Solve This Math Problem, Verizon


Considering their ability to convert cents to dollars, Verizon should have no trouble solving this equation.

Since we’re more electrorock than mathcore, we don’t know what the equation means, though we suspect it relates to dimensional analysis. — BEN POPKEN

Verizon Math [xkcd] (Thanks to Dan!)

UPDATE: The end result of the equation is… $.002. The second factor turns into -1 +1, and the last one cancels itself out.

Comments

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  1. acambras says:

    Oh, that is HILARIOUS!

  2. I hope that’s legal. Awesome.

  3. homerjay says:

    This could only have been funnier if he had actually written out that equasion in words. It would have probably required that he figure out how to write in .5 point text, but would have been a hoot to look at!

  4. ElizabethD says:

    Loves it.

  5. drtimhill says:

    Actually, the math is quite funny. The first term (e^(i*pi)) is just part of Euler’s equation, which is (e^(i * pi) + 1 = 0) where i is the square root of -1. So in fact (e^(i*pi) is just -1. The second part is also a simple integration that equals +1, so the result is .002 -1 + 1, which is .002. In other words, the author is saying “here is my .002c worth”. hehe.

    –Tim

  6. wyldhoney says:

    He’s paying them $.002. e^((i)(pi) = -1, and that sum at the end sums up to 1. [1/2 + 1/4+ 1/8 + 1/16 + ...]

    Not like they’d know that or anything.

  7. Ben Popken says:

    Turns out it’s .002 -1 + 1 = $.002 = two tenths of one cent.

  8. SirNuke says:

    Two tenths of a cent plus e to the pi times square root of negative one plus the sum of one divided by two to the n where n is all integers from one to infinity… Dollars

    I haven’t the faintest idea why e^(i*pi) equals -1.

  9. lukos says:

    Euler’s formula is used a lot differential equations. if you haven’t taking higher then second year calculus it wont make any since but it’s a identity used to solve complex integrals like cosxe^x dx. use the identity (mathematical genius figured this out) e^ix=cosx + isinx into that equation (call it the integral of f(x)) where the ‘Real’ part of the integral (e^ix)(e^x) dx equals the integral of f(x). Much easier to solve :D. (cos is real and sin is imaginary). Make since? Probably not but that’s Euler’s.

  10. I’m going to ‘show my work’ on the next check I write. That is too cool!

  11. lukos says:

    “I haven’t the faintest idea why e^(i*pi) equals -1.”

    Euler’s formula is used a lot differential equations. if you haven’t taking higher then second year calculus it wont make any since but it’s a identity used to solve complex integrals like cosxe^x dx. Use the identity (mathematical genius figured this out) e^ix=cosx + isinx into that equation (call it the integral of f(x)) where the ‘Real’ part of the integral (e^ix)(e^x) dx equals the integral of f(x). Much easier to solve :D. (cos is real and sin is imaginary). Make since? Probably not but that’s Euler’s. So e^ipi = cospi + isinpi = 1 + 0. The zero is imaginary number but doesn’t matter.

  12. lukos says:

    cos(pi) = -1 sorry :P

  13. acambras says:

    Damn, lukos, now you took all the fun out of it — I was going to solve that problem on my lunch hour. ;-)

  14. lukos says:

    haha sorry acambras :P and sorry for all the posts, I just made an account and it wasn’t posting until I made a new one then they all came at once haha.

  15. Echodork says:

    There is a Verizon ad ON THIS PAGE as I type this comment. How can Consumerist continue to lambast Verizon in your articles even while you’re pimping their service in your advertising blocks?

    Whiskey tango foxtrot?

  16. cbearnm says:

    A better method that ‘might’ have worked would have been to start from the ground up.
    If I got 1 kb, you would charge 0.002 CENTS
    10 kb – 0.02 CENTS
    100 kb – 0.2 CENTS
    1000 kb – 2 CENTS
    10000 kb – 20 CENTS
    so
    35000 kb ~ 70 CENTS

    The bill should have been slightly more than 70 CENTS, not DOLLARS.

    Then I think the light might have gone on.

    So, what ended up happening. Did Verizon ever admit their error. Did you cave and send the ~$72. How was it resolved?

  17. Nelsormensch says:

    George got a full refund: http://verizonmath.blogspot.com/2006/12/response-from-veri

    However, there are apparently other people in the same situation that Verizon hasn’t responded to one way or the other: http://verizonmath.blogspot.com/index.html

  18. Angiol says:

    lukos – Yeah, that seems to be a comon problem here.

  19. con40dmitri says:

    hah – that is awesome. Verizon is unbelievable.

  20. Mr. Gunn says:

    xkcd rocks. That is all.

  21. tmweber says:
  22. Tina Michie says:

    Actually it 2^ (2pi) = 535.4916
    and .002+ 5354916= 535.493

    and the last infinite sum is 1 since 1/2+ 1/4 +..1/2^n. = 1

    535.493+ 1 = 536.50 about :x

  23. Tina Michie says:

    er i ment e 2 pi = 535.4916 :P