Monday Morning Reminder: Ben, Use The Damned Readers Tag

Trans-Atlantic candy gram from Mr. John Brownlee, Esq. to Lord Ben Popken, Editor. Remember the readers tag? Stop. You still need to remember to fucking use it. Exclamation point. End communication. Pay the boy, it’s COA.

Anyway, don’t be fooled: even though Ben’s habitual sloth has only enabled us to round-up less than a third of the posts we made last week that originally came from readers’ submissions, your stories and tips are still the heliig bloed of the Consumerist basilica. Roughly half our posts tend to originate with reader submissions. That means that if you’ve got a gripe or an issue that you want to bring to a wider audience, emailing tips@consumerist.com will spill it forth to the masses. And even though they aren’t as fun, we also like to get testimonials about companies that have treated you right, in the hopes of sending more business their way.

One non-obligatory request: if you’ve got a long story to send us and you’re relatively email savvy, see if you can’t compose your email with variable width. It saves us a lot of monotonous backspacing. If you don’t know how to do it or its too much of a bother, we’ll lama sabachthani to the heavens a bit, but don’t worry about it… it’s part of our jobs.

Here’s a tithing of last week’s readers stories:

Dear Diary: Today I Went to Best Buy
Paypal Penalizes Good Samaritan
Blog All Day, Dance All Night
US Bank: The Turning of the Screw You
PierOne Asks Customer To Pay For What Store Lost
O. Henry Gets a Flat
Cingular: We’re So Union
Bad Charge at Macy’s Leads to Good Deed
Casual Corner Card Mysteriously Pupates Into Mastercard

Comments

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  1. mschlock says:

    To avoid that monotonous backspacing, here’s an app that does it (looks like OSX only): http://mailsteward.com/wordwrapper/

    Here’s another thing that works:

    1. Paste email into Microsoft Word (or other word processing app that lets you find/replace paragraph breaks).

    2. Assuming the writer helpfully composed his email in nice, readable paragraphs, the breaks will be represented by two paragraph marks. Do a find for ^p^p and replace it with XZX so you can reparagraph afterwards.

    3. Now do a find for ^p and replace it with a single space. This unwraps the text.

    4. Now that everything is one big block, do a find for XZX and replace it with ^p^p so the paragraphs come back.

    A bit tedious, but feels smarter than just the arrow & backspace keys.