Consumerist Tshirts Canceled

We had a problem with the tshirt printer meaning no one would get their shirts on time, so we canceled the Consumerist tshirt order. This worked out well because only 5 shirts were sold, and we bought two of them. We refunded everyone’s money and issued them a coupon for a free Gawker Shop tshirt.

Look for a new, market-driven, Consumerist tshirt design in the future. — BEN POPKEN

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  1. schvitzatura says:

    Ben, buy up as many verbotenWal-Mart “No Boundaries” totenkopf Shep Fairey knock-offs tees…and have some contests, giving these now rare-as-hen’s-teeth swag away!

  2. RumorsDaily says:

    Ha, it might have been easier (and less embarrassing) to simply email the three people who ordered shirts rather than announcing it the whole world. On the other hand, it was pretty funny to do it this way, so you’re probably breaking even.

  3. Amys Robot says:

    Does the “market driven” reference mean the “Strongly Worded Letter” one has a shot at a comeback? That one was doing pretty well in the polls at one point, but you guys didn’t like it, I think.

  4. The Reviewer says:

    I agree with this choice…a new shirt is a wonderful idea. And I think the Nazi shirt idea kinda works, like…maybe that symbol with the NO symbol over it, and something like Wal-Mart didn’t remove these shirts so we reported on it for 20 days straight, Comsumerist.com

  5. homerjay says:

    NOW what am I going to get my friends and family for christmas???

  6. Jesse in Japan says:

    I liked the “Strongly Written Letter” one, but I didn’t like the “Mystery Shopper” one. I mean, frankly, the whole idea of a mystery shopper sounds completely absurd to me. In any case, it doesn’t really express the anger that consumers feel after being screwed over by big corporations, while “strongly worded letter” is kind of a tongue-in-cheek way of doing it that also more accurately describes what you guys do at the Consumerist.

  7. acambras says:

    Yeah, I had preferred the “Strongly-Worded Letter” one. Especially because, since reading the Consumerist, I’ve been writing a lot more of those letters (positive or negative) to companies.

  8. Trae says:

    The strongly worded letter idea was funny – I would have bought that shirt (which is why I voted for it in the poll). The Mystery Shopper just wasn’t interesting though.