Alton Brown Saves Us Money With Proper Knife Care

A good knife is like a good friend. When your friend gets dull, do you throw him in the trash and buy a new one? Nay sir, nay.

The Food Network’s Alton Brown explains proper knife knife care, and how to get the most bang out of your cutlery chums. The video also features some *very* dynamic camera blocking.

The clips comes to us courtesy of Dethroner, which is, btw, former Consumerist editor Joel Johnson’s latest blog project.

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  1. varco says:

    The guy’s name is Alton Brown, not Aaron Brown. He’s one of the most popular host’s on the network.

  2. I think you mean Alton Brown, but great clip.

  3. LafinJack says:

    The guy’s name is Alton Brown, not Aaron Brown. He’s one of the most popular host’s on the network.

    It amuses me that you correct the spelling of Alton’s name but then put an apostrophe in “host’s”.

  4. Anonymously says:

    I’m having a hell of a time finding a company that does mobile knife sharpening. Does anyone have tips on this?

  5. Just because Alton can’t figure out how to sharpen his own knives doesn’t mean you can’t.

    And, for ordinary people’s plain old cheap kitchen knives, one of those simple manual crossed-sticks sharpeners that you draw the knife through (not one of the electric blade-manglers that Alton rightly decries) will work just fine. That and a $3 steel are all you really need, unless you’ve got much nicer knives than most people own.

    (Further exception: If you’ve got knives with a chisel grind – one side flat, one side ground, as seen on various cheap cleavers and Asian blades – a simple draw-through sharpener will do something weird to the edge. Even then, though, you’ll still probably end up with a perfectly usable knife – but if you do this to a $300 Japanese blade, you’ll hear a blacksmith gently weeping.)

  6. Tankueray says:

    Where can I buy a Can Badger 2000? I want to “hack things to pieces”. Even though I spent a good amount of money on my knife set, I’m thinking that I don’t need to “send it out to a professional sharpener”…”just like professional chefs do” (paraphrased). I’d rather just buy a new set and then throw the old ones into an alley for small children to play with. It’s called “thinning the herd” Alton. Now my pocket knife, that’s a different story. It was really fun at the Las Vegas airport security checkpoint. “What’s a little girl like you doing with a knife like this?” “I’m from Texas.” “Oh, okay then, you’ll need to ship it to yourself” (In the very overpriced shipping setup we have.) “Why thank you, I will do that.” I paid more to ship it back to me than the knife was worth, but sentimental value and all. I got it in the mail TWELVE WEEKS later…oh well, too bad I realized on my next trip that there was a USPS near to the security line. But the cheesy video of a Klingon going through airport security is so worth the wait in the line… Viva Las Vegas!

  7. Anonymously says:

    Or you can pay someone $2 to do it. It depends on how you value your time and how much skill you have.

    You’d think that a store like Bed Bath & Beyond that sells prosumer grade knives would be able to recommend a knife sharpening service, but the one near me couldn’t.

  8. varco says:

    The guy’s name is Alton Brown, not Aaron Brown. He’s one of the most popular host’s on the network.

    It amuses me that you correct the spelling of Alton’s name but then put an apostrophe in “host’s”.

    I see you are unfamiliar with the Law of Conservation of Typos.