Deceptive Mouseprint Advertising Given Boldface Exposure

The Mouseprint blog is dedicated to pointing out the hilarious juxtaposition between the the big bold print in ads and the sometimes completely contradictory caveats buried in the fine print.

Today they pointed out that the NYC Department of Consumer affairs settled a suit against Sprint and Nextel “Nationwide Long distance included. Every minute, every day,” it turns out there was a a 25cent per minute charge.

Another recent post points out a Microsoft Fingerprint reader which claims to “Replace Passwords with Your Fingerprint.” In the mouseprint? “The fingerprint reader is not a security feature and is intended to be used for convenience only.”

Also note their section on laws governing the use of asterisks in advertising.

Fine work, big yourself up, Mouseprint.org (Thanks to Sara!)

Comments

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  1. People Paula says:

    As frustrating as this is, imagine what amoebaprint will uncover.

  2. Nick says:

    Shouldn’t that be asterisks, not asterixes?

  3. DeeJayQueue says:

    asterices?