Crappiest Laptop Table in the World

Jason obviously didn’t read the warning label on the bottom of the “Freedom Laptop Table ii” informing him the device also doubled as a trebuchet. Too bad for his week-old high-end Acer Ferrari laptop.

He’s put up a webpage about it here, including his correspondence with the company which say its his fault for not reading the warning label on the bottom or for watching the in-store demonstration (which was never offered).

His letters have met with no success. We advise getting a lawyer to draft some threatening letters. Does anyone else have more advice for Jason? (He’s in Australia, so that may changes things a bit).

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  1. tinfoil says:

    Nikki stated that at the bottom of every table is a sticker stating:

    “A warning sticker, which is permanently affixed to the underside of the
    desk/table top (which is visible in your video and would also have been
    visible during assembly of the product), specifically instructs that
    objects (ie a laptop) are to be removed from the top of the desk before
    any adjustment is made. “

    I see a sticker on the bottom of the table in the video, though I am not able to read it. My advice? Man up Nancy, this one is your fault.

  2. The_Truth says:

    Anyone else noticed there has been an increase in articles where the consumer is obviously at fault?

    Seriously, any idiot could see that loosening the nut that holds the table level is goign to cause it to revolve, especially with a heavy object on top.

    Dumbass

  3. trixare4kids says:

    I’m with the poor consumer on this one and I name calling just isn’t necessary, imho.

    Who expects a LAPTOP table to FLIP with such force? I know I certainly wouldn’t.

    Who would look for warnings on the BOTTOM of the table where you can’t see? I certainly wouldn’t.

    He says he read the manual and the warning isn’t there. If the table is going to flip so violently like that, especially something that’s made specifically to hold expensive electronic equipment; the warning SHOULD be in the manual. It should be at the top of the first page, in bold, with a box around it and NOT on the bottom of the freaking table.

    He’s also right about the inherent dangers of items being flipped off the table and onto young heads and I think it should be reported to the consumer safety folks.

  4. Harlan says:

    Agreeing with the previous commenters, the customer is clearly at fault, as far as damage to his laptop is concerned (did he get that no-questions-asked ripoff extra insurance at Best Buy? Let’s hope!). I don’t see, between common sense and the warning label, how the table manufacturer is liable. This said, the product is clearly poorly-designed junk, and should be ridiculed mercilously, which Jason and this Consumerist posting are both doing exceedingly well!

  5. castlecraver says:

    Sorry, this one’s all on the customer. Even without seeing the warning label, who wouldn’t try out the adjustment mechanism first to test the integrity (especially seeing as how the table was some-assembly-required), before placing a laptop on it?

    We all do stupid crap like this, and its gut-wrenching to see an expensive high-end laptop go the way of Barbaro at the Preakness. But its because of guys like this that we have “caution: this beverage may be extremely hot!” printed on our coffee cups now.

  6. yumyum says:

    How about that laptop tables are just fucking stupid to begin with?

  7. mrscolex says:

    trix:

    “Who would look for warnings on the BOTTOM of the table where you can’t see? I certainly wouldn’t.”

    Except that to make the adjustments you have to go underneath the table where the bolts are. Personal responsibility is a tough pill to swallow in today’s age.

  8. Patrick H says:

    I’m kind of in the middle on this one. It would be one thing if this happened when he was trying to adjust the height of the laptop table. But he was specifically trying to adjust the angle of the piece that the laptop was sitting on. Is there anyone here who wouldn’t brace it with one hand knowing that they were loosening a piece that would cause their laptop to swing forward or back? This guy needs a little common sense.

    At the same time, it’s kind of silly to think that the only person who would be adjusting the desk would be the person who assembled it. Still, this guy isn’t too bright and he should have known better.