand.”

    How exactly does a broken wrist strap cause the wiimote to magically leave the users hand? The real problem is people flailing their arms around like a wiitard.

  5. Angiol says:

    TheDeadEye: That’s one of the best neologisms I’ve ever seen.

    For that matter, if you’re not smart enough to realize that maybe you should hold on tightly to the Wiimote, and if you’re getting sweaty, that maybe you should pause and dry off your hand, you deserve what you get.

  6. AlteredBeast (blaming the OP one article at a time.) says:

    How exactly does a broken wrist strap cause the wiimote to magically leave the users hand? The real problem is people flailing their arms around like a wiitard.

    I have yet to find a Wii for purchase, but from what I hear, Wii Sports instructs you to use a full range of motion (even though it is not required). This, combined with a speedy volley in tennis, and people (God forbid!) getting exciting playing a game, can easily lead to a Wiimote flying out of someone’s hand.

    Hell, if Nintendo didn’t expect Wiimotes to fly out of peoples’ hands, they wouldn’t have included a wrist strap in the first place.

  7. MeOhMy says:

    Kornkob nailed it. If you are a shady lawyer, you dream of ways to get a class action suit going.

    This one is especially egregious considering they already issued a recall.

    @AlteredBeast – if you think the proposed remedy is garbage, wait until you see what happens when they settle out of court. My guess – each class member will get $5 off their purchase of the next generation Nintendo console.

  8. creamsissle says:

    If this lawsuit progresses, I think the attorney fees should be paid with Wii wrist straps, not dollars.

  9. LatherRinseRepeat says:

    First of all, it’s not a recall. The product is not defective. Nintendo is simply offering an improved handstrap, at no cost. Actually, they started offering the new handstraps prior to this lawsuit. Nintendo should be applauded for listening to customer responses and taking the initiative to improve their products.

    But the real problem here is that some people don’t know how to use the Wiimote. I suspect that these people are intentionally releasing the Wiimote from their hand and using the handstrap as a catch. The handstrap is not supposed to be used that way. It’s there in case you accidentally let go of the Wiimote.

    I certainly hope that the judge sees this as another frivolous lawsuit, and rules in favor of Nintendo. Wii owners are already getting free replacements, so they have nothing to gain from this lawsuit. So obviously, the lawyers are the only ones that will benefit from it. $$$

  10. YoshidaSauce says:

    To LatherRinseRepeat and DeadEye: I agree with you both completely.

    I have a Wii myself and not once has the controller come close to flying out of my hand. Unfortunately, a lot of people don’t realize that swinging your remote 5 miles per hour and 500 miles per hour will NOT affect the force of your swing in the game. In fact, the original strap gives more than enough protection from most people who would have a problem realizing this (most of which Nintendo anticipated to be under the age of 5). Unless you have the grip of a newborn baby, the fact is you don’t even need to wear the strap to take full advantage of the Wiimote’s motion capabilities. Lawfirm’s like this remind me of the lawfirm that sued McDonalds for making their coffee too hot. Simply ricockulous.

  11. adamondi says:

    The real problem with this lawsuit is that the wiimote is not defective at all. The wiimote functions exactly as Nintendo claims it will. There is no defect in the wiimote. There is a serious defect in any wiitard (I also really enjoy this new term) that spazzes out and flings the thing hard enough to break the strap or anything the wiimote hits. But it wouldn’t line the pockets of a-hole attorneys if they blamed the wiitards, would it?

  12. Quippish says:

    I agree with the above comments regarding nintendo’s actions. They’ve already attempted to remedy the situation and certainly aren’t hiding anything about this.

    We can only hope this goes the way of the infamous Donkey Kong lawsuit. I’m certain Nintendo has at least one lawyer who needs a new sailboat.

  13. SexCpotatoes says:

    The McDonalds coffee being too hot, was it being hot enough to cause NERVE DAMAGE. The corporation had been warned about it, and plenty of other fast food places had already lowered the temp. on their coffee pots. What if you spilled coffee in your own lap, and lost ALL feeling in your man-parts, not to mention your genitals were scarred for life, how much compensation would be enough for you? Read, DUMMY!

  14. Kat says:

    The Wii straps are not recalled. Nintendo will replace them for free if you like, but they are not being recalled.

  15. Sudonum says:

    YoshidaSauce, SexCpotatoes is right on here. The coffee was around 190 degrees since that was McDonalds “standard” She offered to settle for her medical costs of $20k. McDonalds refused. In a 10 year period from 1982 to 1992 McDonalds had burn reports from over 700 people but still refused to change their “standards”. McDonalds even admitted that their coffee was not fit for consumption because it was too hot (I can think of other reasons). Check it our here http://www.stellaawards.com/stella.html

    That being said, I agree with the comments here about this being a frivolous. Nintendo is being proactive here.