The Sucks Site Review: PayPalSucks.com

If you’re going to run a successful Suck Site, you should aim for a big target. PayPal Sucks may have stumbled on powerful internet suck alchemy. Anyone who has used eBay (the owner of PayPal) more than casually will have run afoul of PayPal at least once. And thus, a hit is born.

The site itself is a horrible mess of links, lacking a predominate logo and scattering links around the main body text like so much chicken feed. There’s not even a strong logo on which to center the eye, instead leaving the top-center to a bright yellow ad for “the #1 PayPal Alternative.” In fact, much of the site links to other online transaction brokers, something not unreasonable—in fact, potentially useful!— but that robs the site of some of its authority. The link in the top navigation bar labeled ‘Alternatives’ but linking directly to a ‘Card Service, Intl.’ is by far the most egregious blurring of advocacy and advertisement.

PayPal Sucks does have a few smart ideas hidden here and there, such as the section of the forums for “Reporters looking for people to interview.” Sure, it’s massaging the system, but when you’re trying to get the press and public to notice your cause, sometimes it’s best just to cut the small talk and get down to business.

The Consumerist’s Suck Rating: Four Homemade PayPalSucks.com T-Shirts With Prominent Alexa Rankings (Out of Ten)

More of The Consumerist’s Sucks Site Reviews

Comments

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  1. mrscolex says:

    I think you guys just fell for a trick hook line and sinker.

    That website is setup deliberately private through its whois records, and of course that can be innocent, but I’m willing to bet you that that website is setup specifically by the companies its advertising in order to make revenue.

    I don’t think that website is in the interest of consumers at all, but more in the interest of spreading a bad name for paypal and putting a sour taste in the consumer’s mouth.

    That may be a good thing, but I’m not positive that the alternatives and fishy links really promote a much safer environment.